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dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiro
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell-Jones, Robert
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Ann-Marie
dc.contributor.authorKnutton, Natalie
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-29T16:04:31Z
dc.date.available2021-06-29T16:04:31Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-17
dc.identifier.citationKotera, Y., Maxwell-Jones, R., Edwards, A., M. and Knutton, N. (2021). 'Burnout in professional psychotherapists: Relationships with self-compassion, work-life balance, and telepressure'. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, pp. 1-12.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18105308
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625847
dc.description.abstractThough negative impacts of COVID-19 on occupational mental health have been reported, the mental health of psychotherapists has not been evaluated in depth. As this occupational group treats ever-increasing mental health problems, it is essential to appraise key factors for their mental health. Accordingly, this study aimed to explore burnout of professional psychotherapists. A total of 110 participants completed self-report measures regarding burnout, self-compassion, work-life balance and telepressure. Correlation, regression and moderation analyses were conducted. Both of the burnout components-emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation-were positively associated with weekly working hours and telepressure, and negatively associated with age, self-compassion and work-life balance. Weekly working hours and work-life balance were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Lastly, self-compassion partially mediated the relationship between work-life balance and emotional exhaustion but did not mediate the relationship between work-life balance and depersonalisation. The findings suggest that maintaining high work-life balance is particularly important for the mental health of psychotherapists, protecting them from burnout. Moreover, self-compassion needs to be cultivated to mitigate emotional exhaustion. Mental health care for this occupational group needs to be implemented to achieve sustainable mental health care for workers and the public.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/10/5308en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectburnouten_US
dc.subjectdepersonalisationen_US
dc.subjectemotional exhaustionen_US
dc.subjectself-compassionen_US
dc.subjecttelepressureen_US
dc.subjectwork-life balanceen_US
dc.titleBurnout in Professional Psychotherapists: Relationships with Self-Compassion, Work–Life Balance, and Telepressureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.identifier.piiijerph18105308
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue10
dc.source.beginpage5308
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-07
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-29T16:04:32Z
dc.author.detail783564en_US


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