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dc.contributor.authorElander, James
dc.contributor.authorBeach, Mary Catherine
dc.contributor.authorHaywood, Carlton
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-22T12:24:26Z
dc.date.available2021-01-22T12:24:26Z
dc.date.issued2011-07-28
dc.identifier.citationElander, J., Haywood, C., & Beach, M.C. (2011). 'Respect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practice'. Ethnicity and Health, 16(4-5), pp. 405-421.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1355-7858
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13557858.2011.555520
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625554
dc.description.abstractQualitative interview studies suggest that adult patients’ experiences of hospital treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain reflect an absence of respect by providers for patients, and an absence or breakdown of trust. Systematic comparisons between treatment settings could help identify contextual influences on respect and trust. Quantitative comparison of concern-raising behaviors (pain treatment outcomes indicating breakdowns of trust) among adult SCD patients in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A., and London, U.K., followed by analysis of potential explanations for differences, including socio-cultural and behavioral factors, with a preliminary model of the processes leading to concern-raising behaviors. Rates of concern-raising behaviors were significantly higher in Baltimore than London. The model identifies respect and trust as key factors which could be targeted in efforts to improve the quality of SCD pain management in hospital. An agenda for international, interdisciplinary research to improve the treatment of SCD pain in hospital should include: comparative analyses between countries and treatment settings of factors that could influence respect and trust; research to test hypotheses derived from models about the roles of respect and trust in the treatment of pain; studies of the impact of healthcare structures and policy on patients’ experiences of care; research focusing on developmental and interpersonal processes related to respect and trust; applications of attribution and other social psychology theories; and development and evaluation of interventions to improve the hospital treatment of SCD pain by increasing respect and trust.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13557858.2011.555520en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectRespecten_US
dc.subjectTrusten_US
dc.subjectSCD painen_US
dc.subjectConcern-raising behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectHospital treatmenten_US
dc.titleRespect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1465-3419
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentJohn Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAen_US
dc.identifier.journalEthnicity and Healthen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/13557858.2011.555520
dc.source.journaltitleEthnicity & Health
dc.source.volume16
dc.source.issue4-5
dc.source.beginpage405
dc.source.endpage421
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-01-14
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-22T12:24:26Z
dc.author.detail779740en_US


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