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dc.contributor.authorBrosnan, Damian
dc.contributor.authorPritchard, John
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T09:59:22Z
dc.date.available2017-03-24T09:59:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-01
dc.identifier.citationBrosnan, D. and Pritchard, J. (2016) 'The assessment of dog barking noise from kennels', Acoustics Bulletin, 41(3), p. 43en
dc.identifier.issn0308-437X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621520
dc.description.abstractIn light of the plethora of guidance documents available for a wide range of noise sources and activities, the absence of a document specific to dog barking is unfortunate, and a glaring omission in the noise guidance library. In the absence of any existing guidance documents, approaches adopted by Noise Consultants and Local Authority EHOs in the British Isles are highly variable, and no emerging trends are readily apparent, apart from widespread misapplication of BS 4142:1997 when assessing impacts. Although the 2014 version of the standard specifically precludes application to domestic animal noise, several interviewed Consultants indicate that they intend to apply same due to the absence of any other guidance. All Consultants interviewed acknowledged the need for a kennel noise guidance document which will allow a consistent approach to be adopted by Consultants and planning authorities alike. Such a document might include guidance on measurement methodology, predictive modelling, noise limits, and advice on kennel design and noise management, and would benefit Planning Departments, Environmental Health personnel, kennel operators and Noise Consultants. It is considered that the derivation of suitable noise limits would require some element of social annoyance studies relating to barking noise, in order to identify (a) a suitable noise descriptor and (b) thresholds of annoyance. A barking noise guidance document may benefit from inclusion of an assessment methodology based on a specified number of barks to be measured, similar to the method set out in the CIEH clay target shooting guidance document.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Acousticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ioa.org.uk/publications/acoustics-bulletin-pasten
dc.relation.urlhttp://ioa.org.uk/publications/st-albans-library-catalogue?display_name=&title_paper_article_144=&publisher_146=&bepac_code_147=&isbn_150=&issn_151=&author_s_145=brosnan&year_155=2016&conference_title_163=&combine=en
dc.subjectNoiseen
dc.subjectDogsen
dc.subjectLocal authorityen
dc.titleThe assessment of dog barking noise from kennelsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalAcoustics Bulletinen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T15:37:17Z
html.description.abstractIn light of the plethora of guidance documents available for a wide range of noise sources and activities, the absence of a document specific to dog barking is unfortunate, and a glaring omission in the noise guidance library. In the absence of any existing guidance documents, approaches adopted by Noise Consultants and Local Authority EHOs in the British Isles are highly variable, and no emerging trends are readily apparent, apart from widespread misapplication of BS 4142:1997 when assessing impacts. Although the 2014 version of the standard specifically precludes application to domestic animal noise, several interviewed Consultants indicate that they intend to apply same due to the absence of any other guidance. All Consultants interviewed acknowledged the need for a kennel noise guidance document which will allow a consistent approach to be adopted by Consultants and planning authorities alike. Such a document might include guidance on measurement methodology, predictive modelling, noise limits, and advice on kennel design and noise management, and would benefit Planning Departments, Environmental Health personnel, kennel operators and Noise Consultants. It is considered that the derivation of suitable noise limits would require some element of social annoyance studies relating to barking noise, in order to identify (a) a suitable noise descriptor and (b) thresholds of annoyance. A barking noise guidance document may benefit from inclusion of an assessment methodology based on a specified number of barks to be measured, similar to the method set out in the CIEH clay target shooting guidance document.


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