• Second-generation mindfulness-based interventions: toward more authentic mindfulness practice and teaching

      Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-11-15)
      In recent years, a dialogue has emerged concerning the extent to which mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) teach and embody the essence of mindfulness according to longstanding conceptualizations of the technique. Traditionally, mindfulness was an integral component of a broad spectrum of contemplative practices, that when practiced collectively and correctly, reflected a rounded path of spiritual practice (Shonin et al. 2014). However, as part of its recent integration into various applied settings, it appears that some MBIs have largely isolated mindfulness from the techniques and practice principles that traditionally supported it. In such cases, a question that arises is whether mindfulness should still be called “mindfulness”, or whether in some of its modern interventional forms, it has been transposed into an “attention-based psychological technique” (Van Gordon et al. 2016). Regardless of the answer to this question, evidence from thousands of empirical studies suggest that this transposed technique has applications for improving health and human performance. Thus, the aforementioned dialogue has less to do with whether MBIs have demonstrable efficacy, and more to do with whether (i) there is sufficient transparency and scrutiny concerning the claims made by some MBI proponents regarding the authenticity of the technique they purport to teach, (ii) there are contexts in which a more traditional intervention-based form of mindfulness would be more appropriate or efficacious, and (iii) some prospective mindfulness practitioners would welcome more choice in terms of the degree to which an MBI follows the traditional practice model.
    • Self-compassion in Irish social work students: Relationships between resilience, engagement and motivation

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Tsuda-McCaie, Freya; Edwards, Ann-Marie; Bhandari, Divya; Maughan, Geraldine; University of Derby; Medical Governance Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan; Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Ireland (MDPI AG, 2021-08-02)
      Self-compassion recognises a meaning of life's suffering, aligning with existential positive psy-chology. Although this construct is known to protect our mental health, how to augment self-compassion remains to be evaluated. Social work students suffer from high rates of mental health problems, however research into self-compassion in this population remains to be devel-oped. This study aimed to evaluate i) relationships between self-compassion and more tradition-al positive constructs—resilience, engagement and motivation, and ii) differences of these con-structs between the levels of studies, to inform how self-compassion can be enhanced in social work students. One hundred twenty-nine Irish social work students completed self-report scales regarding self-compassion, resilience, engagement and motivation. Correlation, regression, and one-way MANOVA were conducted. Self-compassion was associated with gender, age, resili-ence, engagement and intrinsic motivation. Resilience and intrinsic motivation were significant predictors of self-compassion. There was no significant difference in the levels of these constructs between the levels of studies. Findings suggest that social work educators across different levels can strengthen students’ resilience and intrinsic motivation to cultivate the students' self-compassion. Moreover, the close relationships between self-compassion, resilience and in-trinsic motivation indicate that orienting students to a meaning of the studies helps their mental health.
    • Self-criticism and self-reassurance as mediators between mental health attitudes and symptoms: Attitudes towards mental health problems in Japanese workers.

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Gilbert, Paul; Asano, Kenichi; Ishimura, Ikuo; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Wiley, 2018-12-13)
      Japanese workers suffer high rates of mental health symptoms, recognised recently by the Japanese government, which has enacted workplace well-being initiatives. One reason for poor mental health concerns negative attitudes about mental health problems such as shame, which may be mediated by self-reassurance and self-criticism. This study aimed to evaluate shame-based attitudes towards mental health problems, and explore the relationship between mental health attitudes, self-criticism, self-reassurance and mental health symptoms. Japanese workers (n=131) completed three measures; attitudes towards mental health problems, mental health symptoms, and self-criticism/reassurance. A high proportion of workers reported negative attitudes about mental health problems. There were strong relationships between mental health attitudes, mental health symptoms, self-criticism, and self-reassurance. Path analyses revealed that the total and indirect effects (through self-criticism and self- reassurance) of mental health attitudes on mental health were larger than the direct effect alone. Hated-self and family-reflected shame were identified as predictors for mental health symptoms. The findings suggest the importance of self-criticism and self-reassurance in mental health and mental health attitudes. Implications for help-seeking behaviours are also discussed. Interventions aimed at reducing self-criticism and enhancing self-reassurance are recommended to improve mental health attitudes and increase help-seeking in Japanese workers.
    • Self-injury and self-concept

      Ducasse, D.; Van Gordon, William; Courtet, P; Ollie, E; University of Derby; Neuropsychiatry Epidemiological and Clinical Research, Montpellier, Franc; Lapeyronie Hospital, Department of Emergency Psychiatry and Post Acute Care, CHRU Montpellier, France (Elsevier, 2019-07-30)
    • Setting up and initiating patient public involvement (PPI) as a collaborative process benefits research in its early stages

      Varkonyi-Sep, Judit; Cross, Ainslea; Howarth, Peter; University of Southampton; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2017-09)
    • Slips, trips and falls in crowds

      Filingeri, Victoria; Haslam, Roger; Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK (Springer Link, 2018-08-05)
      Crowd situations are commonplace and involve circumstances known to lead to slips, trips and falls (STF). Data from focus groups with crowd participants (5 groups, n = 35 individuals); observations of crowd situations (n = 55); and interviews with crowd organisers (n = 41) were analysed to examine understanding of and responses to the risk of STF in crowds. Although safety was a high priority for both crowd participants and organisers, explicit consideration of STF as a safety concern was low among both groups. Crowd observations found STF risks mitigated on some occasions and present on others, without any discernible pattern for the variation. A risk management framework for STF risk in crowds is proposed. It is concluded that improved understanding is needed of the nature and pattern of STF occurrence in crowds and the efficacy of measures for prevention.
    • A snapshot of the lives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A photovoice investigation.

      Williams, Sophie; Sheffield, David; Knibb, Rebecca C.; University of Derby (Sage Publications, 2014-09-09)
      Polycystic ovary syndrome affects 6  percent of women. Symptoms include hirsutism, acne, and infertility. This research explores the impact of polycystic ovary syndrome on women’s lives using photovoice. Nine participants photographed objects related to their quality of life and made diary entries explaining each photograph. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis of the diaries: control (of symptoms and polycystic ovary syndrome controlling their lives), perception (of self, others, and their situation), and support (from relationships, health care systems, and education). These findings illuminate positive aspects of living with polycystic ovary syndrome and the role pets and social networking sites play in providing support for women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
    • Social ecological interventions to increase physical activity in children and young people living with and beyond cancer: a systematic review

      Cross, Ainslea; Howlett, Neil; Sheffield, David; University of Derby; University of Hertfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-29)
      To identify the behaviour change techniques and intervention components associated with the promotion of physical activity (PA) for children and young people living with and beyond cancer. A systematic review and narrative synthesis was conducted on the evidence on PA interventions for children and young people (up to 30 years of age) living with and beyond cancer using a social ecological framework. Out of 12 studies, 8 were shown to change PA. Intervention components included (1) behavioural (Instruction on how to perform the behaviour, credible source, behavioural demonstration and rehearsal), (2) cognitive-emotional (targeting attitude, perceived behavioural control, intentions, resilience and achievement) (3) socio-cultural (family and peer support for PA), (4) environmental (providing access to resources, environmental restructuring, safety), (5) demographic (child, adolescent, young adult or mixed) and (6) medical (tailored exercise depending on age and cancer stage). Conclusions: Interventions designed to increase physical activity participation and adherence during and beyond cancer treatment for young people should integrate psychosocial (behavioural, cognitive-emotional, social), environmental and medical intervention components. Our conceptual model can be used to inform the development of interventions and guides future research objectives and priorities.
    • Social Network Analysis of Alzheimer’s Teams: A Clinical Review and Applications in Psychiatry to Explore Interprofessional Care

      Lazzari, Carlo; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Green, Pauline; Rabottini, Marco; University of Derby (Bentham Science, 2021-06)
      Understanding the social networks of professionals in psychiatric hospitals and communities working with persons with Alzheimer’s (PWA) disease helps tackle the knowledge management in patient care and the centrality of team members in providing information and advice to colleagues. To use Social Network Analysis (SNA) to confirm or reject the hypothesis that psychiatric professionals have equal status in sharing information and advice on the care of PWA and have reciprocal ties in a social network. The sample consisting of 50 psychiatric professionals working in geriatric psychiatry in the UK completed an anonymous online survey asking them to select the professional categories of the colleagues in the interprofessional team who are most frequently approached when providing or receiving advice about patient care and gathering patient information. SNA is both a descriptive qualitative analysis and a quantitative method that investigates the degree of the prestige of professionals in their working network, the reciprocity of their ties with other team members, and knowledge management. The social network graphs and numerical outcomes showed that interprofessional teams in geriatric psychiatry have health carers who play central roles in providing the whole team with the knowledge necessary for patient care; these are primarily senior professionals in nursing and medical roles. However, the study reported that only 13% of professionals had reciprocal ties with knowledge sharing within teams. The current research findings show that knowledge management in interprofessional teams caring for PWA is not evenly distributed. Those with apparently higher seniority and experience are more frequently consulted; however, other more peripheral figures can be equally valuable in integrated care.
    • Social network analysis of dementia wards in psychiatric hospitals to explore the advancement of personhood in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

      Lazzari, Carlo; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Thomas, Hywel; University of Derby; Swansea University (Bentham Science Publishers, 2019-06-12)
      Little is known on investigating how healthcare teams in dementia wards act for promoting personhood in persons with Alzheimer's disease (PWA). The current research aimed to identify the social networks of dementia health carers promoting the personhood of PWA in acute or long-term dementia wards in public and private psychiatric hospitals. We used a mixed-method research approach. Ethnographic observations and two-mode Social Network Analysis (SNA) captured the role and social networks of healthcare professionals promoting PWA personhood, using SocNetv version 2.4. The social network graphs illustrated how professionals participated in PWA care by computing the degree of centrality (%DC) for each professional; higher values indicated more statistical significance of a professional role compared to others in the provision of personhood care. The categories of personhood were biological, individual, and sociologic. Nurses, doctors, ward managers, hospital managers, clinical psychologists, occupational therapists, care coordinators, physiotherapists, healthcare assistants, and family members were observed if they were promoting PWA personhood. The highest %DC in SNA in biological personhood was held by the ward nurses (36%), followed by the ward doctors (20%) and ward managers (20%). All professional roles were involved in 16% of cases in the promotion of individual personhood, while the hospital managers had the highest %DC (33%) followed by the ward managers and nurses (27%) in the sociologic personhood. All professional roles were deemed to promote PWA personhood in dementia wards, although some limitation exists according to the context of the assessment.
    • Stress and risky decision making: Cognitive reflection, emotional learning or both.

      Simonovic, Boban; Stupple, Edward J. N.; Gale, Maggie; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Wiley, 2016-08-19)
      Stressful situations hinder judgment. Effects of stress induced by anticipated public speaking on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) were examined. The Cognitive Reflection Task (CRT) was used to examine the relationship between reflective thinking and IGT performance. The stress manipulation increased blood pressure and was associated with poorer IGT and CRT performance. Stressed participants were slower to avoid the disadvantageous decks. Moreover, CRT scores correlated with optimal deck selections indicating the importance of reflective thinking for good performance on the IGT. These correlations were observed in relatively early trials, which challenges the view that analytic thinking is not important when card contingencies are being learned. Data revealed that IGT performance in healthy individuals is not always optimal; stress levels impair performance. A mediation analysis was consistent with the proposal that the stress manipulation reduced IGT performance by impeding reflective thinking. Thus reflective processing is an important explanation of IGT performance in healthy populations. It was concluded that more reflective participants appear to learn from the outcomes of their decisions even when stressed.
    • Study protocol: a pilot study investigating mental health in the UK police force

      Edwards, Ann-Marie; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Concurrent Disorders Society, 2020-04)
      Police workers in the United Kingdom suffer from poor mental health, which is exacerbated by stigma associated with mental health problems. Accordingly, this study protocol paper presents a pilot study aiming to appraise direct experiences of mental illness among police officers, and the culture in the police workforce towards officers suffering with a mental health problem, while evaluating the feasibility of a large study. Thematic analysis on semi-structured interviews was designed to capture their first-hand experience. Ethical considerations and dissemination plans were discussed.
    • Study protocol: psychoeducation on attachment and narcissism as treatment of sex addiction

      Rhodes, Christine; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Concurrent Disorders Society, 2021-07-22)
      This study protocol reports a research design to examine the effects of a psycho-educational programme about attachment and narcissism on sex addiction. Previous research highlighted the great impacts of anxious attachment and narcissism on sex addiction. Unlike therapeutic approaches, where a therapist intervenes the client, psychoeducation can influence clients’ symptoms more subtly related to their less resistance. Further, considering a strong association between sex addiction and narcissism, such an approach may be more conducive. Given high shame associated with sex addictions and clients existing in many countries, the programme is implemented online using recorded videos, delivered four times weekly. Findings from this study can inform utility of this original intervention for sex addiction.
    • Symptoms of anxiety and depression are related to cardiovascular responses to active, but not passive, coping tasks

      Yuenyongchaiwat, Kornanong; Baker, Ian S.; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Brazilian Psychiatric Association, 2016-11-07)
      Objective: Anxiety and depression have been linked to blunted blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) reactions to mental stress tests; however, most studies have not included indices of underlying hemodynamics nor multiple stress tasks. This study sought to examine the relationships of anxiety and depression with hemodynamic responses to acute active and passive coping tasks. Methods: A total of 104 participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales and mental arithmetic, speech, and cold pressor tasks while BP, HR, total peripheral resistance, and cardiac output (CO) were assessed. Results: After adjustment for traditional risk factors and baseline cardiovascular activity, depression scores were negatively associated with systolic BP, HR, and CO responses to the mental arithmetic task, while anxiety scores were inversely related to the systolic BP response to mental arithmetic. Conclusion: High anxiety or depression scores appear to be associated with blunted cardiac reactions to mental arithmetic (an active coping task), but not to the cold pressor test or speech tasks. Future research should further examine potential mechanisms and longitudinal pathways relating depression and anxiety to cardiovascular reactivity.
    • Systematic review and meta-synthesis of coping with retinitis pigmentosa: implications for improving quality of life

      Garip, Gulcan; Kamal, Atiya; University of Derby (BMC/ Springer Nature, 2019-08-13)
      Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are a group of incurable and inherited eye conditions, and the leading cause of inherited blindness in people under the age of 60. The aim of this systematic review and meta-synthesis was to present a comprehensive overview of qualitative papers on experiences and coping strategies of adults living with RP, and how these influence quality of life. A pre-registered search strategy was applied in nine databases and 12 articles met eligibility criteria. Studies included were from Australia, Brazil, Ireland, Netherlands, Republic of Korea, United Kingdom, and USA. The overall sample was based on 126 people with RP (ages ranging from 18 to 85; at least 65 female). Principles of meta-ethnography were used to synthesise the articles revealing five higher-level meta-themes. The five higher-level meta-themes were, 1) managing identity: making sense of RP, managing autonomy and independence; 2) living with RP: practical and emotional issues; 3) experiences with healthcare professionals and other social support; 4) adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies; and 5) impact of RP on work and career. A conceptual model was developed by grouping higher-level meta-themes as intra- and inter-individual factors and how they may be implicated with coping strategies and quality of life. This review established factors that can be explored as potential psychosocial influences in the relationship between coping strategies and quality of life in people with RP. Further understanding of these factors and mechanisms can help inform intervention development to support adaptive coping in living with RP and positively impact quality of life.
    • Systematic review: self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with Type 2 Diabetes

      Chircop, James; Sheffield, David; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2021-07-20)
      The benefit of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in the reduction of HbA1c in non-insulin-treated participants remains unclear. HbA1c may be improved in this population with SMBG. We aimed to investigate this. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed comparing SMBG versus usual care and structured versus unstructured SMBG; the effect of clinician therapy adjustment based on SMBG readings was examined. Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central were electronically searched to identify articles published from 1 January 2000 to 30 June 2020. Trials investigating changes in HbA1c were selected. Screening was performed independently by two investigators. Two investigators extracted HbA1c at baseline and follow-up for each trial. Nineteen RCTs, involving 4,965 participants were included. Overall, SMBG reduced HbA1c. Preplanned subgroup analysis showed that using SMBG readings to adjust therapy contributed significantly to the reduction. No significant improvement in HbA1c was shown in SMBG without therapy adjustment). The same difference was observed in structured SMBG compared to unstructured SMBG. HbA1c is improved with therapy adjustment based on structured SMBG readings. Implications are for clinicians to prescribe structured SMBG with an aim for therapy adjustment based on the readings, and not prescribing unstructured SMBG. Participants with suboptimal glycemic control may benefit most. A SMBG regimen that improves clinical- and cost-effectiveness is presented. Future studies can investigate this regimen specifically.
    • Teaching Healthcare Professional Students in Online Learning during COVID-19: Reflection of University Lecturers

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Spink, Rachel; Brooks-Ucheaga, Michelle; Green, Pauline; Rawson, Rebecca; Rhodes, Christine; Chircop, James; Williams, Alan; Okere, Uche; Lyte, Geraldine; et al. (Concurrent Disorders Society Inc., 2021-05-13)
      Online education has been regarded as a lifeline for many education institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic, offering students a means to advance their education and career. While face-to-face teaching universities convert their education curricula to the online settings, many institutions lack effective online teaching strategies, leading to reduced student enrolment and satisfaction. Contrarily, we have been receiving an ever-increasing number of healthcare professional students in our learning department since the outbreak, while maintaining high satisfaction. These students work as registered professional key workers and study online. Among numerous measures taken to support this student group, this short paper reports four effective teaching practices we have implemented: (a) active use of adaptive learning, (b) Padlet discussions, (c) wellbeing webinars, and (d) resilience building. These teaching strategies are deemed to address weaknesses of online learning and offer emotional support to students. Our teaching practices will be useful to many universities supporting this crucial group of students in the online environment.
    • Theoretical Perspectives of Crisis Management and Recovery for Events

      Ziakas, Vassilios; Antchak, Vladimir; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; University of Queensland (Goodfellow Publishers, 2021-04)
      The world is always subject to crises and many times significant developments or changes occur in the aftermath of a crisis. In this regard, any crisis can be viewed as a turning point or critical juncture, though typically characterized by ambiguity, volatility and grave worries about the future. A crisis can cause continuing existential and socio-economic impacts; however, it also provides opportunities for creativity and innovation by re-imagining and reconfiguring the strategic purpose of organizations. Crises are apposite circumstances for reflection on management approaches, decision-making and the overall stability and sustainability of any system within which individual organizations operate. Arguably, any crisis prompts change to systems and organizations analogous to its scale and extent of multifaceted impacts. The recent COVID-19 pandemic is a case in point of a multifaceted crisis as it is not only a health emergency. It entirely disrupted the social world and its commerce bringing about serious repercussions to the everyday life of people. The event sector, being a mirror of society, has been affected dramatically. Compulsory closures and regulations regarding social distancing led to innumerable postponements or cancellations of planned events, from the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo to the smallest of community celebrations. Professional and amateur sports alike postponed or cancelled their seasons. Businesses of all scales all along the supply chain, including the venues, entertainers, and suppliers of goods and services, suffered enormous economic losses.
    • Three good things in nature: Noticing nearby nature brings sustained increases in connection with nature.

      Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2017-01-12)
      Connecting people more fully with nature is emerging as a societal issue owing to the state of nature, links to pro-environmental behaviour and benefits to wellbeing. Simple, low-cost, interventions that deliver sustained increases in nature connectedness would be valuable. Participants (n=50) noted three good things in nature each day for five days and a control group noted three factual things (n=42). The intervention group showed sustained and significant increases in nature connectedness compared to the control group. Increases in nature connectedness were associated with psychological health improvement in the intervention group. Noting the good things in nature each day can deliver sustained increases in peoples’ connection with nature.; Connecting people more fully with nature is emerging as a societal issue owing to the state of nature, links to pro-environmental behaviour and benefits to wellbeing. Simple, low-cost interventions that deliver sustained increases in nature connectedness would be valuable. Participants (n = 50) noted three good things in nature each day for five days and a control group noted three factual things (n = 42). The intervention group showed sustained and significant increases in nature connectedness compared to the control group. Increases in nature connectedness were associated with psychological health improvement in the intervention group. Noting the good things in nature each day can deliver sustained increases in people’s connection with nature.
    • Threshold effects of housing affordability and financial development on the house price-consumption nexus

      Apergis, Nicholas; Coskun, Esra; Coskun, Yener; University of Derby; University of Huddersfield; University of Sheffield (Wiley, 2020-08-28)
      The study explores the asymmetric effect of housing and financial wealth on household consumption behavior using panel data from 24 OECD countries, spanning the period 2000 to 2016 by employing a financial development (FD) index (proxy for financial deepening) and the house price-to-income (HPI) ratio (proxy for housing affordability) through a threshold empirical framework. The analysis tests certain hypotheses, such as: (i) the housing wealth effect on consumption is stronger than its financial counterpart, (ii) overall wealth effects increase (decrease) during bubble (post bubble) periods, (iii) the higher level of financial development and the lower level of housing affordability ratio both result in stronger wealth effects, (iv) increasing wealth effects show a bubble formation. The results suggest that housing wealth has generally a greater positive effect on consumption. The effect of housing and financial wealth on consumption increases, depending on higher financial development and declining housing affordability. The evidence also suggests that the impact of housing and stock market wealth has increased during the dot.com and housing bubble periods.