• Women and access to environmental justice in Nigeria

      Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby (Institute for African Women in Law, 2020-10)
    • Work-family policy expansion and the idea of social investment: the cases of Germany, England, South Korea and Japan

      Lee, Sung-Hee; Mohun Himmelweit, Samuel; University of Derby; London School of Economics (Policy Press, 2021-02-26)
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Batchelor, Lauren; Loynes, Tony; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-29)
      The World Health Organisation (WHO) [(2018). The top ten causes of death. http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top10-causes-of-death] highlights that 12.2 million people die globally from non-communicable diseases while still in work. The effect of poor work and lifestyle habits on health is directing some of the responsibility for changing behaviours to employers, through the development of workplace wellness programmes [Baker (2017). Obesity statistics. House of Commons Library]. However, literature reveals an important challenge with workplace wellness programmes, namely, the measurement of their success to identify return on investment (ROI). Furthermore, the vast number of employers are reluctant to implement anything that costs money without knowing that it will be successful [Mattke et al. 2013. Workplace wellness programs study (1st ed.). Rand Corporation]. A challenge is therefore presented, in identifying appropriate measures of success for workplace wellness programmes, which can be presented in order to validate investment in them. This paper emphasises the need to develop a measurement tool which employs both quantitative and qualitative measures, to demonstrate the success in both financial and human terms, furthermore it asserts that a measurement tool could provide data which is required to secure investment from employers in workplace wellness programmes (Mattke et al. 2013) and facilitate benchmarking of similar organisation in terms of workplace wellness outcomes [Emkjer (2013). Focus On… Employee Health, Moving the Needle on Employee Wellness: The Human Factor. Employee Benefits Plan Review Dec 2013].
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Loynes, Tony; Batchelor, Lauren; University of Derby (2018-06-28)
    • World Society and a World State in the Shadow of the World Market: Democracy and Global Political Economy

      Nunn, Alex; Morgan, Jamie; Leeds Beckett University (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2016)
    • Worrying Times: The fear of crime and nostalgia

      Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-02-24)
      As well as finding empirical relationships between victimisation, key socio-demographic variables, and various psychological and environmental processes, criminologists have long suspected that the feelings now identified, corralled together and labelled as ‘the fear of crime’ have roots in the wider shifts in the social, economic bases of society. In this paper, and using survey data from a nationally-representative sample of Britons aged over 16 (n = 5781), we explore the relationships between feelings of political and social nostalgia and the fear of crime. We find that nostalgia is indeed strongly related to crime fears, and, indeed, stronger even than variables such as victimisation, gender, and age (three of the frequently cited associates of fear). We go on to explore these relationships further in terms of different socio-economic classes, and relate feelings of nostalgia and fear to their recent (i.e. post-1945) historical trajectories.
    • Worship & sightseeing: building a partnership approach to a ministry of welcome

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby; University of Pannonia (2013)
      This paper explores diverse opportunities for partnerships between the sacred and secular at religious sites. It identifies ways in which tourism suppliers can work collaboratively with sacred sites to enable sites to meet the demands of contemporary secular and sacred stakeholders. In the review of contemporary literature we consider supply and demand issues, site management, key components of partnership, ecumenical co-creation resources, cost-benefit and marketing needs. The paper is predicated on the provision of information and interpretation services for guidance, and development of all of these services. Methodologically, a participant observation approach was employed to confirm that tourism fits the strategic intent of religious leaders. We consider that partnership at a national, diocesan and parish level is an important part in effective tourism development. Elements of community involvement; capacity building and in- community development through engaging stakeholders are discussed. The balance achieved between stakeholders is important, and in our context the balance between local government and the tourism industry, and between active partners and the passive policy community, reflects the aims of the sacred and the private sector key partners, and the wider social capacity building aspects of community development agendas and government.
    • Worship & sightseeing: building a partnership approach to a ministry of welcome

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby, University of Pannonia (2013)
      This paper explores diverse opportunities for partnerships between the sacred and secular at religious sites. It identifies ways in which tourism suppliers can work collaboratively with sacred sites to enable sites to meet the demands of contemporary secular and sacred stakeholders. In the review of contemporary literature we consider supply and demand issues, site management, key components of partnership, ecumenical co-creation resources, cost-benefit and marketing needs. The paper is predicated on the provision of information and interpretation services for guidance, and development of all of these services. Methodologically, a participant observation approach was employed to confirm that tourism fits the strategic intent of religious leaders. We consider that partnership at a national, diocesan and parish level is an important part in effective tourism development. Elements of community involvement; capacity building and in-community development through engaging stakeholders are discussed. The balance achieved between stakeholders is important, and in our context the balance between local government and the tourism industry, and between active partners and the passive policy community, reflects the aims of the sacred and the private sector key partners, and the wider social capacity building aspects of community development agendas and government.
    • Written evidence from Dr Michael Teague, Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Derby.

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (Houses of Parliament, 2018-01-10)
      The demographics of our prison population reflect the issues that our penal system must address if it is to be successful in lowering reoffending. The size of the prison population appears to be linked with sentencing behaviour. Prison sentences are getting longer. The current prison population projections appear to accurately reflect our current state of knowledge. Over the longer term, growth is likely in the determinate sentenced population. Safety is the cornerstone upon which rehabilitative intervention in prison is built. Urgent action to guarantee safety in prisons is required. The increasing incidence of self-harm raises continuing concerns. The use of community sentencing options should be prioritised.
    • The wrong harvest: The law on saviour siblings

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2015-02-11)
      The momentous case of Quintavalle supported the creation of saviour siblings in English law. The House of Lords confirmed that embryos can be selected for social purposes according to the desires of the mother. This article discusses the implications of that decision for the welfare of saviour siblings and argues that harvesting of young saviour siblings is difficult to justify under the current fragmentary law.
    • Y v A Healthcare Trust and the Mental Capacity Act 2005: taking gamete retrieval to the bank

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Sweet & Maxwell, 2019-04)
      Comments on the application in Y v A Healthcare NHS Trust (CP) of the best interests test set out in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 s.4 to the retrieval of sperm from a man suspected of being brainstem dead, and the approach to consent to storage and use in fertility treatment by his wife. Questions whether a construction of best interests which extends to potential wishes is appropriate in the strictly regulated context of assisted conception.
    • You can lead a firm to R&D but can you make it innovate? UK evidence from SMEs

      Cowling, M; University of Brighton (Springer, 16/02/2016)
      The UK Government introduced tax credits for SMEs to promote and support R&D in 2000. Since then the policy has become more generous in this respect, particularly since 2008. In this paper, we use the National Systems of Entrepreneurship as a conceptual framework in which to question whether SMEs take-up of tax credits has actually led to an increase in product, service, or process innovations. Our evidence suggests that (a) SME engagement with the policy is fairly randomly distributed across the sector, and (b) there is little additional product–service innovation to justify the expenditure in foregone taxes given the current distribution of credits, but (c) there is evidence of enhanced radical process innovations, particularly when combined with strong capability and planning at the firm level.
    • The zones of fragility: outlaws and the forms of violence in the Ottoman Empire

      Cayli, Baris; University of Derby (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2016-09-21)
      This study explores the relationship between violence and power through examining the archival documents about the outlaws in the Ottoman Empire from 1852 to 1876. I argue that the outlaws and the use of violence in the public sphere defied the power of the Ottoman Empire. Thereof, the present study agrees with the main thesis of Hannah Arendt about the destructive influence of violence on power. However, I take Hannah Arendt's argument on violence one step further by claiming that the form of violence -whether political or non-political- loses its significance when both public safety and state sovereignty are under great threats at the same time in the zones of fragility.
    • 가족수당 (Family Allowances in UK)

      Lee, Sung-Hee; University of Derby (Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 2017)