• Relationship between routines of supplier selection and evaluation, risk perception and propensity to form buyer–supplier partnerships

      Gallear, David; Ghobadian, Abby; He, Qile; Kumar, Vikas; Hitt, Michael; Brunel University London; University of Reading; University of Derby; University of the West of England; Texas A&M University (Taylor and Francis, 2021-01-25)
      Supply chain partnership is viewed as an important contributor to superior competitiveness, yet the knowledge of ex-ante factors contributing to the deployment of supply chain partnership is nascent. This paper examines the influence of the current supplier selection routines, supplier evaluation routines, and managerial attitude towards relational and performance risks on the future intention to form buyer–supplier partnerships, based on relational and evolutionary economics theory. The analysis is based on 156 questionnaires received from senior executives and supply/logistics managers of UK firms. We found that partner selection routine positively influences firms’ propensity (future intention) to form buyer–supplier partnerships, unlike the supplier evaluation routine and perceptions of both relational risk and performance risk, which were not found to have a significant role. Our findings suggest that firms wishing to initiate buyer–supplier partnerships can increase the likelihood of doing so by ensuring that their supplier selection routines incorporate efforts to establish potential suppliers’ inclination for openness in a relationship, to establish their track record of demonstrating a high degree of integrity with other buyers, and to confirm that potential suppliers have a deep knowledge and understanding of the buyer’s business, a recognized strong reputation, and demonstrable financial stability.
    • Religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and wales religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and Wales: interim findings and emergent themes

      Weller, Paul; Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Research Programme Podcasts, 2012-09-05)
      Issues around discrimination and equality in religion or belief are sensitive and highly contested, involving freedom of conscience and speech; religious activity in community and public life; employer and service provider responsibilities. They connect with understandings of religion, social policy and the law. Put alongside issues of gender and sexual orientation, there has often been tension and conflict. The “Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice (2000-2010)” research project is in its final year. It aims to be a benchmark study, including comparison with results of 1999-2001 research on “Religious Discrimination in England in Wales”. The completed research includes a national questionnaire survey of religious organisations and fieldwork among religious, public, private and voluntary sector groups (including focus groups with the “non-religious”). Review of legal cases and policy developments continues while a review on religious discrimination evidence was published in 2011 by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/research_report_73_religious_discrimination.pdf). At the conference it will be possible to present some provisional findings and emergent themes which will then be tested further during Autumn 2012 in a series of Knowledge Exchange Workshops with practitioners from the public, private, voluntary, religion and belief, and legal sectors.
    • Religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and wales religion and belief, discrimination and equality in England and Wales: interim findings and emergent themes

      Weller, Paul; Contractor, Sariya; University of Derby (2012-09-05)
      Issues around discrimination and equality in religion or belief are sensitive and highly contested, involving freedom of conscience and speech; religious activity in community and public life; employer and service provider responsibilities. They connect with understandings of religion, social policy and the law. Put alongside issues of gender and sexual orientation, there has often been tension and conflict. The “Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice (2000-2010)” research project is in its final year. It aims to be a benchmark study, including comparison with results of 1999-2001 research on “Religious Discrimination in England in Wales”. The completed research includes a national questionnaire survey of religious organisations and fieldwork among religious, public, private and voluntary sector groups (including focus groups with the “non-religious”). Review of legal cases and policy developments continues while a review on religious discrimination evidence was published in 2011 by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/research_report_73_religious_discrimination.pdf). At the conference it will be possible to present some provisional findings and emergent themes which will then be tested further during Autumn 2012 in a series of Knowledge Exchange Workshops with practitioners from the public, private, voluntary, religion and belief, and legal sectors.
    • Religion and belief, equality and inequality in UK higher education

      Weller, Paul; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-07-22)
    • Religion and belief-related hate incidents in higher education: a research and evaluation report

      Aune, Kristin; Peacock, Lucy; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; Weller, Paul; Coventry University (Coventry University, 2019)
      The research report is informed by the findings of two surveys, both of which were available both online and on paper. The surveys aimed to recruit as many Coventry University students as were interested in participating, including distance learning students, across all of its campuses. The baseline survey - which secured 612 useable responses - aimed at understanding Coventry University students’ attitudes to, direct experiences of, and experiences of witnessing hate incidents related to religion or belief, irrespective of whether or not they are themselves religious or subscribe to a particular belief system. The follow-up survey (which secured 286 responses) aimed to assess the impact of the project, including of the religion and other harassment case manager’s work, in raising the visibility of religion or belief hate crime and hate crime reporting. While the numbers involved in the surveys are too small for statistically reliable conclusions to be drawn, the results taken across the two surveys have indicative value.
    • Religion and state in marriage, cohabitation and civil partnership

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Springer Verlag, 2015)
      I explore several case studies on the relationship between the state, marriage, cohabitation and civil partnership as points of intersection between religious tradition, personal belief and commitment, familial and social belonging, the conditions of modernity, and the structures and laws of modern bureaucratic states. The first example highlights the plurality of legal traditions that can exist within single polities by referencing the historic example of Greta Green in Scotland where, historically, young people under marriageable age in English law eloped and married under Scots law. The second is the controversy generated in the UK in 2007 when the then Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, explored whether some personal law aspects of the Muslim Shariah might be recognized within English law. Next I outline some of the principal meanings attributed to marriage particularly by Christianity in Europe, and where Christian views are generally contractual, companionate or sacramental. In most societies informed by Christianity, the principal form has been monogamy between a man and a woman. There is sharp debate and controversy around emergent forms for the public recognition of relationships between individuals of homosexual and lesbian sexual orientation. What are often popularly called gay marriages highlight the more general problematics involved in questions how marriage, cohabitation and civil partnership are handled in relation to religion, tradition and modernity. Most social, legal and state systems include elements of more than one model and it is unlikely that any one model will be suitable in all circumstances. At issue are how far the state can and/or should impose unitary legal and social policy frameworks and what exceptions and plural approaches can be accepted and implemented? I argue for the development of an appropriate religious literacy among policy makers and civil servants who deal with the above issues. This is not on the basis that social policy and legal developments should necessarily endorse religious perspectives, but because democratic societies need to be capable of connecting with the perspectives and realities of those who organize their personal and social lives according to such perspectives.
    • Religious freedom in the Baptistic vision and in Fethullah Gülen: Resources for Muslims and Christians.

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Blue Dome Press, 2017-07-10)
      The chapter explores the place of religious freedom in both the Baptistic vision of Christianity and the teaching of the Turkish Muslim scholar, Fethullah Gulen. It does so by outlining the historic roots of the Baptistic vision of religious freedom in an England in which one form of Christianity was the established religion, and of Fethullah Gulen's teaching on religious freedom, emerging as it does out of the crucible of modern Turkish society and its encounter with the "secular". Also uncovered are their specific epistemological and hermeneutical roots which are discussed in relation the imperatives that both Islam and Christianity have towards Muslim "dawah" and Christian witness/mission. All of this leads into a summative critical discussion of the way in which both the Baptistic vision and Gulen's teachings on religious freedom can act as positive resources in the development of a plural and global society in which the exercise of religious freedom can take place in ways appropriate to a healthy relationship between the state and civil society, including the religious believers within it.
    • Religious minorities and freedom of religion or belief in the UK

      Weller, Paul; Coventry University; University of Derby; Regent's Park College, University of Oxford (Brill, 2018-03-27)
      By particular reference to the polity of the UK, this article discusses issues and options for groups identified as "religious minorities" in relation to issues of "religious freedom". It does so by seeking to ensure that such contemporary socio-legal discussions are rooted empirically in the full diversity of the UK's contemporary religious landscape, while taking account of (especially) 19th century (mainly Christian) historical antecedents. It argues that properly to understand the expansion in scope and substance of religious freedom achieved in the 19th century that account needs to be taken of the agency of the groups that benefited from this. Finally, it argues this history can be seen as a "preconfiguration" of the way in which religious minorities have themselves acted as key drivers for change in relevant 20th and 21st century UK law and social policy and could continue to do so in possible futures post-Brexit Referendum.
    • Religious organizations and the impact of human rights and equality laws in England and Wales.

      Kingsley, Purdam; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; Ghanea, Nazila; Weller, Paul; University of Manchester (2017-03-21)
      The framework for equality and the multiple aspects of identity that are protected in law, including on the basis of religion and belief, are continuously being redefined and reshaped through ongoing legal claims in England and Wales. In this article, we examine how religious organizations view equality and the extent to which different identity rights can be protected. We conducted a survey of religious organizations in England and Wales to examine attitudes and experiences in relation to changes in the equality laws. We found that equality is variously understood and many religious organizations give only limited recognition to certain legally protected characteristics including gender, sexual orientation and also the identities of other religious organizations. If the integration of equality in the form of identity rights is to be fully achieved within the legal framework of a liberal democratic state and alongside so-called British values, both religious and non-religious citizens alike need to take a greater responsibility for the understanding and recognition of identity differences. Equalities legislation is creating a constitutional framework for citizenship and it is important this new citizenship is structured around equality in practice at the individual and organizational level.
    • Remote working in academia: a site of contested identities.

      Lee, Amanda; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2018-09-01)
      This development paper discusses the affects and impact of formalised remote (location-independent) working on notions and construction of academic identity. Data is drawn from a six year longitudinal ethnographic study exploring the lived experiences of location-independent and office-based academics. Findings suggest academic identities are being dynamically recreated, with a more or less conscious awareness of how this is being done. The organisational decision to formalise location-independent working (LIW) led to a distinct group of academics identifying themselves as ‘LIW’ and office-based academics identifying themselves as distinct from their LIW colleagues. The dynamic interplay between LIW and office-based academics resulted in contested identities between these two groups. Despite these manufactured and socially constructed divisions, both groups identified strongly with the notion of an overarching academic identity. As such, the notion of academic identity was not contested, but it was seen as threatened and, potentially weakened, by the prevailing managerialist culture.
    • Renewing Criminalized and Hegemonic Cultural Landscapes

      Cayli, Baris; University of Stirling (2014)
      The Mafia's long historical pedigree in Mezzogiorno, Southern Italy, has empowered the Mafioso as a notorious, uncontested, and hegemonic figure. The counter-cultural resistance against the mafiosi culture began to be institutionalized in the early 1990s. Today, Libera Terra is the largest civil society organization in the country that uses the lands confiscated from the Mafia as a space of cultural repertoire to realize its ideals. Deploying labor force through volunteer participation, producing biological fruits and vegetables, and providing information to the students on the fields are the principal cultural practices of this struggle. The confiscated lands make the Italian experience of anti-Mafia resistance a unique example by connecting the land with the ideals of cultural change. The sociocultural resistance of Libera Terra conveys a political message through these practices and utters that the Mafia is not invincible. This study draws the complex panorama of the Mafia and anti-Mafia movement that uses the ‘confiscated lands’ as cultural and public spaces for resistance and socio-cultural change. In doing so, this article sheds new light on the relationship between rural criminology and crime prevention policies in Southern Italy by demonstrating how community development practice of Libera Terra changes the meaning of landscape through iconographic symbolism and ethnographic performance.
    • Repeat victimisation.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; Loughborough University (Routledge, 2016-11-01)
    • Research note: Developing ethnographic research on probation

      Teague, Michael; Teesside University (De Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam University, 2007)
      Huge cultural changes are underway in probation. At the heart of those changes lie the frontline practitioners who have the daily task of working with offenders. Yet, amidst the plethora of research on probation practice, much of it officially sponsored, the life experiences and motivations of practitioners seem on occasion to be virtually invisible. Some research has been carried out on practitioners’ experience of specific areas (for example, OASys), but very little broad ethnographic research has been undertaken on UK probation practitioners. While much of our academic and criminological knowledge about probation is filtered through officially funded research on particular types of intervention, little is known of probation’s occupational culture. It is argued that ethnographic research with practitioners would substantially enhance our understanding of that occupational culture and help develop our understanding of probation.
    • Research on making the most of HS2 investments and connectivity in the EM Labour Market.

      Nunn, Alex; Hutchinson, Jo; Hobson, Chris; Clark, Elaine; University of Derby; East Midlands Chamber; Rail Forum East Midlands (East Midlands Councils, 2017-05)
    • Researching entrepreneurship: an approach to develop subjective understanding

      Rajasinghe, Duminda; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; AFG College with University of Aberdeen, Doha, Qatar (Emerald, 2021-04-29)
      Entrepreneurship is a complex social activity. Hence, knowledge production in the field requires inclusivity and diversity within research approaches and perspectives to appreciate the richness of the phenomenon. However, the dominance of positivist research in the field is visible, and the current qualitative research is also predominantly restricted to popular templates. This seems to have limited the understanding of entrepreneurship. This paper critically discusses the appropriateness of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as an innovative qualitative research methodology that facilitates a fuller appreciation of the richness and diversity of entrepreneurship. This conceptual paper critically evaluates IPA's relevance for the stated purpose by reviewing both entrepreneurship and IPA literature. It discusses how IPA's philosophical underpinnings facilitate scholars to appreciate the wholeness of the phenomenon and provides literature informed data analysis guidance, thereby addressing some of the weaknesses of the qualitative research within the field. Critical evaluation of the literature suggests that IPA is an appropriate research methodology for entrepreneurship. It has the potential to address some interesting and timely questions to elaborate, deepen and qualify existing theory or to study relatively unexplored areas within the field. The laid-out guidance helps scholars to develop informed rationale for their research decisions and to ensure quality and rigour in qualitative research. This paper promotes the analysis of how people make sense of their experience as a valid way of knowing. IPA has a unique identity as it incorporates phenomenology, hermeneutics and idiography as a way to explore first-hand human experience to uncover qualitative understanding of entrepreneurship. The clear guidance and justifications in the paper promote scholarly confidence and address some preconceptions related to rigour, quality and validity of qualitative studies. Incorporating IPA into entrepreneurship, the paper also contributes to the demand for diversity, inclusivity and pluralism in qualitative research perspectives and approaches.
    • A resource based approach in the context of the emerging craft brewing industry

      Alonso, Abel Duarte; Bressan, Alessandro; Sakellarios, Nikolaos; University of Derby (2016-08-08)
    • Return to Palestine

      Shakkour, Suha; University of Derby (Ashgate, 2015)
      To begin to comprehend the complexity of life in exile for Palestinians, it is important to first recognise that for many the desire to return is not rooted simply in a return to the homeland, but to a particular region and, specifically, to their former houses. In a sense, these houses – of which the majority were either appropriated by Jewish-Israelis (and in some cases, by internally displaced Palestinians) or destroyed in 1948 – serve as place markers in history, the moment of exile forever preserved within their walls. Thus, for their original owners, a return to them is considered a return to their ‘authentic selves’, that is, to their pre-exilic identities. Given this, it comes as no surprise that the keys and deeds to these houses are carefully guarded and passed down along with the memories of the sights, sounds, and smells they evoke in the first generation of exiles. This first generation is comprised of an estimated 726,000 Palestinians who were displaced in the 1948 Nakba, and later the nearly 300,000 in the 1967 Naksa. While those who had more resources (e.g. an education or financial resources) were able to exercise more choice in terms of destination, many remained in neighbouring Arab countries hoping to return to their homes when the political situation was resolved. Today, more than 60 years later, the vast majority continue to wait.
    • Review of survey methods in events management research

      Fletcher, Richard; Bostock, James; University of Derby; De Montfort University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019)
      Questionnaire-based surveys are a common data collection tool in events research as established by earlier reviews of methods within the literature. This paper examines and critiques the historic development, current position, gaps in knowledge and future implications for survey-based research. Some diversity is found within survey-based research, however the majority was carried out: as a single method (86%), in physical proximity to the event (67%), during the event (49%), using paper-based forms (65%), designed for self-completion (94%). The event types most commonly targeted were: Sports (43%) Festivals & Celebrations (20%) and Music (12%). The stakeholders targeted were: Audiences (54%), Non-participants (16%) and Managers (12%). Sampling methods, where stated, were likely to be random (23%) or convenience based (22%). Despite the predominance of this data collection tool, numerous areas are ideally in need of further understanding and experimentation. Priorities for future survey-based research are in using mixed methods, multiple surveys, electronic surveys, more deliberate approaches to sampling overall; specifically sampling both before and after events. Targeting stakeholders other than audiences and covering a broader range of events may also be desirable. Emerging technologies and a typology of survey-based research are discussed. The use of survey-based research by policy makers and funders is discussed under the label of ‘operationalised knowledge management’.
    • Revisiting International Public Sector Accounting Standards Adoption in Developing Countries

      Boolaky Doorgakunt, Lakshi D; Omoteso, Kamil; Mirosea, Nitri; Boolaky, Pran Krishansing; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2021-06-06)
      Based on a comprehensive review of recent studies on IPSAS adoption around the globe, we develop in this article a conceptual model to examine alternative predictors of adoption for developing countries. Drawing from this framework, we develop a rigorous econometric modelling on the impact of legal, political and accounting environments in the developing countries’ drive for IPSAS adoption. Contrary to what existing literature projects, our study reveals that a country’s IFRS and ISA experience is more important and significant drivers of IPSAS adoption compared to IFRS adoption. Likewise, political system, regulatory enforcement, lenders and borrowers’ rights and the level of corruption in a country also influence IPSAS adoption.
    • Revisiting Margaret Thatcher’s law and order agenda: The slow-burning fuse of punitiveness.

      Farrall, Stephen; Burke, Naomi; Hay, Colin; University of Sheffield; Centre d'études européennes de Sciences Po (2015-08-24)
      In recent years, criminologists have devoted growing attention to the extent to which ‘punitiveness’ is emerging as a central feature of many criminal justice systems. In gauging punitiveness, these studies typically rely either on attitudinal data derived from surveys that measure individual support for punitive sentences or on the size of the prison population. We take a different approach, exploring the aims, content and outcomes of various Acts of Parliament passed between 1982 and 1998 in England and Wales. Our argument is that while a trend towards punitiveness is detectable, this was, in the case of England and Wales, attributable to wider discourses stemming from the New Right of the 1980s. This in turn promoted a new conception of how best to tackle rising crime. We show that while the year 1993 stands out as a key point in the growing trajectory of punitiveness in England and Wales, the ideas and rhetoric around ‘toughness’ in the criminal justice system can be traced back much further than this. Our article brings these matters to the attention of political scientists and demonstrates how historical institutionalist thinking can guide and inform interdisciplinary work at the interface between political science and criminology.