• Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • Pre-colonial legal system in Africa: an assessment of indigenous laws of Benin kingdom before 1897

      Ojo, Idahosa Osagie; Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby; University of Leeds (State University of New York, 2020)
      There were salient novelties in the legal system of the Benin Kingdom and other areas in pre-colonial Africa that promoted justice, peace, and order among people and communities. Special provisions such as collective responsibility in legal personality, the law of primogeniture, the fusion of laws and religion in theory and practice, and the recognition of societal status and political position in legal proceedings amongst other legal concepts were incorporated into the body of laws in Benin. Previous intellectual efforts center on the political, economic, and social aspects of history, largely neglecting these legal dynamics and other vital areas of the kingdom's organization. Hence, this study analyzes indigenous legal concepts in the Benin Kingdom using several varieties of primary and secondary sources. It contends that Benin, like other African societies, developed practical and useful legal concepts that helped in the consolidation of peace and harmony throughout its length and breadth, and that these indigenous Benin legal concepts were in force till 1897.
    • Presumed consent in organ donation: is the duty finally upon us?

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (2010)
    • Preventing crime and evoking altruism.

      Pease, Ken; University College London (Springer, 2014)
      The chapter describes the current movement towards the integration of a wider range of science disciplines in the understanding and prevention of crime. Circumstances have led to that integration being furthest advanced in collaborative research of crime scientists with mathematicians and geographers, among others. The sub-discipline of positive psychology, with its theoretical underpinnings in evolutionary theory, is identified as a promising partner in the burgeoning of crime science.
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; University College London (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Privacy as personal resistance: exploring legal narratology and the need for a legal architecture for personal privacy rights

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (University of Idaho College of Law, 2011)
      Different cultures produce different privacies – both architecturally and legally speaking – as well as in their different legal architectures. The ‘Simms principle’ can be harnessed to produce semi-constitutional privacy protection through statute; building on the work already done in ‘bringing rights home’ through the Human Rights Act 1998. This article attempts to set out a notion of semi-entrenched legal rights, which will help to better portray the case for architectural, constitutional privacy, following an examination of the problems with a legal narrative for privacy rights as they currently exist. I will use parallel ideas from the works of W.B. Yeats and Costas Douzinas to explore and critique these assumptions and arguments. The ultimate object of this piece is an argument for the creation of a legal instrument, namely an Act of Parliament, in the United Kingdom; the purpose of which is to protect certain notions of personal privacy from politically-motivated erosion and intrusion.
    • Privatising criminal justice: a step too far?

      Teague, Michael; Teesside University (The Criminal Justice Alliance, 2012-05)
      Prisons have been in the vanguard of the shift towards privatisation in the justice arena in the UK, which currently has the most privatised prison system in Europe. In an era of acute fiscal tightening, private incarceration's capacity to grow shareholder profits while simultaneously saving taxpayers money is presented as attractive. Competition for the running of criminal and community justice services - prisons, policing and probation - reflects the inexorable process of ideologically driven marketisation. A relentless process of transforming our criminal justice system into a competitive market place in which the attainment of financial return, rather than social justice, is the primary driver is underway.
    • Probation in America: armed, private and unaffordable?

      Teague, Michael; Teesside University (Sage, 2011)
      While America is renowned for its enormous prison industrial complex, less academic attention has been paid to the state of probation intervention. The probation population has long been rising more swiftly than the prison population, and one in 45 adults in the USA is now subject to community upervision. This article explores the development of American probation and considers a series of key contextual issues, including the fragmented nature of the US probation system and the philosophies which underpin it, supervision fees, privatization, and the arming of probation officers, in order to illuminate how the community corrections system functions. The Justice Reinvestment initiative is also considered, and the impact of budgetary pressures upon probation is taken into account.
    • Probation in England: a culture in a state of flux

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (American Society of Criminology, 2015-11)
      This paper focuses on probation culture in England, and the practitioner's construction of frontline probation practice. After 108 years as a public sector agency, probation in England is being fundamentally remodelled by a radical shift to privatisation. A process of ideologically-driven marketisation is transforming the community justice system into a competitive market place. This shift reflects the neoliberal political, social and economic forces shaping probation policy and practice. A concomitant cultural shift is being engendered as the last vestiges of the social welfarist ethos which underpinned intervention are apparently subsumed under a discourse focused on compliance, enforcement, actuarial risk assessment, and managerialism. A range of frontline probation practitioners are interviewed. Insight is gained into their understanding of punishment and rehabilitation. Probation’s cultural shift away from a model rooted in social welfarism, towards its re-framing as an agency which is altogether more punitive, is analysed. Despite the official depiction of probation as revolving around the fulcrum of enforcement, frontline practitioners adhered to their conception of the Probation Service as an agency in which the primacy of rehabilitation was fundamental; punishment was not viewed as a priority. Despite the multiple pressures, frontline practice has not, overall, been fundamentally redrawn.
    • Probation occupational cultures for the future

      Burke, Lol; Teague, Michael; Ward, David; Worrall, Anne; Liverpool John Moore University; University of Derby; De Montfort University; Keele University (De Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam University, 2016-03-15)
      This article is based on a discussion, between the four co-authors, that took place over two days during the 'Conversation with Paul Senior' in Kendal in January 2016. Conscious that we have each undertaken research into aspects of occupational cultures in Probation and Social Work, we spent some time on the first day devising questions that we might ask ourselves in order to imagine what occupational cultures in Probation might be like in 2020.
    • Probation, people and profits: the impact of neoliberalism

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (De Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam University, 2016-03-15)
      Probation's original reintegrative ethos is being eroded by neoliberal policies and the formation of a systematically marketised environment. There can now be little doubt that a momentous cultural shift is being engendered as probation is propelled swiftly down the road of privatization. The pace of change is fast. While this is a partial privatization (those assessed as posing the highest risk remain subject to public sector supervision), the eventual endgame of neoliberal political philosophy may be total privatization. Regardless of the rehabilitative rhetoric, the reality may be that the privatization of probation is about the deprioritisation of rehabilitation and penal-welfare intervention.
    • The Problems of Starmerism

      Burton-Cartledge, Phil; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-05-06)
      The 2017 and 2019 general elections showed a strong bedrock of Labour support among the working age population and particularly the under thirties. This is a consequence both of long-term changes to the composition of class cohorts, political events, and the experience of a decade of Conservative governments, whose policies have shielded the retired and the elderly. These conditions have not changed and, under the impact of Covid-19 are, if anything, sharpening. The challenge of the Labour Party's new leadership under Keir Starmer is keeping hold of this crucial component of the party's electoral coalition while making inroads into Tory support. Initial movement in the polls suggests he is on course for achieving the latter, but positions taken on Black Lives Matter, the government's coronavirus strategy, and a managerialist oppositional style recalls the triangulation strategy associated with the Blair years. This article considers the possibilities and dangers of adopting this approach.
    • The production and reproduction of inequality in the UK in times of austerity

      Nunn, Alex; University of Derby (SpringerPalgrave Macmillan, 2016-11-29)
      Inequality appears to be back on the intellectual and political agenda. This paper provides a commentary on this renewed interest, drawing on an empirical discussion of inequality in the UK. The paper argues that inequality should be seen as produced in the inherently unequal social relations of production, drawing attention to the role of social struggle in shaping dynamics of inequality. However, inequality is not just produced in dynamic class struggle in the formal economy, but also through the social reproduction of labour power on a day-to-day and inter-generational basis. As such, inequalities of household resources at any point in time may be reproductive of greater future inequality. It is argued that inequality has risen in the UK over recent decades because of changes in the social relations of production in the formal economy and social reproduction in the domestic sector, both of which have witnessed significant state interventions that have increased structural inequalities. It is argued that, absent of significant change, the underpinning structural dynamics in the UK will lead to further increases in inequality over the short and longer-term. Given this, we might expect to see an already emergent ‘New Politics of Inequality’ intensifying in the coming decades.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: critical link between satisfaction and place attachment in Australia and Canada

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 23/03/2017)
      This study explores issues of scale equivalence and generalizability in national parks. Visitors' place satisfaction, proenvironmental behavior, and place attachment are measured across two qualitatively distinct populations in Australia and Canada. Techniques employed in this cross-country study bring an important contribution to tourism research. The primary focus is to establish measure equivalence before undertaking hypothesis testing using structural equation modeling on a sample of 339 repeat visitors at the Dandenong Ranges National Park, Australia, and 296 repeat visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Canada. Results from both samples indicate (a) there is measure equivalence between the Australian and Canadian samples allowing comparability of findings, (b) a positive and significant effect of visitor place satisfaction on proenvironmental behavioral intentions, (c) a significant and positive influence of proenvironmental behavioral intention on place attachment (place identity, place dependence, place social bonding, place affect), and (d) a significant and negative effect of visitor place satisfaction on place social bonding. The main finding relates to the promotion of proenvironmental behaviors among national park users that—in addition to individual benefits—provides environmental sustainability as well as practical benefits for park managers and society.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: the link between place attachment and place satisfaction.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 01/12/2014)
      The study tested whether proenvironmental behavioral intention mediates the relationship between place attachment and place satisfaction among visitors of the Dandenong Ranges National Park in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed on a sample of 452 visitors. Regression models were estimated to test the mediating effect of proenvironmental behavioral intentions on the relationships between place dependence, place identity, place affect, place social bonding, and place satisfaction. Results show that as hypothesized, these effects were mediated by proenvironmental behavioral intentions, except for the relationship between place social bonding and place satisfaction. An important theoretical contribution is the mediating role of proenvironmental behavioral intentions in nature-based settings. Practical applications of the study include marketing aimed at encouraging repeat visitation by increasing levels of place attachment and place satisfaction in national parks through proenvironmental message development and delivery.
    • Profit, planet and people in supply chain: grand challenges and future opportunities

      Taghikhah, Firouzeh; Daniel, Jay; Mooney, Grant; University of Technology Sydney (AIS Electronic Library (AISeL), 2017)
      Recent pressure from governments and customers on supply chain organizations to consider environmental and social issues has increased dramatically. The challenge ahead for supply chain managers is how to grow business profit while protecting the planet and respecting people’s rights. The significance of this issue motivates researchers in the fields of “sustainability” and “supply chain” to further integrate these concepts. To identify affected areas, and how sustainability influences them, this research has employed a literature survey of related papers published between 2012 and 2016 within 16 A* indexed journals that are relevant to Information and Computing Science, Transportation/Freight Services and Manufacturing Engineering. Findings show that sustainable supply chain network structure, impact factors, relationship integration and performance evaluation are the main research topics in these streams. The role of decision-making tools within each discipline, the key methodologies and techniques are discussed. Generally speaking, primary challenges in the sustainable supply chain domain devolve from use of inadequate decision-making tools and inappropriate information systems. The holistic picture presented in this paper is important for helping scholars, system developers, and supply chain analysts to become more aware of current grand challenges and future research opportunities within this field.
    • Profiting from the Poor: Offender-funded probation in the USA

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (De Montfort University and Sheffield Hallam University, 2016-03-15)
      The privatization of probation provision in England and Wales is now neither tentative nor experimental. Offender-funded probation in America is an inevitable by-product of the introduction of market forces into probation, and a significant growth area. A comparative analysis of the delivery of privatized, offender-funded probation in the USA is employed in order to illuminate one possible future trajectory for probation in England and Wales. The experience of service users in southern US states is considered, as is the evidence indicating an insufficiently regulated and privatized system which is primarily driven by revenue generation rather than rehabilitation. While many US privatized probation companies operate in a principled way, a number of cases involving these companies have culminated in the incarceration of service users who were unable to afford supervision fees. When a privatized company’s survival depends on its ability to raise revenue, this may impact on the quality of intervention and the experience of service users. We are not yet at a point where offender-funded intervention is advocated in England. Nevertheless, there is a need to further reflect upon ethical, fiscal, political and practice issues before we irrevocably commit probation further down its current path.
    • Promoting effectiveness of “working from home”: findings from Hong Kong working population under COVID-19

      Wong, A. H. K.; Cheung, J. O.; Chen, Z.; Lingnan University, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2020-10-26)
      Working-from-home (WFH) practice has been adopted by many companies of a variety of industries in a diverse manner; however, it is not until the recent outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic WFH gains worldwide popularity. With so many different views out there and based on work–family balance theory, this study aims to find out the factors which affect peoples' WFH effectiveness and whether they want the extended WFH practice when the pandemic crisis is over. This paper adopted an online survey approach by posting questionnaires on the university website and different social media channels to collect views from full-time Hong Kong workers who have had WFH experience during the coronavirus outbreak. A total of 1,976 effective responses were collected for the data analysis. The findings of this study indicate that WFH effectiveness is improved by personal and family well-being but reduced by environmental and resource constraints. When workers are experiencing higher WFH effectiveness, they have a higher preference for WFH even after the pandemic; the female workers preferred WFH twice per week, while the male workers more often preferred WFH once per week. Finally, workers from the management and the self-employed levels demonstrated a lower preference for WFH, compared to the front-line and middle-grade workers. This paper fulfils to provide a timely reflection on workers' post-pandemic WFH preference, the factors affecting their WFH effectiveness and the demographic differences inducing to the differentiated preferences.