• The politics of fear: Religion(s), conflict and diplomacy

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016)
      As historical phenomena, religions (as well as ideologies) have played varied and often ambiguous roles in the context of international relations, violent conflicts, peace-making and diplomacy (Ferguson, 1977; Haynes, 1988), and especially so at the interface between civilisations informed by Christianity and those informed by Islam (Armstrong, 1988; Partner, 1997). This paper focuses on aspects of those roles as the context for these has changed over the past half a century within the context of a broader setting shaped by what has come to be known as the “politics of fear” (Furedi, 2006), originally shaped by the threat of nuclear Mutually Assured Destruction and now by the threat of global terror attacks.
    • The politics of migration in the UK from an artist's perspective - a conversation place No. 6, with a French artist Chris Dugrenier on migration and dance streamed live on May 5, 2015

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Dance4, 2015)
      In this video, Dr Francis Jegede from the University of Derby and a Latin Dance enthusiast, explores the intersection of International Relations, Dance and Politics within the context of current debate and controversies surrounding the issue of migration in the UK. The video was produced by Dance4 under their Conversation Place project. A Conversation Place is a Dance4 project that brings together intriguing and provoking combinations of people who wouldn't normally meet face-to-face to shine a new light on the discourse that surrounds contemporary dance and choreographic practice. Project was set up with the hope that brief glimpses of the lives and ideas of Dance4 guest speakers and friends, shared online, can open up different perspectives on social issues and challenges facing society in Great Britain and beyond. Dance4 is an international centre for the development of extraordinary 21st century dance. A unique voice in the UK dance sector. Their work supports artists and practitioners who are interested in the development of dance as a tool for community development.
    • Politics, research design, and the ‘architecture’ of criminal careers studies

      Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-04-22)
      Criminal careers research is one of the bedrocks – if not the bedrock – of criminology. It remains a key focal point of criminological research, and has embraced ideas and theorising from sociology, psychology, psychiatry and urban and community studies. Despite the widening of the landscape of what might be termed ‘the criminological enterprise’ (to include victimology, prisons research, punishment, deterrence, and environmental criminology), criminal careers (now differentiated into studies of onset, persistence and desistance) remains a key plank of criminology. This article critiques the research design of longitudinal studies of criminal careers, arguing that a key explanatory factor has been consistently overlooked in criminal careers research, due, in part, to the research design of such studies. In focussing on the role of politically-motivated changes to economic policies and the re-structuring of the industrial base this produced, I empirically relate individual offending careers to politics in way very few have done before. The article touches upon a series of suggestions for how empirical studies of criminal careers might be improved.
    • Politics, social and economic change and crime: exploring the impact of contextual effects on offending trajectories

      Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Jones, Phillip Mike; University of Derby (Sage, 2020-08-11)
      Do government policies increase the likelihood that some citizens will become persistent criminals? What is the role of other organisations and institutions in mediating offending over the life-course? Using concepts derived from criminology (such as the idea of a ‘criminal career’, an individual’s repeated, longitudinal sequence of offending), and concepts such as the life-course from sociology, this paper assesses the outcome of macro-level economic policies on individuals’ engagement in crime from age 10 to 30. Whilst many studies have explored the impact of 1980s ‘New Right’ governments on welfare spending, housing and the economy, few studies in political science, sociology or criminology have directly linked macro-economic policies to individual offending careers. Employing individual-level longitudinal data, we track a sample of Britons born in 1970 from childhood to adulthood, examining their offending trajectories between ages 10 and 30, and hence through a period of dramatic economic and social change in the UK throughout the early-1980s, during which the economy was dramatically restructured. As such, we are primarily concerned with the effects of economic policies on an individual’s repeated offending. Using data from the British 1970 Birth Cohort Study, we develop a model that incorporates individuals, families and schools, and which takes account of national-level economic policies (which were driven by New Right political ideas) and which, we argue, shaped individual offending careers. Our paper suggests that processes of economic restructuring were a key causal factor in offending during this period. This broader framework also emphasises the importance of considering political and economic forces in criminal careers and related research. The paper therefore encourages criminologists to draw upon ideas from political science when developing explanations of offending careers, and shows how the choices over the political management of the economy encourage individual-level responses.
    • Population, resources and development

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 1996)
      Award-winning geography text covers the following themes: global wealth distribution, debt and aid; population structure, dynamics and migration; development strategies and population policies; industrialization and employment; and energy resources, commodities and trade. National Book Award - this book won the Geographical Association’s Silver Award - 1996.
    • Population, resources and development / 2nd. Ed.

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 2000)
      A completely revised edition of this popular A level text.This book covers: 1. Growth, wealth and happiness 2. Colonialism, dependency and aid 3. Population dynamics and structure 4. Population movements and urbanisation 5. Population policies and food supply 6. Human resources and industrialisation 7. Natural resources and development 8. World trade, commodities and communications 9. Regional development policies 10. Tourism as a development strategy 11. Alternative strategies for development
    • Portfolio of major events in Auckland: characteristics, perspectives and issues

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-11)
      Although event portfolios have become an integrated part of destination development, a lack of empirical research into the nature of portfolio design exists. A case study was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, to explore the nature of the applied portfolio strategy in the city. The findings indicate that Auckland employs an outcomes-driven approach which is characterised by the orientation on economic outcomes, an ‘agnostic’ attitude to the compositional structure of the portfolio, an intensive bidding campaign and leveraging strategies. The current city’s reputation awards, successful event bids and positive economic indicators justify this approach. The identified issues, including a supply-led nature of the event portfolio and its predominantly quantitative measures of success, call for a revalidation of the approach. The results of the study contribute to the ongoing discourse about the value of event portfolios and their sustainable design in different urban destinations.
    • Positive engagement through youth work: Working with Roma children and young people in Derby, supporting their wellbeing

      Henry, Philip M.; Williams, Simon; University of Derby (The Center of Research in Child-Parent Interaction (CICOP), 2015-06)
      This article concentrates on the experiences of mainly Slovak and Czech Roma young people and their families who make up the largest population of Roma currently residing in Derby in the UK. It examines the experiences of Roma young people supported by the Multi-Faith Centre at the University of Derby through its outreach organisation Roma Community Care and their partner agencies. The development of a youth work led approach engaging young Roma is designed to enhance the wellbeing of those young people, not just by providing diversionary activities, but also through its holistic support with whole families. The article draws on youth and community studies examining race and ethnicity unpacked through the medium of social identity. It culminates in an assessment of well being of the young people in the case study correlated with the positive engagement of youth work through informal education, examining the experiences of working directly with young people as well as the conceptual frameworks set out herein.
    • Post crisis tourism: attitudes and perceptions of the risk society traveller

      Mandelartz, Pascal; University of Derby (UniversityPublications.net, 2012)
      This paper investigates a tourist segment which has been created out of Ulrich Beck’s Risk Society (1989, 2009). These travellers have been dubbed ‘Risk Society Travellers’. The paper follows Beck’s arguments of a society in which everyday life is increasingly governed by risks that have become incalculable, uncompensatable, unlimited, unaccountable and, most important of all, invisible to our senses. The contention is that people live with permanent non-knowing or with the simultaneity of threats and non-knowing and cannot grasp which concerns one should have and in what situations. These problems of risk and uncertainty pose dilemmas for us all (Mythen and Walklate, 2006). Therefore the nature of the tourism experience is investigated, which this study is trying to connect to post crises tourism in order to gain further understanding of the people that travel to such destinations. During the current times of crisis, in which headlines of terror and catastrophes are predominant in the media, each and every one of us still has to make choices, whether to travel and where to travel. The historical discussions and theoretical development in tourism suggests that catastrophes, such as terrorism and natural disasters impact negatively on tourists’ perception of a destination and therefore have a negative impact on the demand for such destinations. However, tourism numbers are still rising and are forecasted to rise in the future (WTO, 2012). This paper sheds light on the travellers within today’s risk society by use of a case study from Morocco’s post terrorist incident that occurred on 28th April 2011, where the ambivalence by the traveller to the notion of risk contradicts these earlier concepts and research findings. The tourists visiting destinations post-crisis are truly ‘Risk Society Travellers'
    • Postcards from the cosmos: Cosmic spaces in alternative religion and conspiracy theories.

      Wilson, Andrew Fergus; University of Derby (Astrosociology Research Institute, 2017-08-28)
      If conspiracy theory is the narration of fears of existential dread, of a potentially apocalyptical plot against ‘us’, then we can understand alien conspiracies as a dread of the coming of ‘cosmological humanity’ and the end of ‘geostationary man’. In escaping gravity’s hold a terminal velocity is achieved by a species ready to mythologize, even sacralise, its achievements and to enchant the Heavens once again in terms more suited to the technological age. Virgiliu Pop’s astrosociology will provide a means for framing the uniqueness of post-Gagarin conspiracist spiritualities within the particular religious cultures of cosmic humanity whilst Raymond Williams’ concept of structures of feeling will be drawn upon to understand the cultural significance of these spiritualities.
    • Postgraduate Placement Toolkit

      Wond, Tracey; Rambukwella, Shan; Nesterova, Iana; Kelleher, Orla; University of Derby (2016-02)
      A 'Return on Investment' toolkit for HEI's to identify and quantify the benefits to employers of investing in postgraduate education. This was one of two toolkits funded by HEFCE under the Postgraduate Support Scheme.
    • The potential for craft brewing tourism development in the United States: a stakeholder view.

      Alonso, Abel Duarte; Sakellarios, Nikolaos; Liverpool John Moores University; Edith Cowan University; University of Derby; Liverpool Business School, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; School of Business, University of Derby, Derbyshire, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2016-07-22)
      The craft brewing industry is experiencing growth worldwide; however, research on this industry has been scant in various domains, including research exploring the relationships between craft breweries and tourism. This study contributes to extant academic literature, investigating the perceived potential and challenges of craft brewing tourism (CBT) among 221 micro/small United States craft brewing operators. The study adopts stakeholder theory (ST) as the theoretical framework. Overall, participants perceived the potential of CBT in their region/state. Pubs/bars selling locally crafted beer, packaged tours, beer–food pairings, tours, and trails were predominantly identified forms of CBT development, while limited logistics and lack of time were main perceived challenges. Various statistically significant differences were identified, particularly based on the level of production and age of the brewery. However, overall, most tests yielded similar levels of agreement. Alignments were revealed between the findings and ST’s theses, namely, descriptive, instrumental, normative, and managerial.
    • Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • The power of PES partnerships

      Davern, Eamonn; Nunn, Alex; Scoppetta, Anette; University of Derby; European Centre for Social Welfare (European Union, 2021-07)
      The labour market is changing very rapidly. Prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the labour mar- ket across Europe was performing strongly overall, and across most member states. Nevertheless, high levels of employment co-existed with some important problems such as inequalities of skills, employment, conditions and pay in relation to gender, ethnicity, disability and partic- ular challenges faced by specific social groups such as migrants or ex-offenders or some ethnic minorities (Eu- ropean Commission, 2020a). Young people have been particularly negatively affected by changes in job security and wages in the so called ‘gig economy’. The current COVID crisis is adding to these vulnerabili- ties, increasing unemployment generally and particular- ly among the insecurely employed, temporary workers, young people and the low to medium skilled. It has in- creased youth unemployment, and the rate of those Not in Employment, Education or Training and households have lost considerable income, especially at lower lev- els of the income distribution (European Commission, 2020b). Further, the range of anticipated future changes that go under the banner of ‘The Future of Work’ may further compound inequalities and insecurities faced by sections of the population. The OECD predicts that around 14% of jobs are at risk due to automation, with signifi- cant variation of this risk between OECD member states, between sectors and occupational roles, with workers in manufacturing, agriculture, food preparation or commu- nications occupations (postal, courier etc) most at risk (Nedelkoska, & Quintini, 2018). While new waves of au- tomation over the last decade have not yet led to signif- icant employment losses in any country, it is influencing" "employment growth between occupations and the skills demands within them. The lowest skilled are becoming more concentrated in the most vulnerable sectors and occupations (OECD, 2021). On the upside, technology acted to protect large numbers of jobs in the Covid 19 crisis, enabling workers to continue even when lockdowns prevented them physically going to work. The uptake of telework will likely lead to accelerated use of new tech- nology after the crisis. While recent job retention schemes have been effective at reducing and slowing redundancies and sustaining employment and business viability, they come at a cost to fiscal balances. The likelihood of slow output growth for several years and the need for further restorative public spending (for e.g., on physical and mental health and education services) will put public finances under considerable pressure for several years to come. All this will have an ongoing impact on PES and acceler- ate pressures that they were already experiencing and responding to. PES will need to continue to demonstrate increasing effectiveness and efficiency and deliver re- sults in helping the workforce and employers to adjust and ‘build back better’. One means of PES responding to the multiple challenges that they and the labour market face is through further development of partnerships. This will involve review of existing partnership arrangements and further learning from the many strong examples of PES facilitating closer working across organisational boundaries. By sharing good examples and best practice PES can highlight and encourage further positive en- gagement between stakeholders in enhancing social and labour market inclusion through delivery of increasingly citizen centric services.
    • Pre-colonial legal system in Africa: an assessment of indigenous laws of Benin kingdom before 1897

      Ojo, Idahosa Osagie; Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby; University of Leeds (State University of New York, 2020)
      There were salient novelties in the legal system of the Benin Kingdom and other areas in pre-colonial Africa that promoted justice, peace, and order among people and communities. Special provisions such as collective responsibility in legal personality, the law of primogeniture, the fusion of laws and religion in theory and practice, and the recognition of societal status and political position in legal proceedings amongst other legal concepts were incorporated into the body of laws in Benin. Previous intellectual efforts center on the political, economic, and social aspects of history, largely neglecting these legal dynamics and other vital areas of the kingdom's organization. Hence, this study analyzes indigenous legal concepts in the Benin Kingdom using several varieties of primary and secondary sources. It contends that Benin, like other African societies, developed practical and useful legal concepts that helped in the consolidation of peace and harmony throughout its length and breadth, and that these indigenous Benin legal concepts were in force till 1897.
    • Presumed consent in organ donation: is the duty finally upon us?

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (2010)
    • Preventing crime and evoking altruism.

      Pease, Ken; University College London (Springer, 2014)
      The chapter describes the current movement towards the integration of a wider range of science disciplines in the understanding and prevention of crime. Circumstances have led to that integration being furthest advanced in collaborative research of crime scientists with mathematicians and geographers, among others. The sub-discipline of positive psychology, with its theoretical underpinnings in evolutionary theory, is identified as a promising partner in the burgeoning of crime science.
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Leeds; University College London (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Preventing repeat and near repeat crime concentrations.

      Farrell, Graham; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-03-16)
    • Privacy as personal resistance: exploring legal narratology and the need for a legal architecture for personal privacy rights

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (University of Idaho College of Law, 2011)
      Different cultures produce different privacies – both architecturally and legally speaking – as well as in their different legal architectures. The ‘Simms principle’ can be harnessed to produce semi-constitutional privacy protection through statute; building on the work already done in ‘bringing rights home’ through the Human Rights Act 1998. This article attempts to set out a notion of semi-entrenched legal rights, which will help to better portray the case for architectural, constitutional privacy, following an examination of the problems with a legal narrative for privacy rights as they currently exist. I will use parallel ideas from the works of W.B. Yeats and Costas Douzinas to explore and critique these assumptions and arguments. The ultimate object of this piece is an argument for the creation of a legal instrument, namely an Act of Parliament, in the United Kingdom; the purpose of which is to protect certain notions of personal privacy from politically-motivated erosion and intrusion.