• Martial arts: the possible benefit that can be obtained during a period of lockdown

      Spring, Charles; University of Derby (Heriot Watt University, 2021-01-25)
      The following thought piece follows one individuals’ experience of being in lockdown in the United Kingdom and how the practice of martial arts assisted in this experience. Through the use of diary entries, their feelings and thoughts are expressed and how the bad ones of these are assisted through the practice and ability to focus on something other. There is a discussion that draws on other academic and authors perspectives, that evidence and support the thought pieces viewpoint. The piece concludes that practicing martial arts can help individuals through enabling them to have a focus and outlet to help cope with deeper emotional states caused by a situation such as lockdown.
    • Mass incarceration: the juggernaut of American penal expansionism

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2016-09)
      A plethora of evidence confirms that America continues to lead the world in imprisonment. No serious commentator doubts mass incarceration is a major issue for the nation. The America penal industrial complex incarcerates close to a quarter of all the prisoners on the planet. The American rate of incarceration remains stubbornly locked at a substantially higher level than those of comparable parliamentary democracies. There is no doubt that America’s penal institutions contain some individuals who pose a substantial public risk. However, there is significant scope to limit incarceration for a range of offenders, including those convicted of drug offences. There is a recognition the decades-long ‘War on Drugs’ has ultimately been counterproductive. At the end of 2014, some six years into Obama’s presidency, the USA’s total incarcerated population included some 2,306,100 prisoners It is only now that the United States may be witnessing the end of an ill-starred forty year experiment with mass incarceration and that American penal expansionism has finally begun to ease. The overall picture is of a pause, and even a slight reverse, in the race to incarcerate.
    • The meaning of "wrong" in the M'Naghten test

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (2009)
    • Measuring capital in active addiction and recovery: the development of the strengths and barriers recovery scale (SABRS)

      Best, David; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Nisic, Mulka; University of Derby; University of Ghent, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000, Ghent; Belgium Recovered Users Network, Rue Archimede 17, 1000, Brussels, Belgium (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-16)
      The international Life In Recovery (LiR) surveys have provided an important message to the public and policy makers about the reality of change from addiction to recovery, consistently demonstrating both that there are marked gains across a range of life domains and that the longer the person is in recovery the better their recovery strengths and achievements. However, to date, no attempt has been made to quantify the Life In Recovery scales and to assess what levels of change in removing barriers and building strengths is achieved at which point in the recovery journey. The current study undertakes a preliminary analysis of strengths and barriers from the Life in Recovery measure, using data from a European survey on drug users in recovery (n = 480), and suggests that the instrument can be edited into a Strengths And Barriers Recovery Scale (SABRS). The new scale provides a single score for both current recovery strengths and barriers to recovery. The resulting data analysis shows that there are stepwise incremental changes in recovery strengths at different recovery stages, but these occur with only very limited reductions in barriers to recovery, with even those in stable recovery typically having at least two barriers to their quality of life and wellbeing. Greater strengths in active addiction are associated with greater strengths and resources in recovery. As well as demonstrating population changes in each of the domains assessed, the current study has shown the potential of the Life In Recovery Scale as a measure of recovery capital that can be used to support recovery interventions and pathways.
    • Measuring carbon: An organisational management perspective.

      Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12)
    • Measuring the quality of life of family carers of people with dementia: development and validation of C-DEMQOL

      Brown, Anna; Page, Thomas E.; Daley, Stephanie; Farina, Nicolas; Basset, Thurstine; Livingston, Gill; Budgett, Jessica; Gallaher, Laura; Feeney, Yvonne; Murray, Joanna; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-04-27)
      We aimed to address gaps identified in the evidence base and instruments available to measure the quality of life (QOL) of family carers of people with dementia, and develop a new brief, reliable, condition-specific instrument. We generated measurable domains and indicators of carer QOL from systematic literature reviews and qualitative interviews with 32 family carers and 9 support staff, and two focus groups with 6 carers and 5 staff. Statements with five tailored response options, presenting variation on the QOL continuum, were piloted (n = 25), pre-tested (n = 122) and field-tested (n = 300) in individual interviews with family carers from North London and Sussex. The best 30 questions formed the C-DEMQOL questionnaire, which was evaluated for usability, face and construct validity, reliability and convergent/discriminant validity using a range of validation measures. C-DEMQOL was received positively by the carers. Factor analysis confirmed that C-DEMQOL sum scores are reliable in measuring overall QOL (ω = 0.97) and its five subdomains: ‘meeting personal needs’ (ω = 0.95); ‘carer wellbeing’ (ω = 0.91); ‘carer-patient relationship’ (ω = 0.82); ‘confidence in the future’ (ω = 0.90) and ‘feeling supported’ (ω = 0.85). The overall QOL and domain scores show the expected pattern of convergent and discriminant relationships with established measures of carer mental health, activities and dementia severity and symptoms. The robust psychometric properties support the use of C-DEMQOL in evaluation of overall and domain-specific carer QOL; replications in independent samples and studies of responsiveness would be of value.
    • The mediating effect of environmental and ethical behaviour on supply chain partnership decisions and management appreciation of supplier partnership risks

      Gallear, David; Ghobadian, Abby; He, Qile; Brunel University; University of Reading; University of Bedfordshire (Informa UK Limited, 2014-07-18)
      Green supply chain management and environmental and ethical behaviour (EEB), a major component of corporate responsibility (CR), are rapidly developing fields in research and practice. The influence and effect of EEB at the functional level, however, is under-researched. Similarly, the management of risk in the supply chain has become a practical concern for many firms. It is important that managers have a good understanding of the risks associated with supplier partnerships. This paper examines the effect of firms’ investment in EEB as part of corporate social responsibility in mediating the relationship between supply chain partnership (SCP) and management appreciation of the risk of partnering. We hypothesise that simply entering into a SCP does not facilitate an appreciation of the risk of partnering and may even hamper such awareness. However, such an appreciation of the risk is facilitated through CR’s environmental and stakeholder management ethos. The study contributes further by separating risk into distinct relational and performance components. The results of a firm-level survey confirm the mediation effect, highlighting the value to supply chain strategy and design of investing in EEB on three fronts: building internal awareness, monitoring and sharing best practice.
    • Membership of Chinese farmer specialized cooperatives and direct subsidies for farmer households: a multi-province data study

      Zhang, Jinhua; Wu, Junjie; Simpson, Jestine; Arthur, Clement Lamboi; Zhejiang University of Technology, China; Leeds Beckett University; University of Cape Coast (Taylor & Francis Group, 2019-07-29)
      The introduction of direct subsidies to farming households and the development of farmer cooperatives has provided two important approaches to China’s twenty-first century food policy challenges. However, research undertaken largely separates and focuses on subsidies or cooperatives. This neglects their interaction and complementarities. This article seeks to rectify this omission using a survey from 35 farmer specialized cooperatives (FSCs) and 561 farming households in 16 provinces, based on a two-stage treatment effect model. The findings suggest FSCs have become important organizations that improve farmers’ net income. Moreover, usage of agricultural machinery and direct subsidies also result in higher net income, though they have little impact on farmers’ machinery investment. The results provide an evidence source that contributes to debate concerning government subsidy policy. Policy may act more like an income transfer program, since it has little impact on farmers’ investment in agriculture. The study also highlights that there are complementary effects between FSCs and direct subsidies, and that China’s cooperative policy integrated with direct subsidies could be progressive.
    • Memories of working in Brixton

      Teague, Michael; Senior, Paul; Teesside University (Shaw and Sons, 2008)
    • Micro enterprises, self-efficacy and knowledge acquisition: evidence from Greece and Spain.

      Alonzo, Abel Duarte; Kok, Seng; Sakellarios, Nikolaos; O'Brien, Seamus; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Derby (Emerald, 2018-06-29)
      Purpose The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate the significance of self-efficacy and knowledge acquisition among micro businesses operating in challenging economic environments. The study uses social cognitive theory (SCT) and the knowledge-based theory of the firm (KBTF), and it proposes a refinement of these theoretical frameworks in the context of the study. Design/methodology/approach A case method was chosen, and face-to-face interviews with 14 owners of firms in island and rural regions of Greece and Spain were conducted. Findings Content analysis identified the importance of self-efficacy, primarily illustrated by entrepreneurs’ determination and self-motivation, propensity to take risks and ability to anticipate consequences of their actions. Acquisition and accumulation of explicit knowledge, particularly through generational or mentoring processes, and subsequent wealth of tacit knowledge, also emerged as very significant in preparing and guiding entrepreneurs. Various links between the adopted theories and findings emerged, particularly regarding forethought, vicarious learning (SCT) and specialisation in knowledge acquisition (KBTF). Originality/value The proposed theoretical refinement based on the SCT and KBTF paradigms allows for a more rigorous, in-depth reflection on the links between cognitive elements present in the participating micro entrepreneurs and knowledge-based attributes on their ability to increase organisational resilience. The study also contributes toward the micro business literature and addresses a knowledge gap, particularly, in that contemporary research has not explored entrepreneurial motivations among small firm entrepreneurs. Finally, the practical implications emerging from the findings provide a platform for various stakeholders (associations, government agencies) to appreciate and support entrepreneurs’ needs, notably, of acquiring, increasing and sharing knowledge.
    • Migrant workers’ rights, social justice and sustainability in Australian and New Zealand wineries: a comparative context

      Baird, Tim; Hall, C. Michael; Castka, Pavel; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ; Curtin University, Perth, Australia (Palgrave Macmillan/ Springer Nature, 2019-11-23)
      This chapter focuses on sustainable practices from the perspective of current social sustainability issues involving the rights of migrant workers within the New Zealand wine industry. A comparative context from the Australian wine industry is also provided using the cool climate winegrowing areas of Western Australia and Tasmania. Migrant workers’ rights and social justice were two areas which featured in the 2015 and 2016 National Wineries Survey that was conducted across all three of these regions and was designed to examine wine producers’ perceptions towards sustainability and wine tourism. This study found that in terms of the social aspects of sustainability and the treatment of migrant workers that very different opinions existed between Australian and New Zealand wineries. Wineries in both Tasmania and Western Australia saw social sustainability as impacting on their business practices, while their New Zealand counterparts were seemingly somewhat ambivalent towards this issue.
    • Mixing quantitative and qualitative research approach in social sciences - mixing methods or methodology?

      Sekol, Ivana; Maurović, Ivana; University of Osijek; University of Zagreb (2017-01-01)
      While in the western world the mixed-methods approach in social sciences is becoming more popular, in Croatian social sciences mixed methods research is still scarce. This is probably due to the complexity of mixed-methods research and numerous questions related to it. The most common questions that researchers need to answer prior to conducting a mixed methods study are: 1) will my research mix methods or methodologies?, 2) if it will mix methodologies, and not only methods, which paradigm(s) and research design will I use?, and 3) is it at all possible to combine inherently different paradigms? The main aim of this paper is to examine whether there is a strategy to simplify the way the existing literature describes numerous possibilities of combining qualitative and quantitative research - especially in terms of the type of mix-method research and whether each type mixes methods or methodologies. Following a literature review on the characteristics of mixed-- methods approach, types of mix-method design and paradigmatic challenges, this paper proposes a simplified model of the existing possibilities for combining qualitative and quantitative research. The model argues that, depending on their research questions, all mixed-methods attempts can be divided into one of the two main categories: one that mixes methods, and the other that mixes methodologies. The proposed model offers a straightforward tool for planning a mixed-methods research.
    • Mobile agency and relational webs in women’s narratives of international study

      Anderson, Vivienne; Cone, Tiffany; Rafferty, Rachel; Inoue, Naoko; University of Otago; Asian University for Women; University of Derby; Daito Bunka University (Springer, 2021-04-14)
      Internationalisation and forced migration are rarely thought about as related phenomena in higher education (HE) literature. Internationalisation is associated with movement, choice and brand recognition, and used in international rankings methodologies as a proxy for quality. Forced migration is associated with movement, but also with lack of choice, containment, or ‘stuckness’. Some scholars have called for a rethinking of ‘the international’ through attention to students as mobile agents, and international study situated within broader mobile lives. Our study responded to these calls through exploring the educational biographies of 37 international and refugee-background women students based in two universities: 21 in New Zealand, and 16 in Bangladesh. Ten of the women were from refugee or refugee-like backgrounds, while the remainder, were international students. The women’s accounts revealed the complex ways in which circumstances shaped their educational journeys similarly and differently. One woman represented mobility in relation to autonomy and choice; but most emphasised relational webs as shaping their access to and experiences of international study, and post-study aspirations. In this paper, we draw on selected narratives to illustrate the range of ways in which family and/or community members appeared in women’s accounts of their education journeys: as a source of (1) sustenance and support; (2) inspiration and motivation; and (3) obligation, and sometimes, regulation. We conclude by suggesting that attention to the affective and embodied entanglements that shape students’ international study journeys might inform new ways of thinking about both ‘the international’ and higher education more broadly.
    • Mobilising the dome

      Azara, Iride; Wakefield, Lisa; University of Derby (2016-09)
      More and more public and private tourism organisations are putting an emphasis on the creation of ‘memorable tourist experiences’ (Bærenholdt and Michael Haldrup, 2004; O’Dell, 2007 and Ennen and Van Maanen, 2013). It is now commonly accepted that technology plays a vital role in communication and interpretation and altogether in achieving this outcome, supporting tourism growth and instigating innovative responses to competition for tourist attraction (Neuhofer, Buhalis and Ladkin, 2012). This paper discusses how technology can be used to mobilise and reconceptualise a contested heritage space, focusing on an ongoing research project aimed at developing audio tours at the Devonshire Dome: a Grade II* listed building and iconic tourism landmark that dominates the Buxton 44 townscape (Sheller and Urry, 2006 and Haldrup and Larsen, 2006). Aimed at first-time visitor to Buxton, the exploration of the Dome encourages visitors to use the building under the terms and conditions of the Heritage Lottery Funds received in 2000. The terms of the HLF grant were that the building be made available to visitors and the community in perpetuity. The audio tours takes the visitors on a journey through time showcasing the building from a grand stable block; to a well-respected ‘hydropathic’ hospital before being given a new lease of life as a University campus. Preliminary findings, collected through a series of qualitative research interventions with visitors to the Dome and University stakeholders highlight the potential technology has to enable three competing heritage narratives of place to coexist simultaneously thus developing and reconfiguring people’s relationship with the place and the range of stakeholders involved in the delivery of the tourism product. The research contributes to the existing body of knowledge that aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of how technology can be used at heritage sites as both a key driver of change in helping to create and develop memorable experiences, redrafting visitor’s relationship with space and maximising effectiveness.
    • A model for predicting clinician satisfaction with clinical supervision

      Best, David; White, Edward; Cameron, Jacqui; Guthrie, Anna; Hunter, Barbara; Hall, Kate; Leicester, Steve; Lubman, Dan I.; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; University of New South Wales, Sidney, Australia; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2014-01-06)
      Clinical supervision can improve staff satisfaction and reduce stress and burnout within the workplace and can be a component of organizational readiness to implement evidence-based practice. This study explores clinical supervision processes in alcohol and drug counselors working in telephone and online services, assessing how their experiences of supervision link to workplace satisfaction and well-being. Standardized surveys (Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale and the TCU Survey of Organizational Functioning) were completed by 43 alcohol and drug telephone counselors. Consistency of supervisors and good communication were the strongest predictors of satisfaction with clinical supervision, and satisfaction with supervision was a good predictor of overall workplace satisfaction.
    • Modelling and simulations for tourism and hospitality. An introduction

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-05)
    • Money Laundering

      Hicks, David C; Graycar, Adam; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2019-06)
      International crime and justice is an emerging field that covers crime and justice from a global perspective. This book introduces the nature of international and transnational crimes, theoretical foundations to understanding the relationship between social change and the waxing and waning of the crime opportunity structure, globalization, migration, culture conflicts, and the emerging legal frameworks for their prevention and control. It presents the challenges involved in delivering justice and international cooperative efforts to deter, detect, and respond to international and transnational crimes; and the need for international research and data resources to go beyond anecdote and impressionistic accounts to testing and developing theories to build the discipline that bring tangible improvements to the peace, security and well-being of the globalizing world. A timely analysis of a complex subject of international crime and justice for students, scholars, policymakers and advocates who strive for the pursuit of justice for millions of victims.
    • Moral disengagement as a self-regulatory process in sexual harassment perpetration at work: a preliminary conceptualization

      Page, Thomas E.; Pina, Afroditi; University of Kent (Elsevier BV, 2015-01-13)
      Sexual harassment is recognized as a widespread form of aggressive behavior with severe consequences for victims and organizations. Yet, contemporary research and theory focusing on the motives and cognition of sexual harassment perpetrators continues to be sparse and underdeveloped. This review examines the motivations that underlie sexual harassment and the self-exonerating cognitions and behavioral techniques employed by perpetrators of sexual harassment. In this paper, we emphasize the need to understand the cognitive processes that disinhibit motivated individuals to sexually harass. Utilizing social cognitive theory as a foundation, we propose that cognitive mechanisms of moral disengagement are likely to have an important etiological role in the facilitation and reinforcement of sexually harassing behavior. A preliminary conceptual framework is presented, suggesting novel ways in which each of the various moral disengagement mechanisms may contribute to sexual harassment perpetration.
    • Moral Panics and Punctuated Equilibrium in Public Policy: An Analysis of the Criminal Justice Policy Agenda in Britain

      Jennings, Will; Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Hay, Colin; University of Sheffield (2017-12-22)
      How and when issues are elevated onto the political agenda is a perennial question in the study of public policy. This article considers how moral panics contribute to punctuated equilibrium in public policy by drawing together broader societal anxieties or fears and thereby precipitating or accelerating changes in the dominant set of issue frames. In so doing they create opportunities for policy entrepreneurs to disrupt the existing policy consensus. In a test of this theory, we assess the factors behind the rise of crime on the policy agenda in Britain between 1960 and 2010. We adopt an integrative mixed‐methods approach, drawing upon a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. This enables us to analyze the rise of crime as a policy problem, the breakdown of the political‐institutional consensus on crime, the moral panic that followed the murder of the toddler James Bulger in 1993, the emergence of new issue frames around crime and social/moral decay more broadly, and how—in combination—these contributed to an escalation of political rhetoric and action on crime, led by policy entrepreneurs in the Labour and Conservative parties.
    • Mr Cameron's new language initiative for Muslim women: lessons in policy implementation

      Turner, Royce; Wigfield, Andrea; University of Huddersfield (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016-05-19)
      As the government announces a programme to teach Muslim women to speak English, this article examines how such a policy can be implemented successfully, arguing that lessons can be drawn from both academic research, especially that carried out with Muslim women themselves, and previous successful policy application. It focuses on two projects carried out in the recent past for the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) and Jobcentre Plus, and outlines the key factors that led to their success. The LSC project involved one of the largest in‐depth surveys of Muslim women's attitudes towards work, and their views on life in Britain, that has ever been undertaken. The Jobcentre Plus project was a highly successful and innovative employment training initiative for ethnic minority women piloted in Sheffield, the very kind of ‘targeted’ approach that Mr Cameron has claimed his government's new language initiative will be.