• Investigative empathy: a strength scale of empathy based on European police perspectives

      Baker, Bianca; Bull, Ray; Walsh, Dave; University of Derby; De Montfort University (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-14)
      A growing body of research suggests that empathy may play a major role in establishing and maintaining rapport during police interviews. The benefits of rapport include not only increased cooperation from interviewees, but also gaining more accurate investigation-relevant information. However, despite a large amount of research on empathy which already exists, there still is, unfortunately, no universally agreed-upon definition and very little research on operationalizing and implementing appropriate forms of empathy, especially within the realm of investigative interviewing. Therefore, the present study was conducted with the goal of better understanding empathy from a police perspective and developing a way to assess and operationalize empathy for use in police interviews with suspects of high risk crimes (particularly with sex offences). The study considers police interviewers’ varying definitions of empathy in seven European countries, along with other factors. It analyzed police interviewers’ self-reports regarding their (i) training and methods employed during interviews, (ii) application of empathy in interviews, and (iii) definitions/understanding of empathy. Based on their answers, the various definitions of empathy were compiled and then placed on a new strength scale. It was found that officers in all participating countries varied within each country in their use of accusatory or information-gathering interview styles, suggesting that the methods employed were not systematically and uniformly taught and/or applied. The majority of participants in each country claimed to currently employ empathy in their interviews with suspects, yet they varied on their strength of the definitions provided. In no country was empathy considered useless in interviews and in no country was empathy defined as having aspects that may not be conducive to investigative interviewing.
    • Investigative empathy: Five types of cognitive empathy in a field study of investigative interviews with suspects of sexual offences

      Baker-Eck, Bianca; Bull, Ray; Walsh, Dave; University of Derby; De Montfort University (International Investigative Interviewing Research Group, 2021-04)
      Empathy in investigative interviews has increasingly become a focus in the recent literature on investigative interviewing as its implementation may aid in building and maintaining rapport. Displaying empathy in interviews is claimed to have positive impacts on the provision of investigation relevant information and the cooperation of interviewees. However, the literature currently omits practically operationalizing empathy, which would provide a means of implementing it effectively in investigative interviews. As such, the present study examines empathic displays by interviewers employed in interviews with suspects of high-risk crimes such as sexual offences in order to see what types are applied as a step towards identifying and possibly defining/operationalizing empathy during investigative interviews in the future. 19 audio-tapes of police interviews with suspects of sexual crimes in England and Wales conducted by experienced police interviewers were coded for their empathic displays and suspects’ level of cooperation throughout the interviews. Five different types of empathy were found to be employed. Interviews that had higher levels of suspect cooperation involved all five types of investigative empathy, whereas interviews in which fewer types of empathy were displayed had less cooperation (by offering less or no information). Thus, the use of investigative empathy in investigative interviews can indeed be recommended.
    • Investment motivations and UK business angels' appetite for risk taking: The moderating role of experience

      Croce, Annalisa; Ughetto, Elisa; Cowling, Marc; Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy; Collegio Carlo Alberto, Torino, Italy; University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-08-13)
      In this paper we use a large UK survey of business angels (BAs) investing in two different publicly supported schemes to directly question the role that investment motivations play in shaping investors’ appetite for risk. We dive deeper into the relationship between investment reasons and risk taking, by exploring the potential for a moderating effect derived from BAs’ past experience (i.e. financial and entrepreneurial experience). Our analysis reveals that both investment reasons (for return and for passion) have substantial explanatory power in shaping angels’ risk attitude, but their effect is moderated by the investors’ prior experience. This key finding represents important empirical support for what has so far been anecdotal evidence concerning BAs’ appetite for risk when investing.
    • Is it just a guessing game? The application of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) to predict burglary.

      Monchuk, Leanne; Pease, Ken; Armitage, Rachel; University of Huddersfield; University College London; Applied Criminology & Policing Centre, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK; UCL Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science, London, UK; Applied Criminology & Policing Centre, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-08-27)
      Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) aims to reduce crime through the design of the built environment. Designing out crime officers (DOCOs) are responsible for the delivery of CPTED by assessing planning applications, identifying criminogenic design features and offering remedial advice. Twenty-eight experienced DOCOs from across England and Wales assessed the site plan for one residential development (which had been built a decade earlier) and identified crime risk locations. Predictions of likely locations were compared with 4 years’ police recorded crime data. DOCOs are, to varying extents, able to identify locations which experienced higher levels of crime and disorder. However, they varied widely in the number of locations in which they anticipated burglary would occur.
    • Is the ‘shadow of sexual assault’ responsible for women’s higher fear of burglary?

      Hirtenlehner, Helmut; Farrall, Stephen; University of Sheffield (Oxford University Press, 2014-08-02)
      This article examines the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ which posits that women’s higher fear of crime, compared to males, can be attributed to their elevated fear of sexual victimization. We argue that the previous, overwhelmingly supportive, research on this issue is incomplete in three ways: (1) the thesis has not yet been extensively tested outside of North America, (2) competing, possibly overlaying, shadow effects of physical violence have widely been ignored and (3) perceptually contemporaneous offences have always been measured in an indirect manner. Drawing on the example of fear of burglary, this work tackles the afore-mentioned deficiencies. Results from a crime survey conducted in the United Kingdom indicate that, when relying on a rather traditional test strategy, the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ is supported. However, the findings are highly contingent on the employed methodology. When utilizing direct measures of perceptually contemporaneous offences, only physical, not sexual, assault turns out to cast a shadow over fear of burglary. The impact of fear of rape would appear to be reduced considerably once fear of broader physical harm is taken into account. We conclude that much of the existing evidence for the shadow thesis can be challenged on the grounds of failing to control for the effects of non-sexual physical assault and drawing on an inadequate operationalization of perceptually contemporaneous offences.
    • Is there a trade-off between accrual-based and real earnings management activities in the presence of (fe) male auditors?

      Owusu, Andrews; Mansour Zalata, Alaa; Omoteso, Kamil; Elamer, Ahmed A; University of Coventry; University of Southampton; University of Derby; Brunel University London (Springer, 2020-11-13)
      Prior research suggests that the presence of high quality auditors (i.e. proxied by audit firm characteristics) constrains accrual-based earnings management, but it inadvertently leads to higher real activities manipulation. We investigate whether such trade-off exists between accrual-based and real earnings management activities in the presence of female or male auditors. We use a sample of UK firms for the period 2009 to 2016 and find that firms audited by female auditors do not resort to a higher level real activities manipulation when their ability to engage in accruals management is constrained. Overall, our results suggest that the benefits of hiring female auditors (i.e. less accrual-based earnings management) are overwhelmingly higher than the costs they might bring to the client firms (i.e. higher real activities manipulation).
    • Is UK Financial Reporting Becoming Less Prudent?

      Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Kastel ltd – Kastel Publishing, 2014)
    • Islam in Turkey as shaped by the state, its founder and its history: Insight through Baptist eyes and three key Muslim figures.

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Baptist World Alliance, 2015)
      This book chapter originated in a presentation made to the Muslim-Christian Relations Commission at the 2014 Baptist World Alliance Gathering in Izmir, Turkey. Turkey is the modern day country which covers the geography of what was known as Asia Minor and which the early Christian Church had a strong presence, but where the contemporary Christian (and even more so the Baptist Christian) minority is very small. The chapter seeks to provide some insight into and explore key aspects of Turkish history and society by reference to the founder of the modern Turkish state, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881-1938) as well as to three significant Turkish Muslim figures who have contributed to the religious inheritance of Turkey and beyond – namely Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī; Said Nursi (1877-1960); and Muhammad Fethullah Gülen (1941-). The chapter highlights some aspects of Baptist Christian tradition that the chapter argues resonates with aspects of this Turkish inheritance in ways that might be of constructive help to contemporary (especially Baptist and Christian) understandings of Turkey, of Muslims of Turkish heritage, and of Muslims and Islam more generally. In doing so it explores some historical Baptist Christian perspectives on Turkish Muslims; discusses the question of whether “Anatolian Islam” has a distinctive "flavour"; traces the historical development from the multi-ethnic Ottoman Empire diversity to modern nationalism in Turkey; explores the cleavages and fractures of Left and Right, and issues of human rights in modern Turkish history, including the country's history of military coups. Finally it particularly discusses Fethullah Gulen's thought and actions in support of dialogue and against “Islamism” in a way that the chapter argues is resonance with a “Baptistic” vision of Christianity.
    • “It affects me as a man’: Recognising and responding to former refugee men’s experiences of Resettlement

      Rafferty, Rachel; Ali, Nijmeh; Galloway, Megan; Kleinshmidt, Heidi; Lwin, Khin Khin; Rezaun, Mercy; University of Otago (University of Otago, 2019)
      Former refugees bring many valuable skills and attributes to the communities in which they settle. Providing tailored support to refugees in the early stages of settlement increases the opportunities for them to contribute their skills and knowledge to our communities. This support needs to take into account the fact that former refugees can experience resettlement differently, according to their gender or age (Innocenti, n.d.). However, the particular experiences of men regarding forced migration and resettlement are not often researched (Affleck, Selvadurai, & Sikora, 2018). Dunedin is a small city in the South Island of New Zealand that became a designated resettlement location for former refugees from Syria and Palestine late in 2015. By 2018, staff in some organisations that provide services to assist former refugee families to settle in Dunedin (hereafter “service providers”) had noted that former refugee men tended to be less engaged in community life in the city, compared to their wives and children. This small-scale, exploratory study was conducted by a team of consultants from the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, at the University of Otago. The purpose was to understand how former refugee men have experienced settling into Dunedin, and to make suggestions for ways they could be supported to participate more fully in society. Three focus groups were conducted with 16 former refugee men, and in-depth interviews were also conducted with 14 individuals working across eight service provider organisations1. This report also refers to research studies relating to the resettlement of refugee men in other contexts, where this helps to contextualise our findings, and to make informed suggestions. However, it should be noted that our findings do not indicate how many of the other former refugee men in the city share the concerns raised in in the focus groups.
    • IT and Well-Being in Travel and Tourism

      Moisa, Delia; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Springer, 2022-10-27)
      Accelerating levels of stress and chronic disease have urged travellers to seek products and experiences that promote a holistic healthy living. However, in the context of increasingly integrated online and offline experiences, where technology does not always work in concert with human nature, tourists are facing the challenge of finding about how to best live a connected life. With travel being one of the most stress- inducing experiences we voluntarily subject ourselves to, tourism players are taking advantage of the latest technology to respond to the travellers’ changing needs and values, by designing innovative experiences that promote overall well-being. This chapter provides a review of the existing research on well-being related to the travel and tourism sector, while focusing on the link with technology advancements, especially the dual perspective of unplugging and intense technology use. As in all great technological revolutions, the digital traveller’s life may potentially unveil a dark side. However, the general consensus is that the positives of using technology within the travel and tourism sector will continue to outweigh the negatives. The chapter focuses on highlighting the different types of technology used to support the traveller’s state of well-being, as well as the role and impact of technology in relation to well-being while travelling.
    • “It was only harmless banter!” The development and preliminary validation of the moral disengagement in sexual harassment scale

      Page, Thomas E.; Pina, Afroditi; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; University of Kent (Wiley, 2015-11-29)
      Sexual harassment represents aggressive behavior that is often enacted instrumentally, in response to a threatened sense of masculinity and male identity. To date, however, theoretical attention to the social cognitive processes that regulate workplace harassment is scant. This article presents the development and preliminary validation of the Moral Disengagement in Sexual Harassment Scale (MDiSH); a self‐report measure of moral disengagement in the context of hostile work environment harassment. Three studies (total n = 797) document the excellent psychometric properties of this new scale. Male U.K. university students (Study 1: n = 322) and U.S. working males (Studies 2 and 3: n = 475) completed the MDiSH and an array of measures for construct validation. The MDiSH exhibited positive correlations with sexual harassment myth acceptance, male gender identification, and hostile sexism. In Study 3, participants were exposed to a fictitious case of hostile work environment harassment. The MDiSH attenuated moral judgment, negative emotions (guilt, shame, and anger), sympathy, and endorsement of prosocial behavioral intentions (support for restitution) associated with the harassment case. Conversely, the MDiSH increased positive affect (happiness) about the harassment and attribution of blame to the female complainant. Implications for practice and future research avenues are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:254–273, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    • Jail inmates’ perspectives on police interrogation.

      Cleary, Hayley M. D.; Bull, Ray; Virginia Commonwealth University; University of Derby; Department of Criminal Justice, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Department of Law, Criminology, and Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-26)
      Few studies have examined police interrogation strategies from suspects’ perspectives, yet assessing suspects’ views about interviewer approaches could provide important insights regarding confession decision making. The current study is the first American survey to assess a diverse sample of adult jail inmates’ views on police interrogation tactics and approaches. The study explored US jail inmates’ (N = 418) perspectives about how police should conduct interrogations. Potential dimensionality among 26 survey items pertaining to police tactics was examined using exploratory factor analysis. Group differences according to demographic and criminological variables were also explored. Four factors emerged, conceptualized as Dominance/Control, Humanity/Integrity, Sympathy/Perspective-Taking, and Rapport. Respondents most strongly endorsed Humanity/Integrity and Rapport strategies and were unsupportive of approaches involving Dominance/Control. Gender differences emerged for Dominance/Control and Humanity/Integrity, and Black respondents were more likely to value strategies related to Sympathy/Perspective-Taking. Suspects endorsed interrogation strategies characterized by respect, dignity, voice, and a commitment to the truth; they reported aversions to the false evidence ploy and approaches involving aggression. Overall, results from this incarcerated sample suggest that interviewees may be more responsive to rapport-building, non-adversarial strategies.
    • Japanese Martial Arts for Wellbeing During COVID-19

      Veasey, Christian; Foster Phillips, Charlotte-Fern; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis Group plc, 2021-09-16)
      The unprecedented and uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic have changed our lifestyles significantly, with lockdowns and social distancing measures in place to reduce virus transmission. These changes have likely had a negative effect on our wellbeing, and have been associated with increased stress, anxiety, and depression. During these unforeseen times, online martial arts lessons have highlighted the possibilities that martial arts offer in regard to positive wellbeing benefits such as self-awareness and self-mastery in managing and dealing with health issues. This short paper examines the potential benefits martial arts training may provide as an alternative wellbeing strategy to counter challenges associated with COVID-19.
    • The judiciary and constitutionalism in transitions : a critique.

      Yusuf, Hakeem O.; University of Glasgow (De Gruyter, 2007-12-28)
      The article critically analyses the role of the Nigerian courts in mediating resultant tensions in the post-authoritarian transition period. In doing this, I examine jurisprudence emanating from the courts on some serious inter-governmental disputes, as well as decisions bordering on individual and group rights, particularly those connected to the transition process. The dynamics of democratic transition in Nigeria after decades of military rule dictates the inevitability of these disputes. The military left a legacy of systemic distortion and institutional dysfunctions which constitute formidable challenges to the transitioning society. The article argues a case for a purposive jurisprudential approach to resolving the ensuing tensions which typically threaten the viability of the transition.
    • The judiciary and political change in Africa: Developing transitional jurisprudence in Nigeria.

      Yusuf, Hakeem O.; Queen's University Belfast (Oxford University Press, 2009-10-08)
      At a time of increased evaluations of law, human rights, and the rise of judicial power all over the globe, the work of most African judiciaries and the principles of the jurisprudence they espouse in promoting social justice remain an unlikely focus of comparative legal scholarship. This ought not to be so in view of the considerable activities of the courts on the continent in the dawn of the third wave of democratization. This article explores the work of the Nigerian Supreme Court in the political transition to democracy since 1999. Utilizing insights from the work of Ruti Teitel, it attempts to outline some of the major constitutional and extraconstitutional principles adopted by the Court in mediating intergovernmental contestations in the turbulent transition away from almost three decades of authoritarian military rule. It emerges that the task of fostering social transformation through the “weakest” branch seriously tasks the institutional integrity of the judiciary.
    • Justice capital: A model for reconciling structural and agentic determinants of desistance

      Best, David; Hamilton, Sharynne; Hall, Lauren; Bartels, Lorana; University of Derby; University of Western Australia; University of Lincoln; Australian National University (SAGE, 2021-04-08)
      The emerging literature on desistance (and recovery from addictions) has focused on key life-course transitions that can be characterised as the need for jobs (meaningful activities), friends (transitioning to pro-social) and houses (a home free from threat). The term ‘recovery capital’ is used to characterise personal, social and community resources an individual can draw upon to support their recovery, partly bridging agentic (per sonal) and structural (community) factors. The development of the concept of ‘justice capital’ furthers this reconciliation, by focusing on resources an individual can access and the resources that an institution can provide. We build on this by outlining the concept of institutional justice capital (IJC) to examine the role of criminal justice insti tutions in supporting or suppressing justice capital, particularly for marginalised groups. We use a case study approach, drawing on recent studies in prisons in Australia and the United Kingdom to develop a model of justice capital at an institutional level and discuss how this can shape reform of prisons and can be matched to the needs of offenders. The paper concludes with a discussion of future directions in implementing an IJC model, to deliver a strengths-based approach to promoting desistance and creating a metric for assessing the rehabilitative activities of institutions.
    • Justifying sexual harassment through moral disengagement: the role of in-group identification

      Page, Thomas E.; Pina, Afroditi; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; University of Kent (2014)