• Innovation in Small & Medium Enterprises in São Paulo

      Freitas, Adriano; Riascos, Luis; Andrade, Alexandre; Faco, Julio; Gallotta, Bruno; Universidade Federal do ABC; University of Derby (International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, 2021-04)
      The Brazilian Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent over 98% of all active companies in the country in 2020. The role of innovation in processes must receive special attention, which leads us to write this article to measure the Dimensions of Innovation in companies. The Radar of Innovation was applied to support the model of the diagnostic method tool, which was established to perform data analysis with the needs of each organization. Through this methodology, analyzing the 12 Dimensions of Innovation for a sample of 20 SMEs in the manufacturing segment, in the south region of São Paulo, is used for the research fieldwork. The role was to promote recommendations and collaboration, to improve the opportunities to be replicated in other organizations with similar challenges. The contribution of this work is the Dimension Processes, since most participants had common results. They all found the need to differentiate themselves from their competitors.
    • Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • Innovative assessment practice - evaluating and managing the impact on student experience

      Bevitt, Sheena; University of Derby, Derby Business School (Higher Education Academy (HEA), 2012-05)
      This paper summarises the input and discussions from a workshop which aimed to use the experiences gained from two patchwork text assessment projects undertaken at The University of Derby to explore wider issues relating to the use of innovative assessment. Evidence indicates both quantitative (grade uplift) and qualitative improvements in learning from these projects. Students reported a range of benefits including improved focus on learning outcomes, management of the learning process and feedback to help understanding and improvement of performance. Developments were also reported to a range of supporting study skills and confidence. However the impacts were not all positive with concerns raised about perceived additional workloads, the use of technology and over reliance on tutor feedback. The report suggests the introduction of innovative assessment practices needs to be carefully considered. Recommendations are discussed around design, at module and programme level, management of workload and student expectations, provision of guidance and feedback and the use of technology. The development of partnership working around new assessment methods and the need for institutional support is emphasised. Developments in innovative assessment need to be supported by further research in a number of key areas highlighted in the report and more effective evaluation mechanisms at group and individual level.
    • Institutional development and the Astana international financial center in Kazakhstan

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; Bekmurzayeva, Zhanyl; Janaidar, Dina; University of Leicester; University of Derby; Academy of Public Administration, Kazakhstan; KAZGUU University, Kazakhstan (Washington University, 2021-01)
      This article investigates the most recent instance of the transplantation of English corporate and financial law into a different legal environment. The Astana International Financial Center (AIFC) in Kazakhstan was launched in 2018. The AIFC has largely built on the institutional model pioneered by the Dubai International Financial Center. This key institutional innovation is the transplanting and operation of laws based on the English common law, independent of their national legal systems (civil law systems, heavily influenced by Islamic tradition, and, in the case of Kazakhstan, also Soviet socialist principles). This article seeks to contribute to the understanding of the system of Kazakhstan, a strategically located but well under-investigated country, and a potentially viable institutional model for other aspiring financial centers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this work is the first ever English academic literature on the development of the AIFC.
    • Institutional development and the Astana international financial center in Kazakhstan

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; Bekmurzayeva, Zhanyl; Janaidar, Dina; University of Essex (Washington University, 2020)
      This article investigates the most recent instance of the transplantation of English corporate and financial law into a different legal environment. The Astana International Financial Center (AIFC) in Kazakhstan was launched in 2018. The AIFC has largely built on the institutional model pioneered by the Dubai International Financial Center. This key institutional innovation is the transplanting and operation of laws based on the English common law, independent of their national legal systems (civil law systems, heavily influenced by Islamic tradition, and, in the case of Kazakhstan, also Soviet socialist principles). This article seeks to contribute to the understanding of the system of Kazakhstan, a strategically located but well under-investigated country, and a potentially viable institutional model for other aspiring financial centers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this work is the first ever English academic literature on the development of the AIFC.
    • Institutions and economic growth in Asia: The case of mainland China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Essex (Routledge, 2018-04-03)
      This book explores the role of institutions in economic growth, looking in particular at specific Asian countries and at particular cities within those countries. It considers a wide range of factors besides institutions, including the law, cultural factors and overall government arrangements. The differences between the countries studied are highlighted, and the impact of these differences assessed: the impact of English common law on arrangements in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia; sharia law in Malaysia; the differing lengths of time of colonial rule; the extent to which Chinese family businesses control an economy. Also studied are the degree to which the law is effectively applied, and a range of other social, economic and cultural factors. The book’s conclusions as to which factors have the greatest impact will be of considerable interest to economists of Asia and those interested in economic growth more widely.
    • Integrated reporting

      Conway, Elaine; Robertson, Fiona; Ugiagbe-Green, Iwi; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University; University of Leeds (Palgrave, 2021-07-30)
    • The integration of rail and air transport in Britain

      Stubbs, John; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Elsevier Ltd., 1998-03)
      This paper examines the state of intermodal rail-air transport in mainland Britain. Working on the basis that the relief of the ever increasing road congestion around airports necessitates a modal shift from road to rail transport for both intending air travellers and airport staff, the paper examines the different approaches taken, to date, in providing rail-air links. The paper draws heavily on the proceedings of the 1996 Opportunities for Air and Rail Interaction Conference. The main conclusion drawn in this paper is that the approach to rail-air integration has so far been very piecemeal and lacked the necessary national coordination required to capitalise upon the benefits of rail-air intermodal transport.
    • Inter-firm knowledge transfer between strategic alliance partners: A way forward

      He, Qile; Ghobadian, Abby; Gallear, David; University of Derby; University of Reading; Brunel University London (Wiley, 2021-01-11)
      Strategic alliance (SA) is pursued by a diverse array of firms motivated by a range of factors. Among the SA themes, knowledge transfer (KT) has gained significant popularity over the past fifteen years. The developing literature is ontologically, epistemologically, and methodologically diverse. In spite of helpful reviews, the intellectual structure (up-stream decisions) of SA–KT research remains unclear, arguably resulting in the accidental rather than deliberate diversity potentially slowing the advancement of knowledge, its efficacy, its interpretation, and utility. By systematically analysing the intellectual structure of the empirical SA–KT studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2017 we address these shortcomings. The aim is to identify the preponderance of particular methods, and/or analytical procedures, developing the essence of the established research conventions. By reviewing the up-stream rather than the more conventional down-stream decisions, we offer an alternative approach to conducting systematic management literature reviews helpful to future researchers.
    • The intercultural skills graduates and businesses in Europe need today

      Halila, Fawzi; Pillalamarri, Kalyani; Bell, Robin; Ali, Sa'ad; Moser, Karin; Brand, Milou; Clarke, Isabel; Godts, Inge; Mulier, Lieve; Prouska, Rea; et al. (European Commission, 2020)
      This project aims to develop the intercultural competencies of graduates and employees in Europe by enhancing the quality and relevance of their skills to enable them to be active professionals in the European working environment. The project investigates the perceived and actual intercultural competencies of graduates required by employers and then provides outputs that help address these needs. The project responds to the European Commission’s (EC) Strategic Framework – Education & Training 2020 view, that there has been a lack of focus on the involvement of social institutions on the cross-cultural skill-needs that companies have and on the effectiveness of investment in education and training in this area on business productivity. This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. Project Number 2019-1-UK01-KA203-061672. The project website in available below https://medialab.educationhost.co.uk/robbell/(link is external) The fist output is The Intercultural Skills Graduates and Businesses in Europe Need Today report and is availble at the website and the link below https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/9999/1/The%20Intercultural%20Skills%20Graduat...
    • The interfamilial principle and the harvest festival

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Koninklijke Brill NV, 2016-02-10)
      It is widely accepted that younger children can act as saviour siblings by donating cord blood or bone marrow to their gravely-ill brothers or sisters. However, it is under dispute whether these procedures are in the best interests of the child. This article suggests that parents may be relying on a thinly-veiled interfamilial approach, where the wider benefit to the whole family is used to justify the procedure to the Human Tissue Authority in the United Kingdom. This article suggests that the merging of familial interests to validate a non-therapeutic bone marrow harvest on a child forces altruism in a patient too young to understand, rendering the harvests unlawful under current law.
    • Internal financial management in smaller, entrepreneurial businesses

      Cowling, M; Matthews, C.; University of Brighton (Sage, 13/01/2018)
    • International commercial agreements - An Edinburgh Law Guide.

      Meiselles, Michala; Université Jean Moulin (Lyon 3) (Edinburgh University Press, 2013)
      A cross-disciplinary introduction to the complex world of international commercial agreements.
    • International environmental governance: A case for sub-regional judiciaries in Africa

      Ekhator, Eghosa Osa; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillam, 2020-08-21)
      Arguably, due to the non-justiciability of the right to environment doctrine in many African countries, Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs), activists, communities and individuals now utilise the sub-regional judiciaries in accessing justice in environmental issues. This chapter focuses on the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Community Court of Justice (ECCJ) and the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) because they are amongst the most active sub-regional judiciaries in Africa. The main question this chapter addresses is whether the rise of environmental governance or litigation in sub-regional judiciaries leads to better environmental protection for the victims and communities. The methodology adopted in this study is of a doctrinal nature that consists of library-based texts analysis. This paper undertakes a critical analysis of the emergent environmental governance under the sub-regional judiciaries in Africa.
    • International licensing agreements: IP, technology transfer and competition law.

      Meiselles, Michala; Wharton, Hugo; University of Derby (Wolters Kluwer, 2018-10-16)
      About this book: A guide to the complex world of international licensing agreements grouping together all the essential materials needed when considering cross-border licensing agreements. What’s in this book: As a step-by-step guide to drafting international licensing agreements, this book ensures that the needs of each contracting party are addressed. This expert guide covers the following: business models that may be used by the contracting parties; standard provisions encountered in an array of international licensing agreements; analysis of the key clauses in various international licensing agreements inter alia trademark, software, franchise and technology licences with provisions as affected by jurisdiction; effect of competition law in a variety of jurisdictions; ensuring trademark protection at both national and international levels; clear explanation of key franchising terminology and disclosure rules; and effect of international dispute resolution rules in a range of jurisdictions. Alongside contract analysis, this book details numerous case studies from an array of industries that ensure the accommodation of sector-specific issues. For practitioners operating within or representing medium to large firms who normally have to prepare or provide advice on international licence arrangements. The book’s thorough incorporation of detailed contract analysis will also be welcomed by professionals working for universities, industry, interest groups, government departments and international organisations.
    • International Review of Performance Management Systems in Public Employment Services

      Nunn, Alex; Bickerstaffe, Tim; Mitchell, Ben; Leeds Beckett University (Department for Work and Pensions, 2010)
      This report presents the findings from a literature review which explores how other Public Employment Services (PES) across Europe use performance measurement in support of their organisational objectives in order that Jobcentre Plus can learn from this when considering future improvements to its performance measurement regime. The main aim of this review was to understand existing labour market targets and whether these would be appropriate for Jobcentre Plus. This aim is underpinned by a number of objectives: - to determine what labour market targets other PES use to measure their performance of moving people into work; - to understand whether other PES use off flow measures; - to determine what evidence exists to demonstrate why these targets are used in other countries, i.e. how they help move people into work; - to investigate whether there are other organisations who have labour market targets and what these targets are; - to understand if there are differences between public, private and voluntary sector targets, where appropriate.
    • International standards on auditing in the international financial services centres

      Boolaky, Pran; Omoteso, Kamil; Coventry University (2016-06-06)
      Purpose- This paper aims to (1) investigate the position of International Financial Services Centres (IFSCs) in the International Federation of Accountants’ countries’ status on International Standards on Auditing’s adoption and (2) assess the factors influencing ISA adoption in these Centres. Design/methodology/approach- This research drew its data from various sources, including the World Economic Forum dataset, the World Bank Report on Observation of Standards and Codes, the World Development Indicators and the Economic Intelligence Unit Report on Democracy Index on fifty countries classified as IFSCs. The adoption status is then regressed on a number of variables of interest. To establish that our results are robust, we used a combination of different regression techniques comprising OLS, multinomial and logistic regressions. Findings- In addition to GDP growth and education level, this paper adds new evidence to the literature by reporting the positive association between the level of democracy and the enforcement of securities’ regulation on ISA adoption. It argues that political, economic, social and legal factors impact on ISA adoption in the IFSCs. Research limitations/implications- The sample size is limited to 50 from a population of 99 IFSCs because of lack of data. Some of the independent variables are basically archival data. Reliance is placed on WEF with regard to the measurement of protection of minority interest, securities and exchange regulations, and on Economic Intelligence Unit for democracy index. Practical implications- This paper stresses the importance of ISAs in IFSCs and the role of political power and the enforcement of securities laws on the adoption of ISA. Originality/value-This study fills the research gap relating to the absence of empirical studies on ISA adoption and its drivers in IFSCs.
    • International standards on auditing in the international financial services centres: What matters?

      Boolaky, Pran; Omoteso, Kamil; Griffith University; Coventry University (Emerald, 2016-06-06)
      Purpose This paper aims to investigate the position of international financial services centres (IFSCs) in the International Federation of Accountants’ countries’ status on the adoption of International Standards on Auditing (ISA) and assess the factors influencing ISA adoption in these centres. Design/methodology/approach This research drew its data from various sources, including the World Economic Forum (WEF) data set, the World Bank Report on Observation of Standards and Codes, the World Development Indicators and the Economic Intelligence Unit Report on Democracy Index on 50 countries classified as IFSCs. The adoption status is then regressed on a number of variables of interest. To establish that the results are robust, the authors used a combination of different regression techniques comprising OLS, multinomial and logistic regressions. Findings In addition to the gross domestic product growth and education level, this paper adds new evidence to the literature by reporting the positive association between the level of democracy and the enforcement of securities’ regulation on ISA adoption. It argues that political, economic, social and legal factors impact on ISA adoption in the IFSCs. Research limitations/implications The sample size is limited to 50 from a population of 99 IFSCs because of the lack of data. Some of the independent variables are basically archival data. Reliance is placed on WEF with regard to the measurement of protection of minority interest, securities and exchange regulations and on the Economic Intelligence Unit for democracy index. Practical implications This paper stresses the importance of ISAs in IFSCs and the role of political power and the enforcement of securities laws on the adoption of ISA. Originality/value This study fills the research gap relating to the absence of empirical studies on ISA adoption and its drivers in IFSCs.
    • International support for peace processes: New Zealand case study

      Rafferty, Rachel; University of Otago (Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2017-02-28)
      Launched by Ms Frances Adamson, Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade on 7 June 2017, State Support for Peace Processes: A Multi-Country Review was produced as part of the Australian International Conflict Resolution Project at the University of Melbourne and commissioned by the Development Policy Division of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The report explores how Canada, Malaysia, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America have approached supporting peace processes. It aims to identify concrete steps for Australia to consider in enhancing its approach to supporting peace and stability, including improving its capacity to support peace processes through whole of government approaches. The report was prepared by researchers at the University of Melbourne led by Prof John Langmore, Dr Tania Miletic, Dr Aran Martin and Mr Nathan Shea, and includes chapters from experts around the world who have advised on the work of their countries.