• Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • The importance of personal values and hospitableness in small foodservice businesses’ social responsibility

      Tomasella, Barbara; Ali, Alisha; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Intellect Ltd, 2019)
      This paper investigates the relationship between personal values, hospitableness and social responsibility in small, independent foodservice businesses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 owner-managers of these businesses located in Sheffield, United Kingdom (UK). The results established that hospitableness is expressed through the way in which these small businesses engage in social responsibility. In lifestyle and family businesses, personal values, such as altruism, friendliness and a passion for food, influence the hospitableness and social responsibility of the small foodservice business. In the long term, social responsibility actions expressing hospitableness add value to the business itself. This research contributes to the hospitality literature, by empirically demonstrating how hospitableness can be expressed through small business social responsibility, which can provide, in the long term, a competitive advantage for small, independent foodservice businesses.
    • Improving pofessional observers’ veracity judgements by tactical interviewing

      Sandham, Alex; Dando, Coral; Bull, Ray; Ormerod, Tom; University of Gloucestershire; University of Westminster; University of Derby; University of Sussex (Springer, 2020-06-25)
      Understanding whether a person of interest is being truthful during an investigative interview is a constant challenge and is of concern to numerous criminal justice professionals, most of whom are not involved in conducting the interview itself. Here we investigated police observers’ veracity detection performance having viewed interviews with truthtellers and deceivers using either the Tactical Use of Evidence (TUE), Strategic Use of Evidence (TUE) or a Control technique. Thirty serving police officers participated as post interview observers and each viewed 12 interviews in a counterbalanced order. Immediately post each interview each officer made a veracity judgment. Overall, untrained police observers were significantly more accurate (68%) when making veracity judgments post TUE interviews whereas for both SUE and Control performance was around chance (51% and 48%, respectively). Veracity performance for liars and truthtellers revealed a similar pattern of results (67% liars; 70% truthtellers) in the TUE condition. These results lend further support to the psychological literature highlighting the importance of how and when to reveal evidence or any other relevant event information during an investigative interview for ‘outing’ deceivers as well as allowing truthtellers early opportunities to evidence their innocence.
    • Improving the enhanced cognitive interview with a new interview strategy: category clustering recall.

      Paulo, Rui M.; Albuquerque, Pedro B.; Bull, Ray; University of Minho; School of Psychology; University of Minho; Braga Portugal; School of Psychology; University of Minho; Braga Portugal; School of Law and Criminology; University of Derby; Derby UK (Wiley, 2017-07-20)
      Increasing recall is crucial for investigative interviews. The enhanced cognitive interview (ECI) has been widely used for this purpose and found to be generally effective. We focused on further increasing recall with a new interview strategy, category clustering recall (CCR). Participants watched a mock robbery video and were interviewed 48 hours later with either the (i) ECI; (ii) revised enhanced cognitive interview 1 (RECI1) — with CCR instead of the change order mnemonic during the second recall; or (iii) revised enhanced cognitive interview 2 (RECI2) — also with CCR but conjunctly used with ‘eye closure’ and additional open‐ended follow up questions. Participants interviewed with CCR (RECI1 and RECI2) produced more information without compromising accuracy; thus, CCR was effective. Eye closure and additional open‐ended follow up questions did not further influence recall when using CCR. Major implications for real‐life investigations are discussed.
    • Improving traceability and transparency of table grapes cold chain logistics by integrating WSN and correlation analysis

      Xiao, Xinqing; He, Qile; Li, Zhigang; Antoce, Arina Oana; Zhang, Xiaoshuan; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; Beijing Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, Beijing, China; Coventry University; Shihezi University, Shihezi, China; University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania (Elsevier BV, 2017-11-20)
      Effective and efficient measurement and determination of critical quality parameter(s) is the key to improve the traceability and transparency of the table grapes quality as well as the sustainability performance of the table grapes cold chain logistics, and ensure the table grapes quality and safety. This paper is to determine the critical quality parameter(s) in the cold chain logistics through the real time monitoring of the temperature fluctuation implemented with the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), and the correlation analysis among the various quality parameters. The assessment was conducted through three experiments. Experiment I indicated that the temperature have a large fluctuation from 0 °C to 30 °C, and the critical temperatures could be determined as 0 °C, 5 °C, 10 °C, 15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C and 30 °C. Experiment II described that the firmness and moisture loss rate, whose Pearson correlation coefficient with the sensory evaluation were all greater than 0.9 at the critical temperatures determined in Experiment I, could be the critical quality parameters. Experiment III illustrated that the critical quality parameters, firmness and moisture loss rate, could be reliable indicators of table grapes quality by the Arrhenius kinetic equation, and results showed that the evaluation model based on the firmness is better to predict the shelf life than that based on the moisture loss rate. The best quality table grapes could be provided for the consumers via the easily and directly tracing and controlling the critical quality parameters in real time in actual cold chain logistics.
    • ‘In confidence: Thai economic virility, internal angst, and The Market: so, what’s next then?’

      Faulkner, Frank; University of Derby, Society, Religion and Belief Research Group (Shinawatra International University Press, 2011-06)
      This paper will examine the concept of confidence as it relates to economics, and will also apply it to the Thai paradigm. The reasoning for taking this approach is to understand and rationalize Thai economic dynamism in a period of relative global economic austerity, and also in the context of domestic unease. With these issues discussed and established, the paper will then offer some analysis of the likely imputations for future socio-economic development.
    • In response to the Prisons and Courts Reform Bill

      Teague, Michael; University of Derby (Pirnet, 2016-05)
      Comments in response to the Prisons and Courts Reform Bill, which formed part of the Queen's Speech.
    • The Indian film industry in a changing international market.

      Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Elliott, Caroline; University of Derby; Aston University (Springer, 2019-05-03)
      India has a longstanding reputation for its acclaimed film industry and continues to be by far the world’s largest producer of films. Nevertheless, domestic demand for films appears to be waning as in a number of developed countries with mature film industries. Hence, the econometric analysis in this paper is particularly timely as with demand for films in Indian cinemas falling it is important to identify those factors that make films appealing for Indian audiences. An original dataset is utilised that includes data on all Bollywood films released in India between 2011 and 2015. Account is taken of the potential endogeneity between variables through the use of the Generalised Method of Moments approach. Results are used to demonstrate how the Indian film market can continue to have a significant positive impact on the Indian economy. The discussion highlights appropriate film production company strategies and Government policy responses that should be considered to ensure the continued success of the Indian film industry both domestically and in an increasingly competitive international market.
    • Individual differences and rating errors in first impressions of psychopathy

      Gillen, Christopher T. A.; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Forth, Adelle E.; The University of Southern Mississippi; University of Derby; Carleton University (Sage, 2016)
      The current study is the first to investigate whether individual differences in personality are related to improved first impression accuracy when appraising psychopathy in female offenders from thin-slices of information. The study also investigated the types of errors laypeople make when forming these judgments. Sixty-seven undergraduates assessed 22 offenders on their level of psychopathy, violence, likability, and attractiveness. Psychopathy rating accuracy improved as rater extroversion-sociability and agreeableness increased and when neuroticism and lifestyle and antisocial characteristics decreased. These results suggest that traits associated with nonverbal rating accuracy or social functioning may be important in threat detection. Raters also made errors consistent with error management theory, suggesting that laypeople overappraise danger when rating psychopathy.
    • Industrialization of nature in the time of complexity unawareness, the case of Chitgar lake, Iran

      Akshik, Arash; Rezapour, Hamed; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Eastern Mediterranean University; Bahcesehir Cyprus University; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-10-16)
      To find answers to the challenges linked with ecological well-being, policymakers and authorities now prefer the ecosystem-based approach, as the solutions inspired by nature may deflect from ecological collapse. Hereupon, nature-based solutions (NBS) are rhapsodized both in practice and academia, as a means to achieve sustainable development. However, NBS, which inherently is supposed to bring forth positive outcomes, may also lead to unsustainable turmoil. On the other hand, the majority of the studies about NBS are from Western countries and studies focusing on the paradoxical functionality of NBS are scant, especially in the Middle East. In an attempt to bridge this gap, the current study uses one of the largest blue man-made infrastructures in the Middle East as a case. Following the phenomenological interpretive approach, the authors argue that NBS may fabricate unintended problems when the complexity of the supra systems are overlooked. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed.
    • The influence of criminal history on the likelihood of committing lethal versus nonlethal violence.

      Ganpat, Soenita Minakoemarie; Liem, Marieke; van der Leun, Joanne; Nieuwbeerta, Paul; Leiden University; Harvard University; Leiden University, Institute for Criminal Law and Criminology, Leiden, The Netherlands; Harvard Kennedy School; Harvard University; Cambridge, MA; Leiden University, Institute for Criminal Law and Criminology, Leiden, The Netherlands; Leiden University, Institute for Criminal Law and Criminology, Leiden, The Netherlands (Sage, 2012-11-08)
      This study focuses on the criminal history of serious violent offenders. Our aim is to determine: (a) to what extent the criminal history of lethally violent offenders differs from nonlethally violent offenders and (b) to what extent one’s criminal history influences the likelihood that violence ends lethally. We use criminal record data of offenders convicted of lethal violence (i.e., homicide offenders, N = 2,049) and offenders convicted of nonlethal violence (i.e., attempted homicide offenders, N = 3,387). The results suggest that nonlethally violent offenders have a more severe criminal history and that offender’s criminal history can be influential in predicting lethal versus nonlethal outcomes.
    • Informal networks in employee selection- A case of the Jordanian banking sector

      Ali, Sa'ad; Raiden, Ani; Kirk, Susan; University of Worcester; Nottingham Trent University (2017-06-23)
      Social networks and social capital have emerged as concepts of great interest and potential to help understand and explain how social structures impact political, social and business practices at the collective and individual levels. The basic premise is: investment in social relations will yield expected returns. Existing research has largely focused on the West; our knowledge of how social capital plays out in the Middle East is limited. This paper explores the prevalent practice of ‘wasta’ through the social capital lens, namely bonding and bridging social capital, and investigate HR managers’ perceptions of wasta in employment selection in Jordan. Often use of wasta in employment selection is related to favouritism and nepotism and the many negative outcomes of not adhering to merit-based selection. However, through in-depth interview data a more nuanced and multifaceted view of wasta in employment selection is revealed and how these impact HR practice in the organisation.
    • Information provision for challenging markets: the case of the accessibility requiring market in the context of tourism

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2013-07)
      The paper investigates the requirements of users with disabilities and the implications that these tourists have for developing accessible tourism information systems. A series of focus groups and interviews revealed the informational needs of people with disabilities, as well as the relevant technical difficulties involved in addressing these needs. The results indicated that the indispensable requirements include the following: (1) the veto or absolutely minimal prerequisites principle; (2) an indication of holistic accessibility paths; and (3) door-to-door access maps. The technical challenges identified focus on interoperability, content integration and personalization. The paper concludes by demonstrating how the tourism industry can overcome these challenges and address disabled travelers’ needs.
    • Innovation in Small & Medium Enterprises in São Paulo

      Freitas, Adriano; Riascos, Luis; Andrade, Alexandre; Faco, Julio; Gallotta, Bruno; Universidade Federal do ABC; University of Derby (International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, 2021-04)
      The Brazilian Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent over 98% of all active companies in the country in 2020. The role of innovation in processes must receive special attention, which leads us to write this article to measure the Dimensions of Innovation in companies. The Radar of Innovation was applied to support the model of the diagnostic method tool, which was established to perform data analysis with the needs of each organization. Through this methodology, analyzing the 12 Dimensions of Innovation for a sample of 20 SMEs in the manufacturing segment, in the south region of São Paulo, is used for the research fieldwork. The role was to promote recommendations and collaboration, to improve the opportunities to be replicated in other organizations with similar challenges. The contribution of this work is the Dimension Processes, since most participants had common results. They all found the need to differentiate themselves from their competitors.
    • Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • Innovative assessment practice - evaluating and managing the impact on student experience

      Bevitt, Sheena; University of Derby, Derby Business School (Higher Education Academy (HEA), 2012-05)
      This paper summarises the input and discussions from a workshop which aimed to use the experiences gained from two patchwork text assessment projects undertaken at The University of Derby to explore wider issues relating to the use of innovative assessment. Evidence indicates both quantitative (grade uplift) and qualitative improvements in learning from these projects. Students reported a range of benefits including improved focus on learning outcomes, management of the learning process and feedback to help understanding and improvement of performance. Developments were also reported to a range of supporting study skills and confidence. However the impacts were not all positive with concerns raised about perceived additional workloads, the use of technology and over reliance on tutor feedback. The report suggests the introduction of innovative assessment practices needs to be carefully considered. Recommendations are discussed around design, at module and programme level, management of workload and student expectations, provision of guidance and feedback and the use of technology. The development of partnership working around new assessment methods and the need for institutional support is emphasised. Developments in innovative assessment need to be supported by further research in a number of key areas highlighted in the report and more effective evaluation mechanisms at group and individual level.
    • Institutional development and the Astana international financial center in Kazakhstan

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; Bekmurzayeva, Zhanyl; Janaidar, Dina; University of Leicester; University of Derby; Academy of Public Administration, Kazakhstan; KAZGUU University, Kazakhstan (Washington University, 2021-01)
      This article investigates the most recent instance of the transplantation of English corporate and financial law into a different legal environment. The Astana International Financial Center (AIFC) in Kazakhstan was launched in 2018. The AIFC has largely built on the institutional model pioneered by the Dubai International Financial Center. This key institutional innovation is the transplanting and operation of laws based on the English common law, independent of their national legal systems (civil law systems, heavily influenced by Islamic tradition, and, in the case of Kazakhstan, also Soviet socialist principles). This article seeks to contribute to the understanding of the system of Kazakhstan, a strategically located but well under-investigated country, and a potentially viable institutional model for other aspiring financial centers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this work is the first ever English academic literature on the development of the AIFC.
    • Institutional development and the Astana international financial center in Kazakhstan

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; Bekmurzayeva, Zhanyl; Janaidar, Dina; University of Essex (Washington University, 2020)
      This article investigates the most recent instance of the transplantation of English corporate and financial law into a different legal environment. The Astana International Financial Center (AIFC) in Kazakhstan was launched in 2018. The AIFC has largely built on the institutional model pioneered by the Dubai International Financial Center. This key institutional innovation is the transplanting and operation of laws based on the English common law, independent of their national legal systems (civil law systems, heavily influenced by Islamic tradition, and, in the case of Kazakhstan, also Soviet socialist principles). This article seeks to contribute to the understanding of the system of Kazakhstan, a strategically located but well under-investigated country, and a potentially viable institutional model for other aspiring financial centers. To the best knowledge of the authors, this work is the first ever English academic literature on the development of the AIFC.