• AfCFTA and lex mercatoria: reconceptualising international trade law in Africa

      Onyejekwe, Chisa; Ekhator, Eghosa; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-09-08)
      This paper focuses on the Agreement for the Establishment of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). It argues that commercial activities in precolonial Africa was akin to the phenomenon of lex mercatoria in medieval Europe. It discusses two major tenets embedded in the AfCFTA: the variable geometry principle and the dispute settlement mechanism. It argues that for structural and comparative purposes, these principles (variable geometry and dispute settlement) form the kernel of modern lex mercatoria in the African context. This paper concludes by advocating that the AfCFTA will enhance the principles of lex mercatoria by promoting African trade principles.
    • AfCFTA: An emergent concept of 'Lex Mercatoria Africana'?

      Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Derby (AfronomicsLaw Blog, 2020-09-19)
    • Africa, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and digital diplomacy: (Re)negotiating the international knowledge structure

      Masters, Lesley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-08-20)
      The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) builds on the exponential growth of digital capacities, blurring the lines between the physical and digital spheres. Following its recognition as a phenomenon at the 2016 World Economic Forum, analysis has mainly focused on assessing the socio-economic challenges and benefits that advancements in science, technology and innovation hold. Yet there remains a shortfall in understanding the impact of these digital technologies from the perspective of international relations and diplomacy, particularly on questions of equality, governance, and emerging transnational relations. For Africa, participation in negotiating the international governance of digital technologies is critical in mitigating a peripheral role in the international knowledge structure, ensuring transformational rather than transactional relations when it comes to the 4IR. This article argues that analysis of digital diplomacy as diplomacy for digital technology – ie, negotiating the governance of digital technologies – provides a useful lens for critically assessing Africa vis-à-vis the 4IR .
    • Against all odds: Embedding new knowledge for event continuity and community well-being.

      Azara, Iride; Wiltshier, Peter; Greatorex, Jamie; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2018-02-01)
      Ashbourne Royal Shrovetide Football (ARSF) is a sporting event that occurs yearly on Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday in the market town of Ashbourne, in Derbyshire. Sometimes referred to as "mob football," Shrovetide can arguably be perceived as the quintessential sensorial and fully immersive event, being played out across town and involving the entire community. The event is also a unique tourism spectacle and a tool for tourism destination positioning. This article presents some of the results of a larger study that looks at challenges in the matter of events safety and the impacts that this has on event survival and the sustainable development of local communities. Findings highlight the need to support communities to learn from events in order to preserve them as they are essential for the maintenance of a unique and inimitable community identity.
    • Alternative research methods: introducing marketing sensing, a qualitative and interpretive perspective on research

      Longbottom, David; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-07)
      This chapter examines research from an interpretive perspective where qualitative methods are predominantly used. We present that qualitative methods may be used by researchers seeking to gain deeper insights and understanding of underlying issues particularly in the context of social science studies which often involve people and organisations in a social setting. We will argue that such methods can be used within an interpretive philosophy, or may be combined with quantitative methods in a pragmatic and mixed methods approach. Whilst the chapter considers traditional methods associated with qualitative research, such as depth interview and focus group, it also introduces several alternative methods and techniques which may be used by researchers seeking to gain creativity in their research design and presentation and provide deeper understanding to build their analysis and research conclusions. The chapter is arranged in two parts. In part one, we examine issues of context, philosophy, approach and strategy. In part two, we examine issues of strategy and methods, planning, data collection, and data presentation.
    • America: The great prison nation

      Teague, Michael; Teesside University (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2008)
      America leads the world in custody. The country’s 5,000 jails and prisons hold a staggering 2.24 million prisoners. Though home to just 1 in 20 of the global population, the USA incarcerates a quarter of the world’s prisoners. America’s proportional imprisonment rate of is 6–10 times greater than that of most developed, industrialised nations. In a typical year, some 13.5 million US citizens (out of a total population of 300 million) spend time in either jail or prison.This discussion outlines multiple areas of concern about the sheer scale and functioning of the US prison system, framed through the prism of UK comparisons.
    • An Evaluation of Management Perspectives of Sustainability Reporting In The Nigerian Oil Industry.

      Uzonwanne, G; Yekini, K; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; tobo, P; Coventry University (CCSE, 2014)
      This article investigates the perspectives of managers involved in sustainability reporting in the Nigerian oil industry. The article adopts a survey methodology in its approach to conduct this investigation. The survey employed a structured interview to investigate five themes built around the motivation for sustainability reporting within these organizations, hierarchical responsibility for sustainability reporting, the organizations objectives relative to the welfare of the people within the communities it operates in, policies in place to rejuvenate the damaged environment resulting from it’s operations and finally how sufficient in monetary terms is the company’s effort to wipe out its operational footprint. The data gathered was analysed qualitatively under these various themes. The general view emerging amongst the vast majority of the managers interviewed was that oil companies operating within the region have a key social responsibility and disclosure role to play but that it remains the role of the Nigerian Federal Government to provide the institutional framework around which the development of the region is to be hinged. Research Implications: More research is required in the area of CSR and CSD in developing/emerging markets to understand the link between weak institutional frameworks and voluntary CSR and CSD. This article contributes to CSR and CSD literature in broad terms and in specific terms to the literature on sustainable operations in developing/emerging markets. The originality is based on the fact that it explores manager’s perspectives in a developing/emerging market.
    • Analysing the risks of adopting circular economy initiatives in manufacturing supply chains

      Ethirajan, Manavalan; Arasu M, Thanigai; Kandasamy, Jayakrishna; K.E.K, Vimal; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Kumar, Anil; VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; National Institute of Technology, Patna, Bihar, India; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University (Wiley, 2020-08-25)
      The concept of circular economy (CE) has proven its worth due to the scarcity of natural resources and huge amounts of wastage which impacts the environment. Thus, the adoption of the CE concept in the supply chain becomes critical. However, due to the complex nature of processes/activities in the circular supply chain (CSC), managing risk has become a priority to avoid disruption. In current literature, no discussion has been conducted on how to analyse the risks in the context of CSC. Therefore, to fill this literature gap, this study concentrates on identifying and analysing the risks to promote effective circular initiatives in supply chains in the context of the manufacturing industry, thus minimising the negative environmental impact. A total of 31 risks were identified through an extensive literature review and discussions with experts. A grey‐based decision‐making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method is applied by incorporating the experts' knowledge to compute prominence and cause/effect scores to develop an interrelationship map. Finally, a vulnerability matrix for risk categories is developed using the average of prominence and cause/effect scores of risks. The results show that transparent process is the most prominent risk and branding is the least significant risk. By using the average prominence and cause/effect score, a risk category, namely, financial risk, is identified as most vulnerable to CSC. These findings will help industry managers not only to prepare business strategies in the adoption of CE initiatives in supply chains by eliminating risks but also in minimising negative environmental impact.
    • An analysis of the impact of unconventional oil and gas activities on public health: New evidence across Oklahoma counties

      Apergis, Nicholas; Mustafa, Ghulam; Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; University of Texas at El Paso, USA; University of Derby; Queen Mary University of London, UK (Elsevier, 2021-03-17)
      The expansion of unconventional oil and gas development (UNGD) in the US has been highly controversial so far with no consensus on its health, economic, environmental, and social implications. This paper examines the effects of UNGD on the health profile of the population in the context of Oklahoma using a unique data set. To this end, the analysis assembles a panel data set including 76 counties of Oklahoma, spanning the period 1998-2017. The analysis estimates the long-run relationship between the health profile and its determinants using the Common Correlated Effects (CCE) method. The empirical setup allows for cross-sectional dependence and accounts for both observed and unobserved heterogeneity. The main findings provide strong evidence that UNGD activities have negative effects on human health-related outcomes across all counties in Oklahoma. Specifically, an increase in the number of (unconventional) wells has a positive impact on mortality rates, and incidences of cancer, cardiac, and respiratory diseases in communities in close spatial proximity, and a negative impact on life expectancy. These findings provide evidence that UNGD activities pose significant risks to the public health profile across the Oklahoma population. Such findings are expected to have substantial implications for the national debate on the regulation of UNGD.
    • Antecedents and outcomes of resident empowerment through tourism

      Aleshinloye, Kayode; Woosnam, Kyle; Tasci, Asli; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Central Florida; University of Georiga, Athens, Greece; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-02-17)
      Even though empowerment is a frequently mentioned keyword in resident attitude studies, the relationship network of this concept is rather vague. It is critical to understand the factors that influence empowerment, and factors that empowerment influences in return. Therefore, the current study modeled residents’ data from the top tourism destination in the U.S.—Orlando, Florida. Data from 415 residents were analyzed using Partial Least Squares - Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) on SmartPLS to test the effects of residents’ involvement and economic benefits from tourism on their psychological, social and political empowerment, and thus quality of life and ultimately, place attachment. Findings revealed that psychological empowerment is the most significant dimension of resident empowerment influencing both place dependence and place identity, suggesting that residents hold special values for their place. Managerial and theoretical implications, along with limitations (in light of the project occurring pre-COVID-19) and future research opportunities are discussed. Keywords: Resident attitudes, empowerment, place attachment, quality of life, PLS
    • Anthropology of gastronomies

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (2013-03-27)
      “Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are” Savarin (1825) These defining words spoken in a time of dynamic changes within gastronomy arguably shaped the ideological consumption of food. This book chapter aims to discuss how the anthropology of gastronomies as a concept has always been of significance. It is only recently that the subject has risen from the fringe of academic inquiry to a more prominent position within the discipline, moving away from the simple listing of the constitutive aspects of the diet. (Herrmann and Gruneberg, 1993; Shimp, 1994; Sternberg and Grigorenko, 1997; Straughan and Roberts, 1999; Wagner, 2003; Wells, 1993). Furthermore, the chapter will show how food anthropology is embedded within cultures and has differing ideologies and meanings. Levi-Strauss, (1966) suggested that cognitive ability and consumption is based upon the tribal knowledge and examination on cultural habits such as behaviour and the way people think, classification patterns and their knowledge is a reflection of their collective experiences. The chapter aims to discuss the current and potential further implications of anthropology of gastronomies using 3 key themes/questions: • Can gastronomies be simply classified under an anthropological umbrella? • Is there a picture of our concern or apathy when it involves food? • If they can be proved can we truly determine anthropologies of gastronomies on a planet which now expresses personal representation and national identity with the food policy and the food it consumes? Food anthropology is not strictly limited to investigating one particular food ritual and its interaction with culture. Many studies have focused on fast foods and fast food restaurants and issues of globalization, trans-nationalism and offering of a contrived product described as authentic. Representations of gastronomies are also identified in the hermeneutics of its text (Tressider, 2011), (interpreted in several ways based on an individual’s ethnocentrism and experiences)
    • Anti social behaviour, community and radical moral communitarianism

      Hopkins-Burke, Roger; Hodgson, Philip; Nottingham Trent University (2015-04-13)
      This article offers an insight into the lives of individuals who are repeat victims of antisocial behaviour (ASB). Drawing on data derived from 15 case studies, the authors demonstrate the plight that such victims endure on a daily basis. The research reveals that a number of victims feel abandoned by their communities and the authorities and, how for many, there is an overwhelming sense of being “trapped” within their own homes. The article also offers evidence to support previous claims that police crime data only captures a small proportion of the actual number of incidents of ASB that occur. We conclude by proposing an emphasis on individual and community responsibility and suggest that by adopting a radical moral communitarian approach ASB could be reduced as part of rebuilding communities.
    • The application of big data and AI in the upstream supply chain

      Hanson-New, Colin; Daniel, Jay; University of Derby (Logistics Research Network, 2019-09)
      The use of Big Data has grown in popularity in organisations to exploit the purpose of their primary data to enhance their competitiveness. In conjunction with the increased use of Big Data, there has also been a growth in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyse the vast amounts of data generated and provide a mechanism for locating and constructing useable patterns that organisations can incorporate in their supply chain strategy programme. As these organisations embrace the use of technology and embed this in their supply chain strategy, there are questions as to how this may affect their upstream supply chains especially with regards to how SME’s may be able to cope with the potential changes. There exists the opportunity to conduct further research into this area, mainly focusing on three key industry sectors of aerospace, rail and automotive supply chains.
    • Application of machine learning to predict visitors’ green behaviours in marine protected areas: evidence from Cyprus

      Rezapouraghdam, Hamed; Akshiq, Arash; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Cyprus University, Lefkosa, Turkey; Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow, Poland; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Taylor & Francis, 2021-03-10)
      Interpretive marine turtle tours in Cyprus yields an alluring ground to unfold the complex nature of pro-environmental behavior among travelers in nature-based destinations. Framing on Collins (2004) interaction ritual concept and the complexity theory, the current study proposes a configurational model and probes the interactional effect of visitors’ memorable experiences with environmental passion and their demographics to identify the causal recipes leading to travelers’ sustainable behaviors. Data was collected from tourists in the marine protected areas located in Cyprus. Such destinations are highly valuable not only for their function as an economic source for locals but also as a significant habitat for biodiversity preservation. Using fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA), this empirical study revealed that three recipes predict the high score level of visitors’ environmentally friendly behavior. Additionally, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) method was applied to train and test the patterns of visitors’ pro-environmental behavior in a machine learning environment to come up with a model which can best predict the outcome variable. The unprecedented implications on the use of technology to simulate and encourage pro-environmental behaviors in sensitive protected areas are discussed accordingly.
    • Applying CS and WSN methods for improving efficiency of frozen and chilled aquatic products monitoring system in cold chain logistics

      Xiao, Xinqing; He, Qile; Fu, Zetian; Xu, Mark; Zhang, Xiaoshuan; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; Coventry University; University of Portsmouth (Elsevier BV, 2015-09-14)
      Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is applied widely in food cold chain logistics. However, traditional monitoring systems require significant real-time sensor data transmission which will result in heavy data traffic and communication systems overloading, and thus reduce the data collection and transmission efficiency. This research aims to develop a temperature Monitoring System for Frozen and Chilled Aquatic Products (MS-FCAP) based on WSN integrated with Compressed Sending (CS) to improve the efficiency of MS-FCAP. Through understanding the temperature and related information requirements of frozen and chilled aquatic products cold chain logistics, this paper illustrates the design of the CS model which consists of sparse sampling and data reconstruction, and shelf-life prediction. The system was implemented and evaluated in cold chain logistics between Hainan and Beijing in China. The evaluation result suggests that MS-FCAP has a high accuracy in reconstructing temperature data under variable temperature condition as well as under constant temperature condition. The result shows that MS-FCAP is capable of recovering the sampled sensor data accurately and efficiently, reflecting the real-time temperature change in the refrigerated truck during cold chain logistics, and providing effective decision support traceability for quality and safety assurance of frozen and chilled aquatic products.
    • Applying hierarchy of expert performance (HEP) to investigative interview evaluation: strengths, challenges and future directions

      Huang, Ching-Yu; Bull, Ray; Dror, Itiel; Bournemouth University; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-06-16)
      The purpose of this paper is to systematically examine the research literature on the decision of expert interviewers within the theoretical framework of the Hierarchy of Expert Performance (HEP, Dror, 2016). After providing an overview of the HEP framework, existing research in the investigative interviewing at each of the eight levels of the HEP framework is reviewed. The results identify areas of strength in reliability between experts’ observations (Level 2) and of weakness in reliability between experts’ conclusions (Level 6). Biases in investigative interview experts’ decision making is also revealed at biasability between expert conclusions (Level 8). Moreover, no published data is available in reliability within experts at the level of observations (Level 1) or conclusions (Level 5), biasability within or between expert observations (Level 3 and 4) and biasability within expert conclusions (Level 7). The findings highlight areas where future research and practical endeavor are much needed investigative interview.
    • Are members of mutual aid groups better equipped for addiction recovery? European cross-sectional study into recovery capital, social networks, and commitment to sobriety

      Martinelli, Thomas F.; van de Mheen, Dike; Best, David; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Nagelhout, Gera E.; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-11-09)
      An increasing body of evidence shows that informal mutual aid groups benefit those in addiction recovery. However, attention for mutual aid groups in practice and policy varies internationally and is only recently emerging in continental Europe. Existing evidence is mostly limited to studies of Alcoholics Anonymous groups in the United States. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the relationship between membership of a variety of mutual aid groups and recovery capital, participation in social networks, and commitment to sobriety for individuals in drug addiction recovery (N ¼ 367), living in the UK, the Netherlands, and Belgium. A convenience sample of participants completed an extensive assessment about their recovery experiences. Sixty-nine percent of participants reported lifetime (ever) membership of different mutual aid groups. Analyses reveal that membership of mutual aid groups is strongly associated with more participation and (self-reported) changes in social networks, greater levels of recovery capital, and a stronger commitment to sobriety. The findings suggest that participation in mutual aid groups may support addiction recovery through multiple mechanisms of change in favor of recovery. These findings highlight how mutual aid support may complement formal addiction treatment.
    • Are the dominant teaching theories in higher education adequate to underpin teaching practices in enterprise and entrepreneurship context?

      Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-11-08)
      It can be comprehended that the models and theories which are currently used to reinforce teaching depict the education practices of transmitting knowledge from teacher to students, which is more traditional, linear, input-output construction of teaching that has dominated adult education for decades including the last half century. As numerous studies (e.g. QAA, 2018) emphasizes that both the needs of learner and learning in enterprise and entrepreneurship education (EEE) context is different from other disciplines and mainstream higher education (HE). This requires further development of teaching methods and practices that can encourage the aspirations of the learner in this particular education setting. When investigating the theories and approaches that are used to examine teaching in HE, the relevance and adequacy of them to review teaching practices in this 21st century and EEE context is a question. Thus, the need of new theoretical models and frameworks can be clearly observed. For example, to investigate teacher’s role in EEE setting, there is a need of adopting more context specific, individual-focused research methods. When the recent outcomes associated with the UK higher education are taken into account, there is an emerging key debate; i.e. are universities actually turning off potential entrepreneurs. Whether these outcomes are due to teaching, learning environment or other activities within universities, is still largely a question, hence requires further research to find answers.
    • Are victims of crime mostly angry or mostly afraid?

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Springer/ Palgrave, 2019-05)
      Analysis of the Crime Survey for England and Wales identifies anger and annoyance rather than fear as the most common emotional responses to victimisation by crime, despite fear’s pre-eminence in the criminological literature. While the trend since 2003 shows an increase in fear relative to anger, anger remains more common for all crime categories and all levels of victim-rated offence seriousness. The writers contend that the mismatch between the preponderance of anger in victim accounts and the preponderance of fear in the academic literature is convenient for government and police. Subtly setting fear as the default ‘appropriate’ emotion to be evoked by victimisation makes for a populace less inclined to ‘take matters into its own hands’. Plans to develop research on victim anger are outlined.
    • Area and individual differences in personal crime victimisation incidence: The role of individual, lifestyle/routine activities and contextual predictors

      Pease, Ken; Andromachi, Tseloni; University of Derby (Sage, 2014-09-02)
      This article examines how personal crime differences between areas and between individuals are predicted by area and population heterogeneity and their synergies. It draws on lifestyle/routine activities and social disorganization theories to model the number of personal victimization incidents over individuals including routine activities and area characteristics, respectively, as well as their (cross-cluster) interactions. The methodology employs multilevel or hierarchical negative binomial regression with extra binomial variation using data from the British Crime Survey and the UK Census. Personal crime rates differ substantially across areas, reflecting to a large degree the clustering of individuals with measured vulnerability factors in the same areas. Most factors suggested by theory and previous research are conducive to frequent personal victimization except the following new results. Pensioners living alone in densely populated areas face disproportionally high numbers of personal crimes. Frequent club and pub visits are associated with more personal crimes only for males and adults living with young children, respectively. Ethnic minority individuals experience fewer personal crimes than whites. The findings suggest integrating social disorganization and lifestyle theories and prioritizing resources to the most vulnerable, rather than all,residents of poor and densely populated areas to prevent personal crimes.