• Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • Green Jobs and Green Skills in the East Midlands

      Paterson, Fred; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-10-15)
      This Race to Zero White Paper explores the different definitions of ‘green jobs’ and ‘green skills’ and sets out what we know about the current state of ‘green collar’ jobs in the East Midlands and how the University of Derby is supporting the shift towards a sustainable economy.
    • Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain

      Burton-Cartledge, Phil; University of Derby (Verso, 2021-09)
      Despite winning the December 2019 General Election, the Conservative parliamentary party is a moribund organisation. It no longer speaks for, nor to, the British people. Its leadership has sacrificed the long-standing commitment to the Union to “Get Brexit Done.” And beyond this, it is an intellectual vacuum, propped up by half-baked doctrine and magical thinking. Falling Down offers an explanation for how the Tory party came to position itself on the edge of the precipice and offers a series of answers to a question seldom addressed: as the party is poised to press the self-destruct button, what kind of role and future can it have? This tipping point has been a long time coming and Burton-Cartledge offers critical analysis to this narrative. Since the era of Thatcherism, the Tories have struggled to find a popular vision for the United Kingdom. At the same time, their members have become increasingly old. Their values have not been adopted by the younger voters. The coalition between the countryside and the City interests is under pressure, and the latter is split by Brexit. The Tories are locked into a declinist spiral, and with their voters not replacing themselves the party is more dependent on a split opposition—putting into question their continued viability as the favoured vehicle of British capital.
    • Social Bonding and Public Trust/Distrust in COVID-19 Vaccines

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, College of Business, Law, & Social Sciences, Derby Business School; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (MDPI AG, 2021-09-14)
      COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has been a growing concern. The pandemic has proved to be very complicated with the mutated virus. The Delta variant is contributing to a surge of cases across the globe. Vaccine hesitancy can be socially contagious, requiring more stringent efforts from policy makers and health professionals in promoting vaccine uptake. Some evidence shows that vaccine acceptance appears to have played an integral role in successfully controlling the pandemic. Vaccination acceptance, however, demands that the public has a good understanding of the vaccine’s benefits in promoting healthier societies and people’s quality of life. Unclear COVID-19 vaccine information can lead to distrust in vaccines and vaccine hesitancy. It is of paramount importance to communicate clear and unbiased vaccine information to the public to encourage vaccine uptake. Word of mouth communication remains important to further promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake in the community. This short paper discusses the role of social bonds and public trust/distrust and word of mouth communication in vaccine decision making.
    • IT and Well-Being in Travel and Tourism

      Moisa, Delia; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Springer, 2022-10-27)
      Accelerating levels of stress and chronic disease have urged travellers to seek products and experiences that promote a holistic healthy living. However, in the context of increasingly integrated online and offline experiences, where technology does not always work in concert with human nature, tourists are facing the challenge of finding about how to best live a connected life. With travel being one of the most stress- inducing experiences we voluntarily subject ourselves to, tourism players are taking advantage of the latest technology to respond to the travellers’ changing needs and values, by designing innovative experiences that promote overall well-being. This chapter provides a review of the existing research on well-being related to the travel and tourism sector, while focusing on the link with technology advancements, especially the dual perspective of unplugging and intense technology use. As in all great technological revolutions, the digital traveller’s life may potentially unveil a dark side. However, the general consensus is that the positives of using technology within the travel and tourism sector will continue to outweigh the negatives. The chapter focuses on highlighting the different types of technology used to support the traveller’s state of well-being, as well as the role and impact of technology in relation to well-being while travelling.
    • Place Affect Interventions during and post the COVID-19 Pandemic

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; College of Business, Law & Social Sciences, Derby Business School, University of Derby, UK; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (Frontiers, 2021-09-14)
      The COVID-19 health and economic crisis has also brought a rise in people being unable to cope with their existing medical conditions and other issues such as domestic violence, drugs, and alcohol among others. Suicidal tendencies have been on the rise. Feelings of isolation causing emotional distress in place-confined settings have put additional pressure on the healthcare systems demanding that we find additional and complementary means of support for those in need. This is important not only in the current pandemic but also in the post-pandemic world. The goal is to collectively contribute and address the recurring calls for actions to maintain global well-being and public health. An important discussion to bring on the table is the need to promote interventions for people to cope with the pandemic and to adjust to the post-pandemic world. Promoting affective attitudes toward place can foster well-being outcomes. This has important benefits and is of relevance to governments, policymakers, and healthcare professionals in delivering better healthcare equipping people with coping mechanisms both throughout the pandemic and in the long run. However, the key challenge is how to foster these place affect attitudes meeting the changing demands in the post-pandemic world. It is in the middle of a crisis that the conversation needs to start about how to strategically plan for the recovery.
    • Japanese Martial Arts for Wellbeing During COVID-19

      Veasey, Christian; Foster Phillips, Charlotte-Fern; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis Group plc, 2021-09-16)
      The unprecedented and uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic have changed our lifestyles significantly, with lockdowns and social distancing measures in place to reduce virus transmission. These changes have likely had a negative effect on our wellbeing, and have been associated with increased stress, anxiety, and depression. During these unforeseen times, online martial arts lessons have highlighted the possibilities that martial arts offer in regard to positive wellbeing benefits such as self-awareness and self-mastery in managing and dealing with health issues. This short paper examines the potential benefits martial arts training may provide as an alternative wellbeing strategy to counter challenges associated with COVID-19.
    • Food for thought – empowering consumers: a critique of EU food labelling law

      Meiselles, Michala; University of Derby (Irish Society of European Law, 2021)
      Intended to support a sensible and independent decision-making process by consumers whilst preventing the spread of misinformation, food information is an essential means of communication with consumers. This paper asks how the effectiveness of the current system of food information in the European Union (EU) can be improved from the point of view of the consumer? To answer this question, the author looks at the deficiencies of the existing regulatory framework to show that whilst the current structure provides consumers with comprehensive and reliable information, the mechanics of the system are inadequate. In light of these gaps, the paper advocates the position that the EU should consider introducing a mandatory FOPNL (front-of-package nutrition label) supported by an information campaign, aimed at enhancing the ability of consumers to use food information to make rational and healthy food choices. To this end, this paper looks at the existing regulatory framework (part 1) before exploring the literature on mandatory disclosure regulation and highlighting the problems associated with food information from the consumer’s perspective (part 2). In the final segment, this paper looks at FOPNLs and the way in which the latter can be combined with an information campaign to enhance consumer food labelling literacy.
    • The social marketing paradox: challenges and opportunities for the discipline

      Akbar, Bilal; Foote, Liz; Lawson, Alison; French, Jeff; Deshpande, Sameer; Lee, Nancy, R.; Nottingham Trent University; Antioch University New England, NH, Keene, USA; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing Ltd, London; et al. (Springer, 2021-08-22)
      This paper contributes to emerging discourse about the ongoing challenges and opportunities of social marketing as a discipline. The paper presents a qualitative perspective on existing challenges faced by social marketing and offers suggestions for addressing these challenges. Nine semi-structured interviews with social marketing academics and practitioners from six different countries were conducted. Thematic analysis was used to analyse and interpret the qualitative data. The study provides insight into existing challenges for social marketing, classified into three key themes according to their position within or outside of the discipline: 1) poor branding of the discipline as an internal challenge, 2) competing disciplines as an external challenge, and 3) overall reach of the discipline, seen as both an internal and external challenge. The findings suggest that social marketing needs to overcome poor branding issues to sufficiently address external challenges. We conclude by arguing for a more robust marketing of the discipline. While scholars have identified the challenges and opportunities for social marketing as a discipline, they have paid little attention to examining these challenges from the viewpoint of expert practitioners and academics. This paper presents a nuanced contextual understanding of the identified challenges through a qualitative perspective and explores how social marketing can overcome these challenges.
    • Was Quashing the Maji-Maji Uprising Genocide? An Evaluation of Germany’s Conduct through the Lens of International Criminal Law

      Bachmann, Klaus; Kemp, Gerhard; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-07-30)
      Recently, political actors in Tanzania have demanded compensation from Germany for colonial atrocities against various ethnic and religious groups during the Maji-Maji uprising (1905–1907). By analyzing first-hand archival records from Germany and Tanzania, this article examines whether German actions constitute genocide according to the Genocide Convention or the International Criminal Tribunals’ jurisprudence. The authors find strong evidence to support a claim of genocide, and assess the viability of potential compensation claims against Germany; they conclude, however, that such claims would meet significant obstacles due to the concept of state immunity for sovereign actions under international customary law, as well as case law of the International Court of Justice.
    • An empathetic approach: Using appreciative inquiry to gain balanced insights

      Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; Hancock, Charles; University of Derby (Academy of Marketing, 2021-07-07)
      Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is described as a collaborative approach to the exploration and development of investigations with informed consideration of what is working well, as opposed to a problem-solving approach (Reed, 2010). The traditional problem-solving approach starts from the point of view that ‘xyz is not working in the abc department’ and has a potential disadvantage in that it focuses on the participants, so participants may feel as if they are under scrutiny and that the researcher is seeking someone to blame for the issue or problem (Goldberg and Commins, 2001). Moreover, this approach focuses on problems that may lead to negatively perceived outcomes, whereas concentrating on positivity, strengths, successes, achievements, positive choices, positive resources, energy and assets can lead to enhanced outcomes and the sustainability of existing strengths (Carter, 2006).
    • From KAM to KARMA: The evolution of Key Account Management for co-creation of value

      Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2020-09-03)
      This study investigates Key Account Management (KAM) from a Marketing and Business-to-Business (B2B) perspective. A review of literature finds that in recent years marketing scholars have proposed that KAM has developed from its traditional roots in sales management to having a greater focus on relational aspects to co-creation of value. However, whilst the principles of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) to co-creation of value are well grounded within the marketing literature there are no theoretical models proposed for the practical application within KAM. To develop a new theoretical model for KAM by analysing the development of KAM over the past 30 years from a process driven discipline to today’s more complex arena that draws on CRM, SDL and co-creation of value. Secondary analysis of literature, analysis of KAM as a discipline, followed by analysis of definitions of KAM from the past 30 years. The emphasis of KAM has evolved into a Key Account Relationship Management Approach (KARMA), and a new theoretical model has been developed. New theoretical model proposed based on the KARMA approach.
    • Africa, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and digital diplomacy: (Re)negotiating the international knowledge structure

      Masters, Lesley; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-08-20)
      The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) builds on the exponential growth of digital capacities, blurring the lines between the physical and digital spheres. Following its recognition as a phenomenon at the 2016 World Economic Forum, analysis has mainly focused on assessing the socio-economic challenges and benefits that advancements in science, technology and innovation hold. Yet there remains a shortfall in understanding the impact of these digital technologies from the perspective of international relations and diplomacy, particularly on questions of equality, governance, and emerging transnational relations. For Africa, participation in negotiating the international governance of digital technologies is critical in mitigating a peripheral role in the international knowledge structure, ensuring transformational rather than transactional relations when it comes to the 4IR. This article argues that analysis of digital diplomacy as diplomacy for digital technology – ie, negotiating the governance of digital technologies – provides a useful lens for critically assessing Africa vis-à-vis the 4IR .
    • Narratives Of Navigation: Refugee-Background Women’s Higher Education Journeys In Bangladesh And New Zealand

      Anderson, Vivienne; Cone, Tiffany; Inoue, Naoko; Rafferty, Rachel; University of Otago; Asian University for Women; Daito Bunka University; University of Derby (Sites: New Series, Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa New Zealand, 2020-12-30)
      Navigating higher education (HE) is a complex exercise for many students, including those from refugee backgrounds. Internationally, only a very small percentage of refugee-background students access HE. In a 2018 study, we explored 37 women students’ narrative accounts of international study in Bangladesh and New Zealand. Our participants included 10 women from refugee backgrounds. Theoretically, our research was a response to calls from critical scholars to consider the different circumstances that shape students’ international study, and the ethical and pedagogical implications of these for ‘host’ institutions. In this article, we explore the refugee-background women’s accounts of accessing, navigating, and thinking beyond HE, and their thoughts on factors that support refugee-background students’ success in HE. We argue for the need to: reject ‘grand narratives’ in relation to refugee-background students; acknowledge students’ ‘necessary skillfulness’ while supporting their capacity to navigate HE; and recognise refugee-background students’ commitments and influence beyond HE institutions.
    • Defining the Platform of Positive Peace

      Standish, Katerina; Devere, Heather; Suazo, Adan; Rafferty, Rachel; University of Otago; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021-07-23)
      After a brief introduction of typical notions of peace, this chapter ventures to trace the idea of positive peace in recent scholarship to establish how the term is utilized in the PACS world. It then endeavors to introduce each editorial domain within this handbook including a synopsis of each form of intervention theoretically followed immediately by a summary of the chapters that inhabit the PALGRAVE Handbook of Positive Peace.
    • Mobile agency and relational webs in women’s narratives of international study

      Anderson, Vivienne; Cone, Tiffany; Rafferty, Rachel; Inoue, Naoko; University of Otago; Asian University for Women; University of Derby; Daito Bunka University (Springer, 2021-04-14)
      Internationalisation and forced migration are rarely thought about as related phenomena in higher education (HE) literature. Internationalisation is associated with movement, choice and brand recognition, and used in international rankings methodologies as a proxy for quality. Forced migration is associated with movement, but also with lack of choice, containment, or ‘stuckness’. Some scholars have called for a rethinking of ‘the international’ through attention to students as mobile agents, and international study situated within broader mobile lives. Our study responded to these calls through exploring the educational biographies of 37 international and refugee-background women students based in two universities: 21 in New Zealand, and 16 in Bangladesh. Ten of the women were from refugee or refugee-like backgrounds, while the remainder, were international students. The women’s accounts revealed the complex ways in which circumstances shaped their educational journeys similarly and differently. One woman represented mobility in relation to autonomy and choice; but most emphasised relational webs as shaping their access to and experiences of international study, and post-study aspirations. In this paper, we draw on selected narratives to illustrate the range of ways in which family and/or community members appeared in women’s accounts of their education journeys: as a source of (1) sustenance and support; (2) inspiration and motivation; and (3) obligation, and sometimes, regulation. We conclude by suggesting that attention to the affective and embodied entanglements that shape students’ international study journeys might inform new ways of thinking about both ‘the international’ and higher education more broadly.
    • Beyond Expansion or Restriction? Models of Interaction between the Living Instrument and Margin of Appreciation Doctrines and the Scope of the ECHR

      Ita, Rachael; Hicks, David; De Montfort University; University of Derby (Brill, 2021-06-23)
      The living instrument doctrine of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) is criticized as restricting the margin of appreciation of States and expanding the scope of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Systematic examination of this claim is usually overlooked in the context of the relationship between the admissibility and merits phase of ECtHR cases. This paper considers this claim in the context of jurisdictional arguments on incompatibility ratione materiae (subject matter outside the scope of the Convention) and the link to the merits of the case. Case law of the ECtHR from January 1979 to December 2016 is assessed to elaborate four models of interaction between the margin of appreciation and living instrument doctrines. This paper argues the need to go beyond consideration of expansion and restriction of the scope of the ECHR, and to assess the Court’s appetite for allocating new duties to States based upon the case arguments and positioning of living instrument and margin of appreciation doctrines.
    • Do we really offer refuge? Using Galtung's concept of structural violence to interrogate refugee resettlement support in Aotearoa New Zealand

      Rafferty, Rachel; Burgin, Anna; Anderson, Vivienne; University of Derby; University of Otago (Sites: New Series, Association of Social Anthropologists of Aotearoa New Zealand, 2020-12-12)
      Decades after the first refugee convention was signed, the global community is still failing to meet its commitment to protect refugees from harm. In this article, we draw on Galtung’s concept of structural violence to highlight how harm can be caused not only by physical violence but also by social structures in resettlement contexts, including economic systems, legal frameworks and government institutions. We examine how recognising the exposure of resettled refugees to structural violence in their host countries can help us interrogate the quality of the ‘refuge’ offered and point to significant gaps in national resettlement systems. We consider Aotearoa New Zealand as a case where there is an extensive refugee resettlement support system, but argue that it fails to adequately acknowledge and address the exposure of refugees to forms of structural violence caused by factors such as institutionalised monoculturalism and economic inequality. We conclude by calling for an expanded understanding of ‘refuge’ that would reorient resettlement systems towards identifying and addressing structural violence while supporting refugees to overcome the harmful impacts of both physical and structural violence in their lives.
    • Regional Economic Communities as the Building Blocs of the African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement

      Ajibo, Collins .C; Nwankwo, Chidebe .M; Ekhator, Eghosa; University of Nigeria; University of Derby (MARVIS BV, 2021-06-16)
      The African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement (AfCFTA) recognises the Regional Economic Communities (RECs) as the building blocs for continent-wide integration in line with the historical efforts reflected in the Lagos Action Plan of 1980 and the transitional plan of the African Union (AU) articulated in the 1991 Abuja Treaty establishing the African Economic Community (Abuja Treaty). The AfCFTA enjoins State Parties that are members of other RECs, which have attained among themselves higher levels of elimination of customs duties and trade barriers than those provided for under the Protocol, to continue maintaining this, and where possible improve upon, existing higher levels of trade liberalisation among themselves. While RECs are fundamental to the African integration experience and are considered the building blocs of AfCFTA, several challenges may emerge. This paper examines the prospects and challenges of RECs under the recently established AfCFTA regime.
    • Managing strategic accounts with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value

      Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2021-07-16)
      This study explores managing strategic accounts for co-creation of value, and the utility of management input to account plans and empowering account managers. In recent years, managing strategic accounts (SA) has progressed towards relationship-building with customer relationship management (CRM) and use of service-dominant logic (SDL) for co-creation of value. However, there is limited data regarding managing SA with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value. Accordingly, this research aims to appraise the functions of managing SA with empowerment and management support for co-creation of value. Aligning with a pragmatic research philosophy, semi-structured interviews (n=12) were selected with mixed demographics. Participants were primarily strategic account managers (SAMs) from a variety of business sectors. Thematic analysis was conducted on the interview transcripts to arrive at key issues and themes. The findings imply that the emphasis of managing SA has progressed into a value-creating account relations management approach. Empowerment and support from senior management were felt to be important to SAMs. This study shows the importance of management support and empowerment for successful strategic account management that creates value for both customer and supplier.