• Tackling religion or belief-related harassment and hate incidents: a guide for higher education providers

      Aune, Kristin; Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya; Osmond, Jane; Peacock, Lucy; Weller, Paul; Coventry University; University of Derby; University of Oxford (Coventry University, 2020)
      Higher education is not just a context for formal, curricula-based learning. Students also learn from their wider university experiences, as they meet and interact with people from different backgrounds, beliefs and values. The university and college experience helps students become people who respect the social diversity around them and thrive in religiously diverse and multicultural environments. Higher education providers have a duty to provide safe and secure environments for formal and informal learning. An important aspect of this is to act proactively in order, as far as possible, to prevent harassment and hate incidents and to provide mechanisms for dealing with them if they occur. This guidance document focuses specifically on religion or belief-related harassment and hatred and is informed by the ‘Tackling religion-based hate crime on the multi-faith campus’ project, carried out at Coventry University as one of 11 projects funded by the Office for Students (OfS) within its Catalyst initiative to tackle religion-based hate crime and support student safety and wellbeing. This guidance was developed in consultation with the other 10 projects, Advance HE (the Higher Education sector charitable body) and the Church of England’s Education Office (with expertise and responsibility for a large number of university chaplains). The guidance helps to unpack the sometimes complex terminologies, categories and legal distinctions relevant to work in this area. It offers advice on how higher education providers can set up and promote an effective reporting system for incidents of religion or belief-harassment and hate. This can then inform institutional action and/or referral to external agencies such as the police. It offers an example that higher education providers can interpret and apply in ways that suit their contexts.
    • Taking crime seriously: Playing the weighting game

      Ignatans, Dainis; Pease, Ken; University of Derby (Oxford Academic, 2015-09-18)
      The advantages and problems of weighting crime counts by harm inflicted are detailed. To obtain a better understanding of crime trends and distributions, victim judgements of the seriousness of offences committed against them derived from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) were analysed and used as weights of crime counts. The data were used to check whether there was a seriousness drop paralleling the crime drop of recent decades. There was, albeit somewhat less precipitous. Series crimes (i.e. repeated crimes against the same targets and presumed to be by the same perpetrators) account for an astonishing 39% of all crime and around 42% of crime weighted by seriousness. The article focuses on distributions across households. In line with our earlier work on crime events per se, the most victimized households have benefited most from the seriousness ‘drop’ in absolute terms, but still account for a similar proportion of total harm over time. A case is made for the use of CSEW victim seriousness judgement for a variety of analytic and practical purposes.
    • Technology challenges in accounting and finance.

      Crookes, Elizabeth; Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Springer, 2018-06-01)
    • Technology challenges in accounting and finance.

      Crookes, Elizabeth; Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-06-01)
      Since human history began, new ways of working or inventions have emerged which have fundamentally changed the accepted methods of living and/or doing business. Whether this was the wheel or the printing press, the ‘technology of the day’ has disrupted accepted practice, and usually required learning new skills or approaches. In the modern era, much of this disruption has occurred through information technology, such as the internet. This chapter presents four technologies of varying degrees of maturity which are likely to change the accounting profession: Big Data, Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain. We explain what each technology is and how it might impact the business world and how accountants need to potentially change their skillsets to address the challenges these disruptive technologies bring.
    • Technology Platforms and Challenges

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (Channel View Publications, 2010-12)
    • The “tech” of two cities: what Hong Kong failed but Shenzhen succeeded

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Essex (Coller Capital, 2017-05-01)
      Shenzhen used to be a tiny town of around 30,000 people, north of the then prosperous British colony, Hong Kong, in southern China. The story is certainly entirely different now that Shenzhen is comparable to, if it has not already outshone its once proud neighbor. Shenzhen’s Nanshan district, home to a huge hi-tech industrial park, is now China’s richest, with a higher per capita GDP than even capitalist Hong Kong. This article will compare the two cities through the use of CIV city cases. It will discuss whether the institutional differences can help to explain the respective growth stories of the cities. Afterwards, the article will consider the prospects of the Qianhai Shenzhen-Hong Kong Modern Service Industry Cooperation Zone, a national-level initiative to combine the core strengths of the two cities in an attempt to boost the existing technology center to a new level before a conclusion is drawn.
    • Terrorism's footprint of fear

      Roach, Jason; Pease, Ken; Charlotte, Sanson; University of Derby; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-08-24)
      Generally, when terms have extensive connotative baggage, it is wise to denude them. In the context of this paper, the only attribute we feel might be retained from the terrorism label is its implication that in such attacks, classes of people are deemed more or less equally ‘legitimate’ targets such that each citizen regards herself as a legitimate target. In the terrorist’s ideal scenario, insofar as it is thought through, the evocation of public fear of victimisation advances their cause. It leads to pressure on governments to settle or serves to destabilise the target administration by making daily life more problematic and by devoting resources to combatting terrorism’s threat that cannot be sustained indefinitely. The evolutionary context to this book leads us to consider anti-predator behaviour by prey animals alongside public fear of victimisation generated by acts of terrorism.
    • Testing the Governance-Productivity Nexus for Emerging Asian Countries

      Mustafa, Ghulam; Jamil, Muhammad; Forman Christian College (A Chartered University); Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Lahore School of Economics, 2018-06-10)
      This paper presents panel data estimates of the relationship between governance, aggregate labor productivity (ALP) growth and total factor productivity (TFP) growth for 12 Asian economies between 1996 and 2013. Our results show that government effectiveness has a positive and significant effect on ALP in both levels and first differences. Regulatory quality has a positive impact on ALP only in first difference. Although both government effectiveness and regulatory quality have a positive effect on TFP growth in first difference, only political stability is significant and positive in the levels specification. Other findings indicate that physical capital and human capital have a positive effect on ALP growth. We also find evidence of positive spillover effects with respect to human capital. The positive association between governance, economic growth and productivity provide a better understanding of the role of governance in enhancing economic performance. Our findings have policy implications for ways to achieve good governance to enhance economic growth and productivity
    • Text, cases and materials on medical law

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Pearson, 2015)
      Text, Cases and Materials on Medical Law combines detailed commentary and analysis of the law with excerpts from a range of sources, both legal and non-legal, to help set the law in context and deepen your knowledge of this contentious and highly emotive area of law.
    • Thanatourism: Case studies in travel to the dark side

      Mandelartz, Pascal; Johnston, Tony; University of Derby (Goodfellows, 2015-10)
      Thanatourism, or dark tourism, is an increasingly pervasive feature of the contemporary tourism landscape. Travel to have actual or symbolic ‘encounters with death’ is not a new phenomenon and is now one of the fastest growing areas for debate and research in the study of Tourism. Thanatourism is an important new overview of the growing field. It introduces more rigorous scholarship, new philosophical perspectives and a wealth of empirical material on the contemporary and historical consumption of death with case studies designed to stretch and challenge current discourse. Contexts presented in the book will include- well known religious sites battlefield locations genocide camps lesser known exhibition centres and a plague site. It takes a broad methodological approach and discusses both research and teaching approaches in thanatourism as well as acknowledging its emotive nature. It is an essential new resource for all those who research or teach in the area as well as for upper level students.
    • Thatcherite ideology, housing tenure and crime: the socio-spatial consequences of the right to buy for domestic property crime.

      Farrall, Stephen; Hay, Colin; Jennings, Will; Gray, Emily; University of Sheffield (2015-09-14)
    • Thatcher’s Children, Blair’s Babies, Political Socialization and Trickle-down Value Change: an age, period and cohort analysis

      Grasso, Maria Teresa; Farrall, Stephen; Gray, Emily; Hay, Colin; Jennings, Will; University of Sheffield (2017-01-26)
      To what extent are new generations ‘Thatcherite’? Using British Social Attitudes data for 1985–2012 and applying age-period-cohort analysis and generalized additive models, this article investigates whether Thatcher’s Children hold more right-authoritarian political values compared to other political generations. The study further examines the extent to which the generation that came of age under New Labour – Blair’s Babies – shares these values. The findings for generation effects indicate that the later political generation is even more right-authoritarian, including with respect to attitudes to redistribution, welfare and crime. This view is supported by evidence of cohort effects. These results show that the legacy of Thatcherism for left-right and libertarian-authoritarian values is its long-term shaping of public opinion through political socialization.
    • The determinants of CEO turnover: evidence from French listed companies

      Boussaada, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Makhlouf, M; Coventry University (CAIRN.INFO, 2018)
      We investigate the effect of corporate performance, ownership structure and other governance mechanisms on CEO turnover. Based on data from 153 French listed firms between 2003 and 2012, we use logit estimation technique. Consistent with previous studies, we show that the fall of financial performance increases drastically the CEO turnover probability. In addition, we find differentiated direct and moderating effects, depending on the type of broad shareholder involvement. However, the CEO does not influence the likelihood of CEO turnover
    • The impact of mergers and acquisitions on shareholders’ wealth: evidence from Nigeria

      Abeleje, R; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Scottish Group, 2014)
      This research paper seeks to validate the controversial post-merger synergy in Nigerian context. According to theory, mergers and acquisition should enhance synergistic effect to the advantage of the shareholders. This paper evaluates whether post-acquisition value attributable to shareholders of Nigerian banks surpasses that of the pre-acquisition period. The paper uses a fifteen year secondary data of five judgementally selected banks to analyse and compare pre-acquisition and post-acquisition shareholders‟ value in a balanced manner. The measurement index of shareholders' wealth is a modified version of the ROE (Return on Equity). SPSS version 20 and Excel spread sheet was also used to get the R, R2 ,T-test and F-test. It was discovered that shareholders' fund strongly influenced the profitability of the Nigerian banks but value to shareholders in the post-acquisition period is lower compared to the pre-acquisition period. Managers of Nigerian banks should not rest on the oars of government initiatives. They should be proactive in their operation as far as profitability is concerned. This research is the first of its kind to make a balanced and up to date comparison of pre-and post M&A period (ie 7yrs pre-merger & 7yrs post-merger). The index of measurement is modified ROE that incorporates only what relate directly to shareholders alone.
    • The Information Governance Review and the new legal framework for informatics

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2013-07-30)
    • The innovation debt penalty: Cost of debt, loan default, and the effects of a public loan guarantee on high-tech firms

      Cowling, M; Ughetto, E; Lee, N.; University of Brighton (Elsevier, 28/06/2017)
      High-technology firms per se are perceived to be more risky than other, more conventional, firms. It follows that financial institutions will take this into account when designing loan contracts, and that this will manifest itself in more costly debt. In this paper we empirically test whether the provision of a government loan guarantee fundamentally changes the way lenders price debt to high-tech firms. Further, we also examine whether there are differential loan price effects of a public guarantee depending on the nature of the firms themselves and the nature of the economic and innovation environment that surrounds them. Using a large UK dataset of 29,266 guarantee backed loans we find that there is a high-tech risk premium which is justified by higher default, but, in general, that this premium is altered significantly when a public guarantee is provided for all firms. Further, all these loan price effects differ on precise spatial economic and innovation attributes.
    • The legalities and politics of health informatics

      Grace, Jamie; University of Derby (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2011-03)
    • The relationship between environmental worldviews, emotions and personal efficacy in climate change

      Ramkissoon, H; Smith, L. D. G.; Monash University (IJAS, 2014)
      This study investigates the effects of a video on the Australian viewers’ environmental worldviews, their emotions and personal efficacy in climate change. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were employed to test the associations between the constructs. The main theoretical contribution relates to the mediating role of emotions in climate change communication. Results further show that the video increased viewers’ perception that they can influence climate change outcomes, as well as encourage others to reduce the effects of climate change. Findings suggest that effective climate change communication has to target people’s emotions. Policy should be directed to climate change communication tools with a focus on emotional engagement to encourage people to take personal responsibility in climate change and act, catalysing the desired behavioural change.
    • The role of loan commitment terms in credit allocation on the UK small firms loan guarantee scheme

      Cowling, M; Matthews, C; Liu, W.; University of Brighton (Senate Hall Academic Publishing, 31/03/2017)
      In this paper we provide empirical evidence concerning the nature of loan commitment contracts as reflected by individual loan contract parameters in influencing the size of bank commitments. Specifically, we consider how the quantitative allocation of credit, the loan amount, is affected or altered by changes to other components of the total loan package. By doing so we shed some more light on the types of real world trade-offs that credit constrained firms might face when approaching banks for funds, using the UK governments loan guarantee programme. Our results point at the importance of relationship lending in the UK.
    • The satisfaction-place attachment relationship: Potential mediators and moderators.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T; Monash University (Elsevier, 23/05/2015)
      Researchers use place satisfaction as a dependent variable extensively since place has implications for a range of performance measures. This study reverses the relationships suggesting place satisfaction as a useful antecedent to place attachment. Place satisfaction, measured as visitors' summative evaluation of their experience is likely to be more positively associated with place dependence, identity, affect, and social bonding. The findings of this study support this contention and establish that one of the principal mechanisms linking place satisfaction to place attachment is pro-environmental behavioral intention (PEB). The study further finds that gender moderates the relationship between PEB and place attachment. The conditional indirect effect of place satisfaction on place attachment is significant only for male visitors. The article closes with implications of the study for academics and practitioners.