• Keeping it in the family: exploring Igbo ethnic entrepreneurial behaviour in Nigeria

      Igwe, Paul Agu; Newbery, Robert; Amoncar, Nihar; White, Gareth R.T.; Madichie, Nnamdi O.; University of Lincoln; Newcastle Unviersity; University of South Wales; London School of Business and Management (Emerald, 2018-09-24)
      The purpose of this paper is to examine the attributes of the Igbos in Eastern Nigeria and the underlying factors influencing their entrepreneurial behaviour. More specifically, the study highlights the links between family, culture, institution and entrepreneurial behaviour in the African context. This paper is based on a qualitative research method by interviewing 50 entrepreneurs and community leaders of the Igbo nation. Igbos have been described as “naturally enterprising and ingenious” and can be found throughout Nigeria and West Africa. Understanding the vagaries of ethnic entrepreneurship can arguably only be achieved through research that is undertaken within these socio-historically rich, traditional and cultural contexts. Linked to the social learning theory, Igbo families provide an entrepreneurial leadership platform which influences youths through role models, providing mastery experiences and socialisation. The extended family provides a safe environment for risk taking, creativity and innovation. Also, an informal apprenticeship system provides entrepreneurial learning that prepares the younger generation to take to business as a way of life. The study is based on a relatively small sample size of 50 respondents, which makes it difficult to generalise the findings despite the benefits of the research methods adopted in the study. Also, there are limitations to the extension of the findings to a generalised Igbo population comprising individuals who may, or may not, behave entrepreneurially. There are significant practical implications, both nationally and internationally, for policy makers that are concerned with developing jobs for the growing population of unemployed youths and inclusive entrepreneurship in Nigeria. The research has three main contributions. First, it valorises indigenous knowledge of family and institutional entrepreneurial behaviour in an African context. Second, it highlights the importance of the linked institutions of the extended family and the informal apprenticeship system in Igbo culture. Finally, it provides a model and an explanation of how the Igbo culture nurtures and develops transgenerational entrepreneurial behaviour.
    • Key influences: Hilary Walker and Bill Beaumont

      Teague, Michael; Senior, Paul; Teesside University (Shaw and Sons, 2008)
    • Key skills and training needs of the D2N2 low carbon and environmental goods and services (LCEGS) sector

      Paterson, Fred; Baranova, Polina; Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; Clarke, Lewis; Wond, Tracey; Lee, Amanda; Gill, Judith M. R.; Gallotta, Bruno; Eisen, Matthew; et al. (University of Derby, 2018-07)
      Low Carbon is one of eight priority business sectors identified in the D2N2 Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) Strategic Economic Plan (2014 – 2023). In January 2018, Learndirect (on behalf of the LEP) commissioned Derby Business School to research the key skills required by the Low Carbon and Environmental Goods and Services (LCEGS) sector in D2N2; map existing training provision for the sector and establish the needs of key sector supply chains. The research finds that many of the key issues and challenges for businesses that supply LCEGS identified in previous reports remain. Suggests, surprisingly, that as many as 1 in 4 firms are doing business in the sector; with 1 in 20 firms deriving more than 80% of their turnover from LCEGS. Estimates the number of LCEGS suppliers in 5 key sectors to demonstrate where skills provision could be targeted. Highlights the variety of skills needed in different sectors and some of the issues, gaps and challenges facing skills providers. Proposes that pro-environmental suppliers and innovators should be identified in each priority sector and the current and future skills needs relevant to each sector established. The report concludes that much of the business activity currently categorised as Low Carbon sector can be re-framed as pro-environmental innovation in existing traditional sectors.
    • "A large can of worms": Teachers' perceptions of young people's technology use

      Betts, Lucy R.; Spenser, Karin A.; Nottingham Trent University; Division of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK; Division of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK (IGI Global, 2015-04)
      Digital technology use is increasingly impacting on the lives of young people. To gain a deeper understanding of the perceived impact of young people's digital technology use, 2 focus groups were conducted with 14 teachers recruited from 2 schools. The focus groups were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The analysis revealed three themes: changing social dynamics, risk and (ir)responsible behaviour, and disclosure and reporting of cyber bullying. Participants discussed how digital technology was shaping young people's social identity and impacting on established norms when interacting in the social arena. A number of benefits were attributed to technology use but participants also recognised young people's naivety and tendency to anthropomorphise the internet. Finally, there was a perception that young people underreported their experiences of cyber bullying and some of the challenges faced when tackling cyber bullying were discussed.
    • Law–finance–growth nexus in the context of Africa

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Essex (De Gruyter, 2018-04-26)
      This article seeks to put the law–finance–growth nexus into the context of Africa. As of 2017, the African Securities Exchanges Association has 27 securities exchanges as full members. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange is the most developed of all, especially with respect to its market capitalization. Its socio-legal proximity with the English system may provide a good explanation to its phenomenal growth relative to the rest in the region. However, such a socio-legal proximity is indeed shared by a number of other former British colonies such as Nigeria and Zimbabwe. Law alone may not account for the rise of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Furthermore, this article seeks to argue whether there is a genuine need for the African countries to have a stock market, which requires highly evolved legal, market and governmental institutions and norms that often do not pre-exist in these countries. On the one hand, the article will look at Africa in general. On the other hand, it will put certain discussions into the context of selected African countries.
    • LDBG loan and grant funding recipients

      Cowling, Marc; Nadeem, Simon Peter; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12-11)
    • Leadership in destination management organisations.

      Hristov, D; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Elsevier, 21/09/2016)
    • Learner identities in the context of undergraduates: a case study

      Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014-09-10)
      Background This paper examines the idea of learner identity of marketing undergraduates in the light of the widening participation agenda and identifies the challenges faced by those who enter HE by non-traditional routes. Purpose The research investigates the links between marketing students’ learner identities and their socio-economic backgrounds, previous experience of education and subject choice. It is hypothesised that marketing students, having selected a degree in a specific business discipline, are aware of employability issues and may be committed to their learning, leading to stronger learning identities than those evidenced in the literature about similar post-1992 universities. Sample The sample is all undergraduate marketing students at a University in England (the pseudonym UE is used throughout). The total available population was 135 and, of these, 99 completed the questionnaire. Non-UK students were excluded from the sample and one part-time student was excluded. This resulted in a total of 83 completed questionnaires for analysis. A sample of six self-selected students participated in follow-up interviews. Design and methods The primary research consists of a questionnaire administered to undergraduate marketing students and follow-up semi-structured interviews with a small number of students. The interviews examined issues in more depth and sought individual narratives of educational experience, with particular regard to the study of marketing and future employment and examined whether subject choice was in any way affected by previous educational experience, family background or ideas about employability. Results Links between learner identity and socio-economic background, educational experience and subject choice are shown. Nearly half the sample is shown to have positive learner identities but no link was found between subject choice and students’ thoughts on employability. Conclusions One should not presume students at lower-ranked universities to have poor learner identities as they may just be different, given their backgrounds and expectations, or actually be very strong. One should not presume that students of business disciplines are necessarily more focused on employability than other students.
    • Learning from experience, leading to engagement: lessons from belieforama for a Europe of religion and belief diversity

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Peeters, 2017)
      This paper takes as its starting point a description and analysis of a concrete training programme and community of practice (Belieforama-http://www. belieforama.eu) that seeks to address and embody a focus on lived experience and narratives, while going on to identify some lessons that might be drawn from this. Belieforama includes a generic training that addresses Religious Diversity and Anti-Discrimination; specific trainings on Overcoming Islamophobia, on Overcoming Antisemitism, and on Reconciling Religion, Gender and Sexual Orientation; and, finally, on Facilitation Skills and Taking Action. Over 2,000 people have taken part. It has won prizes for quality adult learning from the European Commission's Lifelong Learning Programme, and also the BMW Group's First Prize for Intercultural Commitment. Its approach was developed with input from both "religious" and "non-religious" organisations and people. It has been tested in a variety of national, language and other contexts. It works by drawing, in an interactive and inclusive way, on the lived experience and narrative of participants, aiming to bring them into better personal consciousness and also to take responsibility for action. This article highlights the learning reported by participants in Belieforama and discusses this with reference to wider potential lessons for a Europe of religion and belief diversity as well as specific recommendations relating to the European Union.
    • Legacies from nurturers in tourism; Inspiring people for communities.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (The University of Aveiro, 2017)
      In this paper a review of pre-requisites for supply side competency in developing community based tourism is offered. Using an interpretive and phenomenological approach, the skills, aptitudes and capacity to nurture within the community, are considered in a focus on improving a destination’s ability to sustain tourism as an element of development. This development agenda is dependent on marshalling an array of skills in a complex, differentiated and individualised marketplace. It is difficult to achieve triple-bottom line sustainability without acknowledging key skills in nurturing planning, policy interpretation, building of networks and partnerships, building relationships with other hosts in the community, understanding and interpreting triple-bottom line sustainability, mentoring others, understanding lifestyle choices, innovating whilst at all times enjoying and living a chosen life (Tinsley and Lynch, 2001). Nine UK based informants prioritise the antecedents of successful tourism development from a community based approach. This paper seeks to identify and illuminate practices amongst stakeholders termed ‘nurturers’ that develop tourism and destinations through excitement of image and identity, engagement of many and often diverse groups of people, capturing values and beliefs that are often inimitable and working with supportive public sector stakeholders.
    • Legal skills

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
    • A lesson on interrogations from detainees: Predicting self-reported confessions and cooperation

      Snook, Brent; Brooks, Dianna; Bull, Ray; University of Derby (Sage, 2015-09-21)
      The ability to predict confessions and cooperation from the elements of an interrogation was examined. Incarcerated men (N = 100) completed a 50-item questionnaire about their most recent police interrogation, and regression analyses were performed on self-reported decisions to confess and cooperate. Results showed that the likelihood of an interrogation resulting in a confession was greatest when evidence strength and score on a humanitarian interviewing scale were high, and when the detainee had few previous convictions or did not seek legal advice. We also found that the level of cooperation was greatest when the humanitarian interviewing score was high, and when previous convictions were low. The implications of the findings for interrogation practices are discussed.
    • Lessons learned: knowledge management and tourism development

      Clarke, Alan; Raffay, Agnes; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 2012-07-02)
    • Link between Islamic business and Wasta

      Ali, Sa'ad; University of Worcester (Winterwork, 2020-10-01)
      We can learn the falah economy concept – a well-being-oriented economy – from Islamic business. This goal has been around far longer than the sustainability debate, which started with the Brundtland Report in 1987. The falah economy also predates the Sustainable Development Goals by many centuries. These goals were announced in 2015 and adopted by all the United Nations‘ member states as a universal call to action to improve the environment and society by 2030. This book invites the reader on a journey of discovery of the key pillars of Islamic business, detailing its concepts and outlining how they impact corporate functions, such as finance, marketing, and human resources, while also shedding light on corporate behaviours with regard to, for example, contracts and charitable activities.
    • Linking different types of crime using geographical and temporal proximity

      Tonkin, Matthew; Woodhams, Jessica; Bull, Ray; Bond, John W.; Palmer, Emma J.; University of Leicester (2011)
      In the absence of forensic evidence (such as DNA or fingerprints), offender behavior can be used to identify crimes that have been committed by the same person (referred to as behavioral case linkage). The current study presents the first empirical test of whether it is possible to link different types of crime using simple aspects of offender behavior. The discrimination accuracy of the kilometer distance between offense locations (the intercrime distance) and the number of days between offenses (temporal proximity) was examined across a range of crimes, including violent, sexual, and property-related offenses. Both the intercrime distance and temporal proximity were able to achieve statistically significant levels of discrimination accuracy that were comparable across and within crime types and categories. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed and recommendations made for future research.
    • Local community attitudes and perceptions towards thermalism.

      Fleur, Stevens; Azara, Iride; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-02-28)
      Thermalism is enjoying a global resurgence of interest as consumers seek out ethical, natural, and place-based wellness experiences. In Europe, the ‘success rate of healing through thermalism has maintained the high reputation of thermal springs with curative powers’. However, thermalism has been culturally lost in the UK. This study focuses on a UK historical spa site currently undergoing restoration. Once restored, this will be one of three UK's only spa hotels with direct access to natural thermal mineral waters. An ethnographic case study design was used to explore community's perceptions and attitudes towards thermalism and the wellness tourism development model being implemented on location. Findings suggest that memories of the values and virtues of thermalism persist within the community and that, if harnessed, can play a significant role in supporting the local and national wellness agenda. However, findings also suggest that the reintroduction of thermal tourism in the location is perceived by the community as a luxury commodity reserved exclusively for the wealthy and elite members of society. Thermalism is a social and cultural resource and thus attention should be paid to ensure that any wellness tourism development model follows a cultural participatory logic and not solely an economic one.
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Location independent working in academia: Enabling employees or supporting managerial control?

      Lee, Amanda; Di Domenico, Marialaura; Saunders, Mark N. K.; Coventry University; The Open University; University of Surrey (Baywood Press, 2014-10)
      In this article, we consider the extent to which the practice of location independent working (LIW) enables academic employees to make choices and have agency in their life-work balance, and the extent to which it may support (or potentially be used as a form of resistance to) increased managerial control. Set within the context of an increasingly performanceled, managerialist public sector landscape, the impact and implications of these working practices are examined through the lens of labour process theory. Drawing on findings from an ongoing in-depth ethnographic study set in a post-1992 university business school in central England, we suggest that the practice of LIW is being used both to enable employees and to support managerial control.