• I'd love to but...

      Smith, Sue; University of Derby (First Press Publishing, 2015-12-28)
      This book is a brief account of how the power of coaching can empower ordinary people to achieve extraordinary goals. It outlines a number of characteristics, such as belief, focus, commitment, motivation and self-reliance; characteristics that during challenging times help to develop the strength required to be successful.
    • IBSA's trilateral constellation and its development fund: Valuable pioneers in development cooperation?

      Masters, Lesley; Landsberg, Chris; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Taylor and Francis, 2015-10-16)
      With a changing geopolitical landscape following the Northern-induced global financial meltdown, stagnation on global governance reform and failure to reach agreement on issues ranging from trade (Doha Development Round) to climate change (United Nations Convention on Climate Change), the India–Brazil–South Africa (IBSA) Dialogue Forum finds itself at the proverbial crossroads. At this point, with no summit having taken place since 2011, the future of IBSA is uncertain in part because the three IBSA partners have allowed ambivalence and lack of leadership to hold sway. Yet the current fluidity in the international environment has ironically meant that IBSA is more relevant and needed than ever before. IBSA is well placed to play a vital role in arresting the current trajectory of the global governance architecture, particularly when it comes to concerns of development. As this article argues, it is in the area of development cooperation that IBSA has found its niche in demonstrating the possibilities that development diplomacy and South–South cooperation avail, while challenging traditional norm conceptions when it comes to the future of international development financial institutions. Yet the question remains as to how this will be used going forward, as there is little strategic discussion between the trilateral partners on the future of development diplomacy and the IBSA Fund.
    • The idea of legal convergence and international economic law

      Platsas, Antonios E.; International Institute for the Sociology of Law, Oñati, Spain; University of Derby (Inderscience Publishers, 2009)
      The convergence of different legal systems is one of the leading theses in the discipline of law. This paper proposes that international economic law is one of the great sources of inspiration for the coming together of various legal systems around the world. The paper will explore the European Union experience in this respect and it will analyse a number of legal principles which promote the idea of legal convergence in the sphere of international economic law. Furthermore, referral will be made to the organisations promoting the convergence of legal systems such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank Group (WB) and the World Trade Organization (WTO).
    • Identifying critical success factors in Key Account Management, along with characteristics of Key Account Managers, in order to develop a new model and approach to implementation

      Veasey, Christian; University of Derby (British Academy of Management, 2016-09-07)
      This research was a developmental paper ‘Identifying critical success factors in key account management, along with characteristics of key account managers, in order to develop a new model and approach to implementation.
    • Identity, politics, and the future(s) of religion in the UK: the case of the religion questions in the 2001 decennial census

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2004-01)
      With the publication of the results of the United Kingdom's decennial Census questions on religion it is important to situate this data within the wider social and religious contexts that led to the inclusion of these questions in the Census. This includes engagement with some of the issues likely to affect both the data itself and the uses to which it might be put. The varied forms of the questions on religion as asked in different parts of the UK are outlined within the context of a discussion of the scholarly taxonomy of religions. The questions are also explored in the light of the interplay between the varied categories of religions and the official ‘recognition’ implied by their use within the Census. Finally, the place of religious statistics within the ‘politics of identity’ as well as their potential contribution to the development of a communalist ‘identity politics’ are critically explored.
    • The IMF and a new global politics of inequality?

      Nunn, Alex; White, Paul; University of Derby; Leeds Beckett University (Australian Political Economy Movement, 2017-01)
      This paper addresses a simple, and largely empirical, research question: is the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) recent high level commitment to reducing inequality translated into concrete action in its dealings with member states? Addressing this research question is significant in several respects. First, the high level rhetorical commitment to reduce inequality might be seen as paradoxical because the IMF, alongside other institutions of global economic management, has long been criticised for its role in promoting economic reform in member countries, partly on the basis that this increases inequality (Peet et al. 2009; Kentikelenis et al. 2016: 550-1). It is therefore important to assess the extent to which recent pronouncements on inequality by the Fund suggest a change in emphasis or a genuine institutional commitment. Second, addressing the question contributes to a contemporary academic literature on more technical aspects of how we should understand and interpret IMF policy advice and conditionality. This literature currently focusses on a range of aspects of IMF policy advice, but does not address the recent interest of the Fund in inequality. The paper addresses this lacuna.
    • Impact of board independence on the quality of community disclosures in annual reports.

      Yekini, K.C; Adelopo, I; Andrikopoulos, P; Yekini, Liafisu Sina; Coventry University (Taylor and Francis, 27/02/2019)
      This study investigates the link between board independence and the quality of community disclosures in annual reports. Using content analysis and a panel dataset from UK FTSE 350 companies the results indicate a statistically significant relationship between board independence, as measured by the proportion of nonexecutive directors, and the quality of community disclosures, while holding constant other corporate governance and firm specific variables. The study indicates that companies with more non-executive directors are likely to disclose higher quality information on their community activities than others. This finding offers important insights to policy makers who are interested in achieving optimal board composition and furthers our understanding of the firm's interaction with its corporate and extended environment through high-quality disclosures. The originality of this paper lies in the fact that it is the first to specifically examine the relationship between outside directors and community disclosures in annual reports. The paper contributes both to the corporate governance and community disclosure literature.
    • The impact of context on real-life serious crime interviews

      Leahy-Harland, Samantha; Bull, Ray; Bournemouth University; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-11-25)
      This study examined real-life audio-taped police interviews with 56 serious crime suspects in England and Wales. It provides an analysis of how suspects responded and behaved during the interviews and considers how suspects’ responses may be affected by contextual characteristics including the presence of legal advisors. It was found that fewer suspects admitted these serious offences in comparison to previous studies, with most suspects who did admit doing so early on in the interview. The majority of suspects’ responses were identified as ‘relevant’, only a very small proportion of interviews were assessed as ‘challenging’. Significant associations between suspects’ responses and context were found. Specifically, if the (alleged) victim was female, the location of the offence was in-doors, and there was no clear motive, then suspects were more likely to say ‘no comment’ than to respond relevantly. Suspects who were 32 years of age or over, and had previous criminal convictions, were more likely to respond ‘relevantly’ than say ‘no comment’. The study also found that whilst present in the majority of interviews, the contributions of legal advisors were minimal (though more frequent legal advisor contributions were associated with increased use of police strategies).
    • Impact of gender on use of wasta among human resources management practitioners

      Alsarhan, Fadi; Ali, Sa'ad; Weir, David; Valax, Marc; Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin, iaelyon, Magellan, Lyon, France; University of Derby; Huddersfield University; York St John University; IAE Nice, Nice, France (Wiley, 2020-12-14)
      The practice of wasta dominates all aspects of Arabs’ lives; it is a parallel inegalitarian system that categorizes people according to their connections. One of the epicenters of wasta is human resources management (HRM). This paper studies the concept of wasta in the Arab world by examining its use in HRM according to gender, in the case of the Jordanian public sector. Results obtained from 27 semi-structured interviews of HR managers indicate that though wasta is an important feature of HRM in general, there is a notable discrepancy between male and female employees, with the former displaying higher tendencies for using wasta than the latter. An explanation for this finding is the prevalent masculine nature of Jordanian society, which entails social caveats related to the traditional role of women. Professional determinants, such as gendered job segregation and variance in qualifications, also affect men’s and women’s access to wasta
    • The impact of interviewer working hours on police interviews with children

      Kyriakidou, Marilena; Blades, Mark; Cherryman, Julie; Christophorou, Stephanie; Kamberis, Andreas; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Sheffield; University of Portsmouth; University of Maastricht, Netherlands; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-05-18)
      Fatigue resulting from unpredictable or extended working conditions is a factor that negatively impacts the performance of police officers. In this study, we considered how investigative interviewing of children is influenced by interviewer working conditions. We examined two working conditions concerning when interviews were conducted: (a) during early duty shift and (b) an hour before the end of an interviewer’s duty shift and after the end of a shift. We analysed 102 police interviews with children and identified clues that interviews which commenced during early duty shift had more appropriate approaches than interviews in the other condition. Inappropriate approaches were not significantly affected by interviewer working conditions. These outcomes suggest considering new knowledge specific to the behaviour of interviewers according to working conditions and provide promising foundations for further research.
    • The impact of interviewer working hours on police interviews with children

      Kyriakidou, Marilena; Blades, Mark; Cherryman, Julie; Christophorou, Stephanie; Kamberis, Andreas; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Sheffield; University of Portsmouth; University of Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-05-18)
      Fatigue resulting from unpredictable or extended working conditions is a factor that negatively impacts the performance of police officers. In this study, we considered how investigative interviewing of children is influenced by interviewer working conditions. We examined two working conditions concerning when interviews were conducted: (a) during early duty shift and (b) an hour before the end of an interviewer’s duty shift and after the end of a shift. We analysed 102 police interviews with children and identified clues that interviews which commenced during early duty shift had more appropriate approaches than interviews in the other condition. Inappropriate approaches were not significantly affected by interviewer working conditions. These outcomes suggest considering new knowledge specific to the behaviour of interviewers according to working conditions and provide promising foundations for further research.
    • The impact of Investors in people: a case study of a hospital trust

      Grugulis, Irena; Bevitt, Sheena; University of Derby (Wiley Blackwell, 2002-07)
      This article reports on case study research conducted in a hospital Trust and explores the impact that the Investors in People award had on employees. Investors in People is widely seen as the principal mechanism for increasing workforce skills within a voluntarist system as well as supporting ‘good’ employment policies. Yet in this case study, as elsewhere, most of the ‘soft’ human resource initiatives had existed prior to accreditation and the internal marketing of corporate value statements was met with both amnesia and cynicism. More worryingly, training activity was focused on business need, and business need was defined in the narrowest sense, with the result that some employees had fewer opportunities for individual development. Motivation and commitment levels were high, staff were enthusiastic about their work and many actively engaged in training and development. But this owed little to Investors in People and its impact here raises questions about its influence on skill levels more broadly.
    • The impact of religiosity on earnings quality: International evidence from the banking sector

      Omoteso, Kamil; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-10-02)
      We examine the impact of religiosity on earnings quality, utilising a global sample of 1,283 listed banks headquartered in 39 countries and covering the period 2002–2018. Using instrumental variables two-stage least squares regressions, we demonstrate that religiosity has a significant positive impact on banks’ earnings quality. We further show that the impact of religiosity becomes more pronounced among banks headquartered in countries where religion is an important element of national identity and in countries with weak legal protection. We show that the effects of religiosity are more intense during the global financial crisis period. Overall, these findings support the notion that high religiosity tends to reduce unethical activities by managers and can function as an alternative control mechanism for minimising agency costs. Our empirical investigation is robust to alternative model sample specification.
    • Impact of remittances on economic growth in developing countries: The role of openness

      Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; University of Derby (De Gruyter, 2017-03-28)
      The paper examines the empirical relationship between remittances and economic growth for a sample of 62 developing countries over the time period 1990–2014. Remittances seem to promote growth only in the ‘more open’ countries. That is because remittances are in themselves not sufficient for growth. The extent of the benefit depends on domestic institutions and macroeconomic environment in the receiving country. Unlike the ‘less open’ countries, ‘more open’ countries have better institutions and better financial markets to take advantage of the remittances income and channelise them into profitable investments which, in turn, accelerates the rate of economic growth in these countries.
    • Impact of sustainability practices on hospitality consumers’ behaviors and attitudes: The case of LUX* resorts & hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Movondo, Felix; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      The growing volume of research on customers’ attitudes towards sustainability practices in the hospitality sector has attracted significant interest from researchers and managers in the past decade. This chapter investigates the relationship between sustainability practices in hotels and its influence on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors, and the brand. Using LUX* Resorts & Hotels as a case study, this chapter provides insights into the growing importance of sustainability practices among resorts and hotels. It shows how consumers play an important role in shifting a business strategy towards a more sustainable course. This chapter will be of value to practitioners in helping them align their strategies with customers’ expectations. It contributes to the pool of studies on sustainability in hotels and resorts, which will assist researchers in furthering research and reflection in this area.
    • The impact of the homelessness reduction act 2017 on women survivors who have experienced domestic abuse, Part I

      Moss, Kate; Reubens, Tilly; University of Wolverhampton (Sweet and Maxwell, 2018-10-01)
    • The impact of the homelessness reduction act 2017 on women survivors who have experienced domestic abuse, Part II

      Moss, Kate; Rubens, Tilly; University of Wolverhampton (Sweet and Maxwell, 2018)
    • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • The importance of personal values and hospitableness in small foodservice businesses’ social responsibility

      Tomasella, Barbara; Ali, Alisha; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Intellect Ltd, 2019)
      This paper investigates the relationship between personal values, hospitableness and social responsibility in small, independent foodservice businesses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 owner-managers of these businesses located in Sheffield, United Kingdom (UK). The results established that hospitableness is expressed through the way in which these small businesses engage in social responsibility. In lifestyle and family businesses, personal values, such as altruism, friendliness and a passion for food, influence the hospitableness and social responsibility of the small foodservice business. In the long term, social responsibility actions expressing hospitableness add value to the business itself. This research contributes to the hospitality literature, by empirically demonstrating how hospitableness can be expressed through small business social responsibility, which can provide, in the long term, a competitive advantage for small, independent foodservice businesses.