• Early effects of the economic downturn on the Welfare to Work System in deprived areas (WP83)

      Nunn, Alex; Bickerstaffe, Tim; Jassi, Sukky; Wymer, Penny; Leeds Beckett University (Department for Work and Pensions, 2010)
      This report investigates the early effects of the recent economic downturn on the 'welfare to work infrastructure' in deprived areas, in particular how it is able to continue to provide support to the most disadvantaged groups. The report provides context that will inform the Department for Work and Pensions and Jobcentre Plus’ response to the recent (and future) recessions in relation to support for disadvantaged areas and groups. The evidence presented also functions as a qualitative baseline against which the perceived success, within deprived areas, of measures to minimise the long-term impacts of the recession (e.g. the Young Person's Guarantee) canbe considered.
    • Economic interdependence in a globalised world - the effects of Greece's financial crises on Derbyshire businesses

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Derby Telegraph, 2013)
      Greece, in recent years, has suffered series of financial crises that necessitated massive European bailouts to support and sustain the country's economy. The bailouts and support from the IMF and the European Central Bank came with stringent economic conditions that have caused severe political turmoil in the country. This article, published by Derby Telegraph, examines the nature and effect of economic interdependency in a globalised world. Using, the recent financial crises as case study; the article explains how the economic woes in countries like Greece and Portugal could hit Derbyshire businesses.
    • Edible insects and their acceptance in western societies

      Jauniskis, Pijus; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2020-11-27)
      This paper examines current literature on edible insect consumption in western culture through an inductive lens, addressing environmental, nutritional, food security, anthropological and psychological aspects of the topic. Findings show that western aversion towards edible insects is deeply psychological and cultural, mostly ignoring the pleasure dimensions such as taste, texture and flavour. The nature of the problem appears to be predominantly social. Results suggest that a beneficial route of introducing edible insects into the western diet could be formed through a societal perspective. Tourism and hospitality can potentially play a big part in the edible insect development. For instance, food as a tourism product can attract visitors from different backgrounds whilst food consumption as a tourism experience subliminally promises an experience of novelty and potential newfound pleasure in food. Food as an integral part of various cultures and local heritages entails local dishes that can be considered ‘cultural artifacts’ and their consumption symbolises the consumption of ‘other’. Tourism experiences can expose an individual to lasting personal change, self-discovery and intellectual development. Hence, taking into consideration that acquiring new cultural knowledge increases openness to experience, it is possible that tourism could contribute to adopting the practice of insect consumption in the western cultural sphere.
    • Educating Britain? Political Literacy and the Construction of National History

      Brocklehurst, Helen; Swansea University (John Wiley and Sons, 2014)
      Despite the reflexive nature of historical enquiry and the degree of national interconnectness now theorized by historians in the United Kingdom, education debates over history teaching in Britain often yield a comforting defence of Britain's 'island story'. The singular 'island story' is an economical narrative device favoured by politicians and further mediated through newspapers which profit from such national cryogenics. Maintenance of a currency, or crisis, of Britishness can also be contrasted with the relative absence of longitudinal or comparative enquiry into identity and school curricula. In addition, the teaching of states, connections and post-sovereign communities is largely under-theorized, potentially contributing to the sterility of future debates about citizenship, agency and Britain’s wider political reach. It is argued here that the public framing of history as nationhood and the underdevelopment of children’s political literacy are mutually reinforcing conditions by which the state has constructed a stabilizing, yet shifting presence of the ‘national’.
    • The effect of co-offender planning on verbal deception

      Chan, Stephanie; Bull, Ray; Home Team Behavioural Science Centre; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2013-09-13)
      Previous deception studies have mainly examined individual mock perpetrators and their deceptive behaviours during interviews, but not all crimes are committed by single perpetrators. In the present study, 48 mock perpetrators were individually interviewed after carrying out a mock theft in pairs. The time available for co-planning prior to the interview was manipulated so as to examine its effects on participants’: (1) verbal cues to deception; (2) cognitive load; and (3) attempted speech control during the interview. Having time available for planning was associated with greater statement immediacy, plausibility and within-pair consistency, but not with cognitive load or attempted control.
    • The Effect of Lighting on Crime Counts

      Fotios, Steve; Robbins, Chloe; Farrall, Stephen; University of Sheffield; University of Derby (MDPI, 2021-07-07)
      The influence of lighting on crime was investigated by considering the effect of ambient light level on crimes recorded in three US cities for the ten-year period 2010 to 2019. Crime counts were compared for similar times of day, before and after the biannual clock change, therefore employing an abrupt change of light level but without an obvious intervention such as improving road lighting in an area. The results suggest a significant increase in robbery during darkness, confirming previous studies. The results also suggest darkness leads to an increase in arson and curfew loitering offenses, and to a decrease in disorderly conduct, family offences (non-violent) and prostitution. Future research investigating the effectiveness of improved street lighting should consider that this may not be beneficial for all types of crime.
    • The effects of local socio-political events on group cohesion in online far-right communities

      Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Betts, John M.; Faulkner, Nicholas; Vergani, Matteo; Chow, Rui Jie; Iqbal, Muhammad; Best, David; University of Dundee; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; et al. (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2020-03-30)
      In recent years, the reach and influence of far-right ideologies have been extended through online communities with devastating effects in the real world. In this research, we examine how far-right online communities can be empowered by socio-political events that are significant to them. Using over 14 years of data extracted from an Australian national sub-forum of a global online white supremacist community, we investigate whether the group cohesion of the community is affected by local race riots. Our analysis shows that the online community, not only became more cohesive after the riots, but was also reinvigorated by highly active new members who joined during the week of the riots or soon after. These changes were maintained over the longer-term, highlighting pervasive ramifications of the local socio-political context for this white supremacist community. Pre-registered analyses of data extracted from other white supremacist online communities (in South Africa and the United Kingdom) show similar effects on some of the indicators of group cohesion, but of reduced magnitude, and not as enduring as the effects found in the context of the Australian far-right online community.
    • Elderly persons' mobility situation and use of public transport in England and Wales. A logistic regression analysis.

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Population Association of America, 1995-04)
      This paper examines the mobility situation of elderly people in England and Wales. The paper analyses elderly peoples' use of public transport for local movements and the degree to which each transport mode is considered "convenient" for that purpose. Using a logistic regression procedure as conceptualized in a dichotomous situation, the paper examines how elderly people's socio-medical conditions or disability could affect their "convenient" use of transport. The paper, based on a survey conducted in 1993, shows that the degree of mobility "deprivation" among elderly people depends on the type and severity of their physical/medical conditions. The study specifically reveals that mobility problems are significant among elderly people that have locomotion disability, and cardiovascular and arthritis conditions. The paper offers some practical suggestions on how the main-stream transport facilities could be improved to make them more accessible to elderly people.
    • The emerging conditions of meta-modernism: an observation-based interpretivist perspective on the curious case of Royal Enfield

      Amoncar, Nihar; Deacon, Jonathan; University of South Wales (Academy of Marketing, 2016-07-07)
      The paper aims to propose the emerging conditions Meta-modernism through an observation based, interpretivist perspective on Royal Enfield, an erstwhile iconic British motorcycle manufacturer from Redditch, England. The company went out of business in the UK, however, what remained of the company was a single functioning manufacturing plant in India, which was established in 1955. The company was saved from disappearing all together in 1994 by Eicher Group (a diverse automotive firm, better known as the manufacturer for Eicher Mitsubishi trucks in India). Fast-forward to 2015, at a time when the entire motorcycle industry in India is struggling (overall motorcycle sales in India were down 4.06 per cent during April to September 2015), Royal Enfield defied the trend by posting over 50 per cent sales growth during the April-September 2015 period (Doval, 2015; economictimes.indiatimes.com, 2015). This paper explores the authors’ perspective over some of the Marketing methods that attempts to propose possible reasons behind Royal Enfield, today, boasting a ‘niche’ bike manufacturer image not just in its home market of India but again: globally. Market segmentation is to understate the cult following the company has in terms of fans and enthusiasts of the brand and the product. Hence the paper unashamedly and in line with the meta-modernist view, revisits the concepts of post-modernism and tribe and seeks to gain insight into phenomena through this lens, attempting to explain and justify the use of culture, heritage, tribes and a disruptive marketing ‘campaign’ by a company which was on the brink of collapse, but has recently raced past Harley Davidson in terms of global sales.
    • The emerging inter-faith context In society and religious education.

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Mohr Siebeck, 2016)
      The chapter explores the emerging inter-faith context in England, including the explicit inter-faith initiatives associated with this context, as both of these have interfaced with the development of school-based Religious Education since 1970. It does this through an overview of the changing religion and belief landscape of England as this gave birth to the emergence of early inter-faith initiatives and what might be called a new inter-faith “imaginary". It then traces the impact of a diverse religion and belief England on the development of Religious Education discussing how far via the engagement of schools, universities and communities there has been an interaction or parallelism of development between inter-faith context, inter-faith initiatives and Religious Education. It then outlines and discusses how more inclusive approaches to Religious Education have been resourced, including in relation to national inter-faith initiatives leading into debate about the relationship within Religious Education between religion and belief, the secular and a broadening understanding of “world religions”. Finally, the present and future of Religious Education in England is critically explored in relation to how it is situated within what might be called a "three dimensional” social and religious interface between Christianity, secularity and increasing religious plurality.
    • Emotions, future selves and the process of desistance.

      Hunter, Ben; Farrall, Stephen; University of Sheffield; University of Greenwich (Oxford University Press, 2017-03-21)
      Desistance research emphasizes that offenders identify a future self that aids desistance efforts. However, it is unclear how future selves operate when offending opportunities arise. To explore this, we employ qualitative accounts of instances when offenders and ex-offenders abstained from offending, and the emotions this evoked. Offending was avoided to preserve aspects of offenders’ lives or avoid negative consequences but, for some, avoiding offending brought frustration. Finally, those who had made the most progress towards desistance were less likely to identify opportunities for offending. These findings suggest future selves inform the desistance process, highlighting particular ways to be. However, time is needed to build up valued aspects of the life that may be feared lost if engaging in crime. Before the benefits of abstaining are recognized, there may be a tension between the future and current self.
    • An empathetic approach: Using appreciative inquiry to gain balanced insights

      Veasey, Christian; Lawson, Alison; Hancock, Charles; University of Derby (Academy of Marketing, 2021-07-07)
      Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is described as a collaborative approach to the exploration and development of investigations with informed consideration of what is working well, as opposed to a problem-solving approach (Reed, 2010). The traditional problem-solving approach starts from the point of view that ‘xyz is not working in the abc department’ and has a potential disadvantage in that it focuses on the participants, so participants may feel as if they are under scrutiny and that the researcher is seeking someone to blame for the issue or problem (Goldberg and Commins, 2001). Moreover, this approach focuses on problems that may lead to negatively perceived outcomes, whereas concentrating on positivity, strengths, successes, achievements, positive choices, positive resources, energy and assets can lead to enhanced outcomes and the sustainability of existing strengths (Carter, 2006).
    • An empirical study on the building blocks of resilience in British food supply chains in case of Brexit

      Liravi, Pouria; Polychronakis, Yiannis; Fassam, Liam; University of Derby; University of Salford; University of Northampton (2020-12)
      In the wake of Britain’s referendum results, which will lead to the UK leaving the EU, the pressures on British food supply chains to obtain safe and secure sources of supply has increased. This study aims to investigate “resilience” as a form of capability for risk mitigation within food supply chains. To achieve this aim, three major food companies, that have an active presence in British food supply chains, have contributed to this study. This empirical research adapted a multiple case study approach and used qualitative data to interpret answers to the research questions. Semi-structured interview questions were the principal data collection method. To increase the credibility and validity of the research findings, observational studies and document archival reviews were conducted and their findings were triangulated against the findings of interview responses. This research drew a theoretical framework for resilient food supply chains. The buying power and buying behaviour of large companies can not only affect their direct and indirect partners in supply chains, but also affect other companies, that are not in any supply chain relationship with the organisation. None-availability of products due to various external, internal factors can effectively distort food supply chains and jeopardise the flow of activities of companies. Financial strength of supply chain partners is considered as an essential criterion for entering business relationships, especially for the transport and logistics companies within the food supply chains. The ease of communication, amongst various levels of staff members of organisations, which consequently leads to a resilient supply chain. The capabilities of a procurement department in enabling resilience in food supply chains was highlighted and it was claimed that the extent of development of this role is closely related to the ability of the company, to fulfil its orders in the time of Brexit.
    • Employee as Student Toolkit

      Wond, Tracey; Nesterova, Iana; Rambukwella, Shan; Kelleher, Orla; University of Derby (2016-02)
      The ‘Employee as Student’ Toolkit supports higher education institutions (HEIs) to measure and demonstrate the value of postgraduate programmes when used as a development option by organisations. One of two evaluation toolkits funded by the HEFCE Postgraduate Support Scheme
    • Employing a value-belief-norm framework to gauge Carthage residents’ intentions to support sustainable cultural heritage tourism

      Megeihi, Huda El; Woosnam, Kyle Maurice; Ribeiro, Manuel Alector; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Denley, Tara Joyce; University of derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-03-16)
      In light of the recent conflicts in Carthage over land use, Cultural heritage preservation, and sustainable tourism, this work utilized a value-belief-norm (VBN) theoretical framework to consider psychological antecedents of residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. As such, personal values, cultural worldview, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, and subjective norms were considered antecedents of intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. Data were collected from 475 Carthage residents in nine neighborhoods adjacent to UNESCO World Heritage Sites using an on-site self-administered questionnaire. The proposed model was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (to demonstrate sound psychometric properties across all 11 factors within the model), followed by structural equation modelling. Overall, 15 of the 19 proposed hypotheses were supported, ultimately contributing to 28% of the variance explained in residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. This work not only provides support for the utilization of the VBN model within the context of cultural heritage tourism, it also deepens our understanding of the theoretical framework through the inclusion of the multi-dimensional construct cultural worldview.
    • Empowering women for positive action in an era of social injustice and gender inequality.

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-11-22)
      Empowering women for positive action in an era of social injustice and gender inequality
    • Energy law and policy in Nigeria with reflection on the International Energy Charter and domestication of the African Charter

      Ekhator, Eghosa; Agbaitoro, Godswill; University of Derby; University of Essex (Pretoria University Press, 2019-12)
      The aim of this chapter is to examine the benefits of the International Energy Charter (IEC) to signatory countries with a view to illustrating its future relevance and potential influence in respect of energy laws and policies in Nigeria. The intended outcome of the chapter is to highlight the critical role of the IEC in global energy governance and its impact on Nigeria. Moreover, it will discuss how the IEC has contributed to the ability of signatory countries to enhance international cooperation aimed at addressing common energy challenges while enabling them to harness their full energy resource potential. The research question sought to be answered is whether the IEC has the requisite elements to transform Nigeria’s energy laws and policies so as to bring about positive outcomes in the country’s energy sector. The chapter argues that lessons can be gleaned from the successful domestication and implementation of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Charter) in Nigeria in this regard.
    • Enforcement strategies in Chinese capital market

      Huang, Flora; Liu, Junhai; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-11-25)
      This chapter discusses the varieties of enforcement channels to protect investors, especially minority shareholders in the Chinese capital market. These channels include public enforcement by regulators such as the China Securities Regulatory Authority and the stock exchanges, and private enforcement in the form of litigations enabled by corporate and securities laws. Furthermore, alternative dispute resolutions are increasingly popular to resolve disputes. In this chapter, it is argued that all these enforcement channels together function as part of a comprehensive and integrated regulatory strategy to provide the much-needed law in action to support the phenomenal economic and financial growth in the country.
    • Engaging new Law lecturers and reflections on the engagement

      Cherkassky, Lisa; Gale, Christopher; Guth, Jessica; University of Bradford (2009)