• Calling the judiciary to account for the past : transitional justice and judicial accountability in Nigeria.

      Yusuf, Hakeem O.; University of Glasgow (2008-03-19)
      Institutional and individual accountability is an important feature of societies in transition from conflict or authoritarian rule. The imperative of accountability has both normative and transformational underpinnings in the context of restoration of the rule of law and democracy. This article argues a case for extending the purview of truth-telling processes to the judiciary in postauthoritarian contexts. The driving force behind the inquiry is the proposition that the judiciary as the third arm of government at all times participates in governance. To contextualize the argument, I focus on judicial governance and accountability within the paradigm of Nigeria’s transition to democracy after decades of authoritarian military rule.
    • Can Facebook improve students’ engagement in flipped classes? Community of inquiry approach

      Talaei-Khoei, Amir; Daniel, Jay; Dokhanchi, Mohsen; University of Nevada; University of Derby; University of Queensland (HICSS, 2020-01-07)
      This paper aims at using Facebook to improve the students’ engagements with the flipped learning materials through implementation of a socially enabled peer learning environment. The article reports an experiment comparing the online quizzes and Facebook to increase the students’ engagement with the online materials in flipped classes. The study looks at the students’ perceptions. The current study utilizes the Community of Inquiry (RCOI) to analyze the students’ opinions about using Facebook for implementation of flipped learning. The paper provides recommendations to the instructors on how to use Facebook for increasing the students’ engagement with the flipped materials. This study also motivates teaching practitioners in Information Systems to improve flipped learning by using social networking sites in their courses.
    • Can flow state enhance learning on culinary arts programmes?

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2012-05-09)
      The research conducted investigates who is marketing what, to whom, and why. Finally conclusions/theories will be suggested as to the future of a ‘new’ form of culinary artistry as a form of academic rigour and relevance in terms of sustainability and growth of a 20 credit framework. “Repression is not the way to virtue. When people restrain themselves out of fear, their lives are by necessity diminished. Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed and still kept within the bounds of reason."[ Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1998)
    • Can local finance add value to local small business? Evidence from a UK local loan and grant fund

      Cowling, Marc; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Foster, Carley; Baranova, Polina; University of Derby (Senate Hall Academic Publishing, 2020-05)
      Access to finance is a key constraint on the creation, survival, and growth of SMEs, and this issue has prompted governments to directly intervene in financial markets, but has also led to the development of new forms of financial intermediation and new players in the market encouraged by a desire to increase competition in the market. Today these new forms of financing and new players in the market are in part complementary to more established sources, but also potential substitutes particularly for those businesses that are most constrained. In this paper we use new data from a survey of local small businesses to assess whether access to a local loan and grant fund has added value to supported businesses. Our findings suggest that there are tangible benefits associated with local finance provision that are likely to generate a positive local economic multiplier that extends beyond the funding period.
    • Capacities of business incubator and regional innovation performance

      Wang, Zhaoxing; He, Qile; Xia, Senmao; Sarpong, David; Xiong, Ailun; Maas, Gideon; Coventry University; University of Derby; Brunel University London; Chongqing Technology and Business University, China (Elsevier, 2020-06-04)
      Recent years have witnessed the fast development of business incubators in many emerging economies, such as China. Business incubators are seen as important facilitators for innovation which provide office space, equipment, mentoring services, as well as financial, legal and administrative supports for technology entrepreneurs and start-up companies. Much investment has been undertaken to facilitate the development of business incubators, for example in financial frameworks, human resource development and communication infrastructure. This paper investigates the effects of business incubator capacities on the regional innovation performance, using a panel representing 31 Chinese provinces. This study finds that three capacities of business incubators have significant impacts on the regional innovation performance, while the incubation capacity appears to have a much greater effect than the basic capacity and the finance capacity. Moreover, this study also identifies that the regional communication infrastructure is an important moderator of the relationship between business incubator capacities and the regional innovation performance. This paper supports the view that emerging economies should encourage the development of business incubators in order to promote the development of technology entrepreneurs and domestic innovation performance, but more focus should be on creating free knowledge transfer platforms.
    • Case 13: Exploring employees experiences of remote working practices

      Lee, Amanda; University of Derby (Pearson, 2019-04-24)
    • A case study for merging supply chain and blockchain in Australian manufacturer

      Daniel, Jay; Maroun, E; Fynes, B; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (POMS, 2021)
      This paper examines implementation of Blockchain technology within an Australian manufacturer supply chain. We present a summary of the challenges in adopting this technology. The adoption of Blockchain technology has potential to bring greater transparency, validity across supply chain processes, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders and customers involved.
    • Certainty over clemency: English contract law in the face of financial crisis

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Leicester (Springer, 2016)
      This chapter has the objective to consider the legal implications of negative economic trends under English contract law in the aftermath of the global Financial Crisis of 2007–2008. Unlike other jurisdictions, most notably in civil law countries, the English position in the law governing a fundamental change in circumstances has remained narrow, that is, no relief will be granted unless it is an exceptional situation. The English courts deal with the issue either by the doctrine of frustration or through construing contractual force majeure provisions. Following the crisis, indeed there have been an increasing number of cases going down these avenues. Apart from relying on frustration or force majeure clause, another emerging phenomenon is that there has been a growth in allegations of misrepresentation and therefore requesting a rescission of contract. In either case, the aim of claimants is apparently trying to bring the contractual obligations to an end.
    • Challenges in managing peripheral workers within diverse environments.

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Melpignano, Claudia; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
      This paper explores the HR issues that tour operators experience in the planning, coordination and management of tours revolving around cycling events. It does so by using a tour operator based in the UK as a case study and by deploying a qualitative ethnographic approach. This methodology was deemed as the most fitting to enable an in-depth and rich analysis of the issues that characterise the complex management of core (office-based employees) and peripheral workers (tour guides on the event site). Not only do the different operations, time frames, environments and activities within which the employees operate result in the company’s workforce division into two distinctive groups, but they also determine low levels of professional satisfaction and motivation among the tour guides. Investigating the stances held by the company’s employees in relation to the difficulties encountered in the workplace is necessary to develop a strategy that allows for retaining peripheral workers, for creating synergy between the two different teams, and consequently for ensuring the achievement of the organization’s goals and objectives. The findings highlight how the adoption of HR practices that aim at enhancing the company’s internal marketing would entail an optimistic shift in the tour guides’ perception of their position within the company, resulting in improved product delivery and reduced absenteeism, burnout and turnover challenges
    • Changing socio-religious realities: Practical negotiation of transitions in the governance of religion or belief, state and society

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Peeters, 2020-12)
      This article argues for the importance of developing forms of governance with regard to the relationship between religion or belief, state and society in Europe so as to better reflect and “reality-match” the contemporary socio-religious realities characteristic of a continuing Christian inheritance along with an increasing secularity and growth in religious plurality, than do current patterns that usually embody privilege for a particular Christian Church or Churches largely derived from Christendom models. Having noted that recognising a need for change, deciding on a direction for change, and actually implementing change are three different things, the article draws on a social contextualist approach to the application of negotiation theory in relation to organizational change as developed by Charles Samuelson and David Messick (1995) in order to illuminate factors that can either hinder and / or facilitate such developments.
    • Charlie Hebdo and the prophet Muhammad: a multimodal critical discourse analysis of peace and violence in a satirical cartoon

      Kilby, Laura; Lennon, Henry; Sheffield Hallam University (Springer International Publishing, 2018-11-30)
      In this chapter, we examine how ideologies of peace and violence can be (re)produced and communicated via multiple semiotic forms that include, but are not restricted to, language. We grapple with the complexity and importance of the situated-ness of peace and violence, and consider, what does peace, indeed what can peace, look like in a social context where meaning and expression are both multiple and contested. To this end, we undertake a case study analysis, exploring how a multimodal text might be variously interpreted as an explicit display of peace and forgiveness, and yet simultaneously as an oppressive act which knowingly causes offense. In addressing these issues, we relate to Galtung’s (1996, p. 196) typology of violence, and we consider the issue of cultural violence, which he defines as “those aspects of culture, the symbolic sphere of our existence […] that can be used to legitimize direct or structural violence.
    • Chasing a pot of gold: an analysis of emerging recovery-oriented addiction policies in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands

      Bellaert, Lore; Martinelli, Thomas; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Best, David; van de Mheen, Dike; Vander Laenen, Freya; Ghent University; Tilberg University, The Netherlands; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-04-26)
      Following the paradigm shift to recovery in the Anglophone world, recovery is also gaining momentum in drug policy and practice in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands. Since the meaning of recovery is being debated internationally, broadening the assessment of how the recovery framework is applied in policy discourse and how it is implemented in various international contexts is imperative. This com parative policy analysis aims to assess similarities and differences in addiction recovery vision, imple mentation, and evaluation in Flanders and the Netherlands. The thematic analysis draws upon a triangulation of different data collection methods: a focus group (n ¼ 14) and interviews (n ¼ 21) with key figures in the addictions field, followed by analyses of relevant policy documents (n ¼ 9). Our find ings show that a holistic vision of addiction recovery is endorsed in both countries. Although differen ces in policy development occurred (i.e. centrally driven in Flanders versus ‘bottom-up’ in the Netherlands), similar challenges emerged concerning recovery-oriented addiction policies. While policy makers in Flanders and the addiction sector in the Netherlands strongly proclaim recovery, structural implementation, dedicated funding, and systematic evaluation of recovery-oriented policies are lacking. This study suggests that systematic inclusion of experts by experience and aligning government and practice level funding and policies are crucial.
    • Children and the doctrine of substituted judgement.

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby; The University of Derby, UK (Sage, 2014-12-01)
      The common law in the United Kingdom dictates that children facing medical treatment should be treated in accordance with their best interests. The Children Act 1989 also demands that the welfare of the child is paramount. However, in light of the creation of saviour siblings after the case of Quintavalle, it is disputed that the donor child is treated in accordance with his/her best interests when undergoing a non-therapeutic procedure for the benefit of another. The Human Tissue Authority (HTA) can, for example, validate a bone marrow harvest on a child created specifically for harvest without the consent of the High Court. The doctrine of substituted judgement was developed in the United States to substitute a previously competent adult decision, but it is proposed that parents of saviour siblings are reviving it in a modified form to install a speculative psychological benefit into the saviour child to satisfy the criteria for a harvest in common law. As a result, there is a glaring discrepancy between the objective jurisdiction of the courts and the validation of non-therapeutic harvesting procedures upon children by the HTA, opening the door to potential legal action.
    • Chinese companies and the Hong Kong stock market

      Huang, Flora; Yeung, Horace; University of Leicester (Routledge, 2013-10-04)
      Listing by companies from one country on the stock market of another country is a device often used both to raise capital in, and to increase bonding with, the target country. This book examines the listing by Chinese companies on the Hong Kong stock market. It discusses the extent of the phenomenon, compares the two different regulatory regimes, and explores the motivations for the cross-listing. It argues that a key factor, in addition to raising capital and bonding with the Hong Kong market, is Chinese companies’ desire to encourage legal and regulatory reforms along Hong Kong lines in mainland China, in order to develop and open up China’s domestic capital markets.
    • Christian-Muslim and Muslim-Christian dialogue initiatives, movements and organisation

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-14)
      Since the emergence of Islam as a religion with global presence, dialogue between Christians and Muslims can be found in the common history of the relationships between these religions along, of course, with other modalities ranging from tolerance and parallelism through to pressure and violence. The focus of this chapter is not so much on the more general shape of Christian–Muslim relations as found in and between the historical societies informed by these religious traditions or on the theologically interpretive or sociologically descriptive and analytical aspects of these relations which other chapters in this book discuss. Rather, it highlights contemporary examples of specific collective forms for this relationship as manifested particularly in terms of ‘intentional’ movements, organisations and initiatives as both constituted by and concerned with dialogue between Christians and Muslims. Reference is also made to some initiatives, organisations and movements that encompass Christian–Muslim dialogue within a broader set of relationships – and especially those that involve Muslims, Christians and Jews. Space constraints dictate that what is described and discussed is necessarily selective but hopefully be illustrative in grounding the chapter’s analysis and evaluative discussion in examples from across a number of contexts.
    • City rhythms and events.

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-01-04)
    • Civil law consequences of corruption and bribery in France.

      Jaluzot, Beatrice; Meiselles, Michala; Université Jean Moulin (Lyon 3) (Nomos, 2009)
    • The clash of civilisations thesis and religious responses

      Weller, Paul; University of Derby (Fatih University, 2010-12-25)
      The article describes key aspects of Samuel Huntington’s “Clash of Civilizations” thesis. It acknowledges the way in which that thesis has picked up on some key changes in relation to the role of religion in public life and, especially, in international relations. But it also critiques the thesis for its “essentializing” and “bloc” approach to cultures and societies, arguing that such an approach does not take sufficient account of the differences and sometimes fault-lines and conflicts within societies and cultural groups. For what might characterise appropriate religiously informed responses to Huntington’s thesis, the article proposes an approach based on four “keynotes” of “modesty”, “integrity”, “realism” and “distinctiveness”.
    • Class politics and the revenge of the future.

      Burton-Cartledge, Phil; University of Derby (Lawrence and Wishart, 2017-09)