• The complexity of decision-making processes and IoT adoption in accommodation SMEs

      Pappas, Nikolaos; Caputo, Andrea; Pellegrini, Massimiliano Matteo; Marzi, Giacomo; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Sunderland; University of Trento, Italy; University of Lincoln; University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Italy; University of Lincoln; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-01-18)
      The current competitive scenario is fast-moving toward an integration of sophisticated technological innovations, i.e. smart solutions for hospitality, in particular the accommodation industry. Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are able to connect and let communicate different devices to craft a personalized customer experience. Given the undeniable impact for the hospitality sector, the decisions about adopting smart solutions are not always linear: benefits and limitations co-exist and need to be weighed against each other. By adopting fsQCA, this paper compares several decision-making factors that may influence the willingness to adopt IoT, surveying owners/managers in the Greek accommodation industry. Results show four types of decision-making: (i) rational, a weighted evaluation of risks and opportunities; (ii) enthusiast, mostly highlighting benefits to gain a competitive advantage; (iii) cautious, emphasizing risks and barriers to innovate; and (iv) futurist, a consideration of future technological necessities related to the increasing digitalization.
    • The future of accountancy – beyond the numbers.

      Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-06-01)
      The pace of change continues to increase through rapid developments in technology which are likely to transform ways of working in the accounting profession. Whilst some of this change is likely to be evolutionary rather than revolutionary, much of the mundane ‘number-crunching’ and data processing currently undertaken by accountants will be automated over the next few years. This should not be regarded as a threat, but more of an opportunity to embrace the softer skills and more value-added work such as consultancy; advising clients and businesses on how to derive more value from their business models. This will require a change of skillset and an appreciation of the wider issues impacting business ‘beyond the numbers’.
    • Mobilising the dome

      Azara, Iride; Wakefield, Lisa; University of Derby (2016-09)
      More and more public and private tourism organisations are putting an emphasis on the creation of ‘memorable tourist experiences’ (Bærenholdt and Michael Haldrup, 2004; O’Dell, 2007 and Ennen and Van Maanen, 2013). It is now commonly accepted that technology plays a vital role in communication and interpretation and altogether in achieving this outcome, supporting tourism growth and instigating innovative responses to competition for tourist attraction (Neuhofer, Buhalis and Ladkin, 2012). This paper discusses how technology can be used to mobilise and reconceptualise a contested heritage space, focusing on an ongoing research project aimed at developing audio tours at the Devonshire Dome: a Grade II* listed building and iconic tourism landmark that dominates the Buxton 44 townscape (Sheller and Urry, 2006 and Haldrup and Larsen, 2006). Aimed at first-time visitor to Buxton, the exploration of the Dome encourages visitors to use the building under the terms and conditions of the Heritage Lottery Funds received in 2000. The terms of the HLF grant were that the building be made available to visitors and the community in perpetuity. The audio tours takes the visitors on a journey through time showcasing the building from a grand stable block; to a well-respected ‘hydropathic’ hospital before being given a new lease of life as a University campus. Preliminary findings, collected through a series of qualitative research interventions with visitors to the Dome and University stakeholders highlight the potential technology has to enable three competing heritage narratives of place to coexist simultaneously thus developing and reconfiguring people’s relationship with the place and the range of stakeholders involved in the delivery of the tourism product. The research contributes to the existing body of knowledge that aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of how technology can be used at heritage sites as both a key driver of change in helping to create and develop memorable experiences, redrafting visitor’s relationship with space and maximising effectiveness.
    • Technology challenges in accounting and finance.

      Crookes, Elizabeth; Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-06-01)
      Since human history began, new ways of working or inventions have emerged which have fundamentally changed the accepted methods of living and/or doing business. Whether this was the wheel or the printing press, the ‘technology of the day’ has disrupted accepted practice, and usually required learning new skills or approaches. In the modern era, much of this disruption has occurred through information technology, such as the internet. This chapter presents four technologies of varying degrees of maturity which are likely to change the accounting profession: Big Data, Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain. We explain what each technology is and how it might impact the business world and how accountants need to potentially change their skillsets to address the challenges these disruptive technologies bring.
    • Technology Platforms and Challenges

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (Channel View Publications, 2010-12)