• Congestion prediction for smart sustainable cities using IoT and machine learning approaches

      Majumdar, Sharmila; Subhani, Moeez M.; Roullier, Benjamin; Anjum, Ashiq; Zhu, Rongbo; University of Derby; University of Leicester; South Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan, China (Elsevier BV, 2020-09-25)
      Congestion on road networks has a negative impact on sustainability in many cities through the exacerbation of air pollution. Smart congestion management allows road users to avoid congested areas, decreasing pollutant concentration. Accurately predicting congestion propagation is difficult however, due to the dynamic non-linear behavior of traffic flow. With the rise of Internet of Things devices, there are now data sets available that can be used to provide smart, sustainable transport solutions within cities. In this work, we introduce long short-term memory networks for the prediction of congestion propagation across a road network. Based on vehicle speed data from traffic sensors at two sites, our model predicts the propagation of congestion across a 5-min period within a busy town. Analysis of both univariate and multivariate predictive models show an accuracy of 84–95% depending on the road layout. This accuracy shows that long short-term memory networks are suitable for predicting congestion propagation on road networks and may form a key component of future traffic modelling approaches for smart and sustainable cities around the world.
    • Corporate social responsibility at LUX* resorts and hotels: Satisfaction and loyalty implications for employee and customer social responsibility

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Coventry (MDPI AG, 2020-11-22)
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) remains a hot topic in management. Yet, little is known about how well managers, employees and consumers are responding to CSR initiatives to align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Underpinned by well-established theories, this study develops a single integrative model of managers’, employees’ and consumers’ CSR. Data were collected from the LUX* group of resorts and hotels located on three Indian Ocean islands: Mauritius, Reunion and the Maldives. Structural equation modelling was employed. Findings reveal: (1) organizational CSR is positively related to employee social responsibility; (2) organizational CSR is negatively associated with customer social responsibility; (3) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer social responsibility; (4) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer delight; (5) customer social responsibility is positively related to customer satisfaction; and (6); customer social responsibility is positively related to customer delight. Strategic CSR initiatives with a multi-stakeholder engagement approach are discussed. Keywords: corporate social responsibility; stakeholder engagement; employee; customer satisfaction; loyalty
    • The descent of nations: social evolutionary theory, modernism and ethno‐symbolism

      Kerr, William; University of Edinburgh (Wiley, 2019-01-30)
      This article explores the use of a revised conception of social evolutionary theory towards an understanding of nationalism. First, I review the debate between ethno‐symbolism and modernism, through the lens of the Warwick Debate between Gellner and Smith, arguing that both are partly right. Secondly, I outline what the revised conception of social evolution is looking first at its traditional conception before outlining a Darwinian view of social evolutionary theory. Finally, I examine how Darwinian social evolutionary theory can help fruitfully bring the ethno‐symbolic and modernist perspectives together. This is done by a sustained engagement primarily with the theories of Anthony Smith and Ernest Gellner pointing to how Darwinian social evolutionary theory can provide a link between the two theories that makes them mutually supportive rather than opposed.
    • Social Bonding and Public Trust/Distrust in COVID-19 Vaccines

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, College of Business, Law, & Social Sciences, Derby Business School; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (MDPI AG, 2021-09-14)
      COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has been a growing concern. The pandemic has proved to be very complicated with the mutated virus. The Delta variant is contributing to a surge of cases across the globe. Vaccine hesitancy can be socially contagious, requiring more stringent efforts from policy makers and health professionals in promoting vaccine uptake. Some evidence shows that vaccine acceptance appears to have played an integral role in successfully controlling the pandemic. Vaccination acceptance, however, demands that the public has a good understanding of the vaccine’s benefits in promoting healthier societies and people’s quality of life. Unclear COVID-19 vaccine information can lead to distrust in vaccines and vaccine hesitancy. It is of paramount importance to communicate clear and unbiased vaccine information to the public to encourage vaccine uptake. Word of mouth communication remains important to further promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake in the community. This short paper discusses the role of social bonds and public trust/distrust and word of mouth communication in vaccine decision making.