• Adoption of blockchain technology in supply chain transparency: Australian manufacturer case study

      Maroun, Elias A.; Daniel, Jay; Fynes, Brian; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (European Decision Sciences Institute (EDSI), 2019-06)
      The arrival and capabilities of Blockchain is set to change traditional supply chain activities. Consumers are increasingly demanding details about the products they purchase, the sources of the manufactured product and manufacturing details. Organisations are declaring that they strive to improve labour practices and minimise the environmental effect of manufacturing goods however consumers still have a limited view of supply chains. The increasing development of the digital economy, the internet of things (IOT) and the growing use of sensors providing information in supply chains is providing Blockchain leverage to streamline and create an efficient supply chain track and trace of all types of transactions more transparently and securely. This paper explores the adoption of Blockchain technology in supply chain transparency. Specifically, we examine whether Blockchain technology is a good fit for use in an Australian manufacturer supply chain. Blockchain allows us to have permissioned or permission-less distributed ledgers where stakeholders can interact with each other. We describe in detail how Blockchain works and the mechanism of hash algorithms, which allows for greater security of information. Using a single case study, we focus on the intricacies of this technology and present a summary of adoption for Blockchain technology. The adoption for using Blockchain technology has the potential to bring greater transparency, validity across the supply chain, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders involved.
    • Blockchain in supply chain management: Australian manufacturer case study

      Abou Maroun, Elias; Daniel, Jay; Zowghi, Didar; Talaei-Khoei, Amir; University of Technology Sydney; University of Derby; University of Nevada (ASSRI and Springer, 2019-10-06)
      The recent explosion of interest around Blockchain and capabilities of this technology to track all types of transaction more transparently and securely motivate us to explore the possibilities Blockchain offers across the supply chain. This paper examines whether Blockchain makes a good fit for use in an Australian manufacturer supply chain. To address this, the research uses Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a framework from the literature. Blockchain allows us to have permissioned or permission-less distributed ledgers where stakeholders can interact with each other. It details how Blockchain works and the mechanism of hash algorithms which allows for greater security of information. It also focuses on the supply chain management and looks at the intricacies of a manufacturers supply chain. We present a review of the processes in place of an electrical manufacturer and the problems faced in the supply chain. A model is proposed in using public and private Blockchains to overcome these issues. The proposed solution has the potential to bring greater transparency, validity across the supply chain, and improvement of communication between stakeholders involved. We also point out some potential issues that should be considered if adopting Blockchain.
    • A case study for merging supply chain and blockchain in Australian manufacturer

      Daniel, Jay; Maroun, E; Fynes, B; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (POMS, 2021)
      This paper examines implementation of Blockchain technology within an Australian manufacturer supply chain. We present a summary of the challenges in adopting this technology. The adoption of Blockchain technology has potential to bring greater transparency, validity across supply chain processes, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders and customers involved.
    • Opportunities for use of blockchain technology in supply chains: Australian manufacturer case study

      Maroun, E.A; Daniel, Jay; University of Technology Sydney; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-03)
      The arrival and capabilities of Blockchain is set to change the traditional supply chain activities. The tracking all types of transaction more transparently and securely using Blockchain motivate us to explore the opportunities Blockchain offers across the supply chain. This paper explores opportunities for use of Blockchain technology in supply chains. Particularly, examine whether Blockchain technology makes a good fit for use in an Australian manufacturer supply chain. Blockchain allows us to have permissioned or permission-less distributed ledgers where stakeholders can interact with each other. It details how Blockchain works and the mechanism of hash algorithms which allows for greater security of information. Case study focuses on the supply chain management and looks at the intricacies of an Australian manufacturers supply chain. We present a summary of opportunities for using Blockchain technology in supply chains in an Australian manufacturing case study. The summary is proposed in using private Blockchain in the case study. The opportunities using Blockchain technology has the potential to bring greater transparency, validity across the supply chain, and improvement of communication between stakeholders involved.
    • Technology challenges in accounting and finance.

      Crookes, Elizabeth; Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Springer, 2018-06-01)
    • Technology challenges in accounting and finance.

      Crookes, Elizabeth; Conway, Elaine; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-06-01)
      Since human history began, new ways of working or inventions have emerged which have fundamentally changed the accepted methods of living and/or doing business. Whether this was the wheel or the printing press, the ‘technology of the day’ has disrupted accepted practice, and usually required learning new skills or approaches. In the modern era, much of this disruption has occurred through information technology, such as the internet. This chapter presents four technologies of varying degrees of maturity which are likely to change the accounting profession: Big Data, Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain. We explain what each technology is and how it might impact the business world and how accountants need to potentially change their skillsets to address the challenges these disruptive technologies bring.