• Antecedents and outcomes of resident empowerment through tourism

      Aleshinloye, Kayode; Woosnam, Kyle; Tasci, Asli; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Central Florida; University of Georiga, Athens, Greece; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-02-17)
      Even though empowerment is a frequently mentioned keyword in resident attitude studies, the relationship network of this concept is rather vague. It is critical to understand the factors that influence empowerment, and factors that empowerment influences in return. Therefore, the current study modeled residents’ data from the top tourism destination in the U.S.—Orlando, Florida. Data from 415 residents were analyzed using Partial Least Squares - Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) on SmartPLS to test the effects of residents’ involvement and economic benefits from tourism on their psychological, social and political empowerment, and thus quality of life and ultimately, place attachment. Findings revealed that psychological empowerment is the most significant dimension of resident empowerment influencing both place dependence and place identity, suggesting that residents hold special values for their place. Managerial and theoretical implications, along with limitations (in light of the project occurring pre-COVID-19) and future research opportunities are discussed. Keywords: Resident attitudes, empowerment, place attachment, quality of life, PLS
    • Application of machine learning to predict visitors’ green behaviours in marine protected areas: evidence from Cyprus

      Rezapouraghdam, Hamed; Akshiq, Arash; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Cyprus University, Lefkosa, Turkey; Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, Krakow, Poland; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Taylor & Francis, 2021-03-10)
      Interpretive marine turtle tours in Cyprus yields an alluring ground to unfold the complex nature of pro-environmental behavior among travelers in nature-based destinations. Framing on Collins (2004) interaction ritual concept and the complexity theory, the current study proposes a configurational model and probes the interactional effect of visitors’ memorable experiences with environmental passion and their demographics to identify the causal recipes leading to travelers’ sustainable behaviors. Data was collected from tourists in the marine protected areas located in Cyprus. Such destinations are highly valuable not only for their function as an economic source for locals but also as a significant habitat for biodiversity preservation. Using fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA), this empirical study revealed that three recipes predict the high score level of visitors’ environmentally friendly behavior. Additionally, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) method was applied to train and test the patterns of visitors’ pro-environmental behavior in a machine learning environment to come up with a model which can best predict the outcome variable. The unprecedented implications on the use of technology to simulate and encourage pro-environmental behaviors in sensitive protected areas are discussed accordingly.
    • Augmented reality application for visitor experiences in nature based tourism

      Azizul, Hassan; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (CABI, 2021-03)
      There is evidence that the application of Augmented Reality (AR) supports posi-tive visitor experience. As an innovative technology, AR superimposes computer gen-erated imagery on the real world view and continues to attract the attention of re-searchers and practitioners. It is yet underexplored in the nature tourism context, call-ing for more research in the field. The aim of this chapter is to outline the impacts of AR in nature-based tourism. We use the Sundarbans in Bangladesh as a case to il-lustrate the application of AR in a nature-based setting. Data and information were generated both from the relevant literature and in-depth interviews. The respondents were general visitors, tourism service providers and government officials. Respond-ents were selected by purposive sampling and the interviews were audio-recorded and then self-transcribed. A number of tourism service providers were assertive in capitalising the existing lacks in the Sundarbans in terms of business development. The government officials appeared having concerns about diverse issues but were positive in the application of an innovative technology. This study concludes that the application of AR can possibly generate competitive advantages in a nature-based tourism context. AR is proposed as a tool to assist with sustainability initiatives to pro-tect the Sundarban’s resources and provide optimum visitor satisfaction.
    • Beauty and elegance: value co-creation in cosmetic surgery tourism

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (SAGE Publications, 2020-06-16)
      This study presents an emerging trend in medical tourism, cosmetic surgery tourism (CST). We explore tourists’ perceptions of CST for medical service quality as an antecedent to tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit, which is underexplored in CST. This study examines the mediating role of value co-creation in influencing behaviors of CST-seeking tourists to experience a better quality of life. Using a sample drawn from 279 tourists, comprised of Australian, Japanese, and Chinese nationalities at two international airports in China, findings show that perceived medical service quality positively influences tourists’ emotional attachment, trust, and intentions to visit directly and through the mediating role of value co-creation across the three nationalities. CST-seeking tourists’ inputs in value co-creation may positively influence their behaviors, which are vital antecedents to promoting CST business. Implications for future research are discussed.
    • Bringing cross-disciplinarity to the fore: a methodological framework for leadership in destination management organisations

      Hristov, Dean; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018-07-27)
      Grounded in three core paradigms from the mainstream organizational literature _ namely destination management organizations (DMOs) and destinations; leadership and distributed leadership (DL); and network theory and SNA _ this chapter puts forward and discusses a cross-disciplinary, three-phase methodological framework for the study of the enactment and practice of DL in contemporary DMOs.
    • A content analysis for government’s and hotels’ response to COVID-19 pandemic in Egypt

      Islam, Salem; Elshwesky, Zakaria; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Technology and Applied Sciences, Salalah, Oman; Alexandria University, Egypt; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-04-13)
      Drawing on the Situational Crisis Communication theory (SCCT), this study recapitulates the initiatives, practices, and responses of the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels during the COVID-19 global health pandemic. Subjective and objective content analysis is employed in this study. Subjective content analysis is employed to examine newspapers, magazines, T.V channels, and official pages on Facebook to determine the initiatives and practices adopted by the Egyptian government. Objective content analysis is further used to determine the COVID-19 hospitality practices adopted by 22 chain-managed five-star hotels by examining their official websites. Thematic saturation was attained when observations and analyses exhibited no new themes. Findings indicated that the Egyptian government and chain-managed five-star hotels implemented a number of initiatives and practices focused on financial policies, health and hygiene, workforce and training, marketing, domestic tourism, booking flexibility, cancellation policies, community support, vacations, and contracts. This study contributes to crisis management research by being one of the first studies to explore governments and hotel operations practices and initiatives during the COVID-19 using Egypt as a case study. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications during and post the COVID-19.
    • Corporate social responsibility at LUX* resorts and hotels: Satisfaction and loyalty implications for employee and customer social responsibility

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Coventry (MDPI AG, 2020-11-22)
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) remains a hot topic in management. Yet, little is known about how well managers, employees and consumers are responding to CSR initiatives to align with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Underpinned by well-established theories, this study develops a single integrative model of managers’, employees’ and consumers’ CSR. Data were collected from the LUX* group of resorts and hotels located on three Indian Ocean islands: Mauritius, Reunion and the Maldives. Structural equation modelling was employed. Findings reveal: (1) organizational CSR is positively related to employee social responsibility; (2) organizational CSR is negatively associated with customer social responsibility; (3) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer social responsibility; (4) employee social responsibility is negatively related to customer delight; (5) customer social responsibility is positively related to customer satisfaction; and (6); customer social responsibility is positively related to customer delight. Strategic CSR initiatives with a multi-stakeholder engagement approach are discussed. Keywords: corporate social responsibility; stakeholder engagement; employee; customer satisfaction; loyalty
    • COVID-19 place confinement, pro-social, pro-environmental behaviors, and residents’ wellbeing: a new conceptual framework

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers, 2020-09-01)
      Residents’ wellbeing in the present COVID-19 global health crisis requires a deeper understanding to determine appropriate management strategies to promote sustainable behaviors and contribute to human and planetary health. Residents’ behavior can have a profound influence in contributing to personal and global community’s health by responding effectively to emergency strategies in disease outbreaks such as the Coronavirus. It is evident that an understanding of residents’ behavior(s) pre COVID-19 across fields have relied on over-simplistic models, many of which will need to be revisited. Our interaction with people and nature while respecting social distancing has profound positive impacts on our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing. The current health pandemic has called that people be confined in their homes across many nations as a means to control the spread of the virus and save lives. This calls for research exploring the mechanisms; this paper develops and proposes a conceptual framework suggesting that place confinement promotes pro-social and household pro-environmental behaviors which could become habitual and contribute further to our people’s and our planet’s health. Some evidence shows that human connectedness to place may contribute to engagement in desirable behaviors. Interaction with other members of the household can help create meanings leading to collective actions promoting psychological wellbeing. Promoting hygienic behaviors in the household (frequent hand washing) while at the same time being conscious not to keep the water flowing when not required would contribute to a range of benefits (health, financial, biospheric, altruistic) and promote wellbeing. Engaging in pro-social behaviors may result in positive effects on psychological wellbeing, reducing mental distress giving rise to a sense of attachment and belongingness, trust and overall life satisfaction. Engaging people in low-effort pro-environmental behavior to maintain some levels of physical activity and biological harmony with natural environmental settings (e.g. gardening) may help reduce anxiety and distress. This is the first study exploring the interplay of relationships between place confinement, pro-social behavior, household pro-environmental behaviors, place attachment as a multi-dimensional construct and presenting their relationships to residents’ wellbeing. Behavioral change interventions are proposed to promote lifestyle change for people’s wellbeing and broader societal benefits.
    • Distributed leadership in DMOs: a review of literature and directions for future research

      Hristov, Dean; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Naumov, Nick; University of Northampton; University of Derby; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Nexford University, Washington DC, USA (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-27)
      Amidst key emergent challenges for Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) and destinations triggered by changes in the funding and governance landscape for tourism on a global scale, Distributed Leadership (DL) has emerged as a promising concept to provide a collaborative framework for channelling resources and leadership to cope with such changes. Current evidence from academic literature discussing the importance of embedding shared forms of leadership is scarce and few studies discuss the application of DL in the context of DMOs. The key purpose of the following conceptual study is to provide a critical overview of key DL contributions in the mainstream and DMO academic literature. The study seeks to examine the relevance of DL in the context DMOs with the purpose to stimulate future empirical investigations in the application of DL in DMO organisations.
    • Employing a value-belief-norm framework to gauge Carthage residents’ intentions to support sustainable cultural heritage tourism

      Megeihi, Huda El; Woosnam, Kyle Maurice; Ribeiro, Manuel Alector; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Denley, Tara Joyce; University of derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-03-16)
      In light of the recent conflicts in Carthage over land use, Cultural heritage preservation, and sustainable tourism, this work utilized a value-belief-norm (VBN) theoretical framework to consider psychological antecedents of residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. As such, personal values, cultural worldview, awareness of consequences, ascription of responsibility, and subjective norms were considered antecedents of intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. Data were collected from 475 Carthage residents in nine neighborhoods adjacent to UNESCO World Heritage Sites using an on-site self-administered questionnaire. The proposed model was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (to demonstrate sound psychometric properties across all 11 factors within the model), followed by structural equation modelling. Overall, 15 of the 19 proposed hypotheses were supported, ultimately contributing to 28% of the variance explained in residents’ behavioral intentions to support Cultural heritage tourism. This work not only provides support for the utilization of the VBN model within the context of cultural heritage tourism, it also deepens our understanding of the theoretical framework through the inclusion of the multi-dimensional construct cultural worldview.
    • Environmentally and financially sustainable tourism

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; Monash University; Curtin University ((ICHRIE Research Reports) Richmond VA USA: International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional EducationICHRIE, 2018-12-20)
    • Health, wellness and place attachment during and post health pandemics

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Majeed, Salman; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Derby, Derby Business School; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China (Frontiers, 2020-11-26)
      Therapeutic landscapes encapsulate healing and recovery notions in natural and built environmental settings. Tourists’ perceptions determine their decision making of health and wellness tourism consumption. Researchers struggle with the conceptualization of the term ‘therapeutic landscapes’ across disciplines. Drawing on extant literature searched in nine databases, this scoping review identifies different dimensions of therapeutic landscapes. Out of identified 178 literature sources, 124 met the inclusion criteria of identified keywords. We review the contribution and the potential of environmental psychology in understanding tourist behavior to promote health and wellness tourism destinations in a post COVID-19 context. We develop and propose conceptual framework comprising: (1) perceived goodness of therapeutic landscapes, (2) health and wellness consumption, (3) COVID-19 pandemic perceived health and wellness risk, (4) place attachment (5) re-visitation. We propose measurement scales, discuss implications and major issues in the immediate and post the COVID-19 pandemic to inform future research.
    • Hospitality consumers’ decision-making

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      With growing insights and the call for more sustainable practices to contribute to the protection of the environment, consumers of tourism and hospitality are becoming more ecologically conscious, demanding more sustainable products. This chapter provides a review of the behavioral models most relevant to choice of hospitality products and services. It contributes to the existing repertoire of knowledge through an exploration of information processing, personal efficacy, innovation and image as important factors influencing hospitality consumers’ decision-making, and presents a range of theoretical and practical implications. It is expected to assist hospitality providers to understand consumers’ decision-making when choosing sustainable hospitality products and services. This will allow practitioners to make informed decisions regarding the provision of sustainable and innovative hospitality products and services sought by the target audience.
    • Hospitality consumers’ information search behavior reinforcement and displacement of traditional media

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      Researchers and hospitality providers show a growing interest in understanding how consumers look for various products and services provided by the hospitality industry. With consumers using different media technologies, hospitality providers are now accelerating the flow of information across different channels of communication. This chapter seeks to explore significant gaps in research on the role of online media referred to as the “new media” on hospitality consumers’ information search behavior. This chapter contributes to the theoretical advancement of knowledge by examining the significance of current trends in hospitality consumers’ information search behavior through the lens of convergence culture.
    • Impact of sustainability practices on hospitality consumers’ behaviors and attitudes: The case of LUX* resorts & hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Movondo, Felix; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      The growing volume of research on customers’ attitudes towards sustainability practices in the hospitality sector has attracted significant interest from researchers and managers in the past decade. This chapter investigates the relationship between sustainability practices in hotels and its influence on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors, and the brand. Using LUX* Resorts & Hotels as a case study, this chapter provides insights into the growing importance of sustainability practices among resorts and hotels. It shows how consumers play an important role in shifting a business strategy towards a more sustainable course. This chapter will be of value to practitioners in helping them align their strategies with customers’ expectations. It contributes to the pool of studies on sustainability in hotels and resorts, which will assist researchers in furthering research and reflection in this area.
    • Industrialization of nature in the time of complexity unawareness, the case of Chitgar lake, Iran

      Akshik, Arash; Rezapour, Hamed; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Eastern Mediterranean University; Bahcesehir Cyprus University; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-10-16)
      To find answers to the challenges linked with ecological well-being, policymakers and authorities now prefer the ecosystem-based approach, as the solutions inspired by nature may deflect from ecological collapse. Hereupon, nature-based solutions (NBS) are rhapsodized both in practice and academia, as a means to achieve sustainable development. However, NBS, which inherently is supposed to bring forth positive outcomes, may also lead to unsustainable turmoil. On the other hand, the majority of the studies about NBS are from Western countries and studies focusing on the paradoxical functionality of NBS are scant, especially in the Middle East. In an attempt to bridge this gap, the current study uses one of the largest blue man-made infrastructures in the Middle East as a case. Following the phenomenological interpretive approach, the authors argue that NBS may fabricate unintended problems when the complexity of the supra systems are overlooked. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed.
    • Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Migrant workers’ rights, social justice and sustainability in Australian and New Zealand wineries: a comparative context

      Baird, Tim; Hall, C. Michael; Castka, Pavel; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ; Curtin University, Perth, Australia (Palgrave Macmillan/ Springer Nature, 2019-11-23)
      This chapter focuses on sustainable practices from the perspective of current social sustainability issues involving the rights of migrant workers within the New Zealand wine industry. A comparative context from the Australian wine industry is also provided using the cool climate winegrowing areas of Western Australia and Tasmania. Migrant workers’ rights and social justice were two areas which featured in the 2015 and 2016 National Wineries Survey that was conducted across all three of these regions and was designed to examine wine producers’ perceptions towards sustainability and wine tourism. This study found that in terms of the social aspects of sustainability and the treatment of migrant workers that very different opinions existed between Australian and New Zealand wineries. Wineries in both Tasmania and Western Australia saw social sustainability as impacting on their business practices, while their New Zealand counterparts were seemingly somewhat ambivalent towards this issue.
    • Online tourism information and tourist behavior: a structural equation modeling analysis based on a self-administered survey

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Lu, Changbao; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, China; University of Derby; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers in Psychology, 2020-04-21)
      This study presents the interacting phenomena of perceptions of tourist destination online content (TDOC) and tourists’ behavioral intentions with a mediating role of tourists’ satisfaction, which is as yet under-explored in hospitality and tourism research. A model based on three main constructs, namely TDOC (with sub-constructs of online information quality and user-friendly accessibility), satisfaction, and tourists’ behavioral intentions [with sub-constructs of intentions to visit a tourist destination and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)], is presented to determine the growth of tourism business with the internet. Data were collected via a questionnaire-based survey from 413 tourists staying at hotels in Lahore city in Pakistan. Partial least square structural equation modeling was used to statistically analyze the gathered data. The findings indicate that tourists’ perceptions of TDOC directly influence their behavioral intentions, while tourists’ satisfaction exerts a mediating influence between tourists’ perceptions of TDOC and their behavioral intentions. Taking advantage of an economical and widespread online environment, destination marketing organizations could attract more tourists by fostering confidence in TDOC and positive eWOM to remain competitive in the long run. Important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.