• Combined degrees & employability: A comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities

      Pigden, Louise; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (West East Institute, 2016-05)
      Over the last decade, there has been an increase in the popularity and number of combined or joint degrees in English and Welsh Universities. Combined or joint honours represent 10% of all undergraduates - 50,000 out of 500,0001 currently enrolled on all honours degrees. This significant and special way of learning therefore warrants scrutiny. Combined degrees enable students to enroll on two or more subjects, with varying levels of integration of the courses, which leads to either a BA or BSc honours joint award. The growing number of students on such degrees across universities in England and Wales has led to a debate as to the intrinsic value of such degrees especially in relation to graduate employability and career opportunities. This paper examines the nature and relative attractiveness of combined degrees and explores the employability of combined honours degree graduates in comparison with single honours degree graduates.
    • Combined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities.

      Pigden, Louise; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (West East Institute, 2016-08)
      Over the last decade, there has been an increase in the popularity and number of combined or joint degrees in English and Welsh Universities. Combined or joint honours represent 10% of all undergraduates. 50,000 out of 500,000 currently enrolled on all honours degrees. This significant and special way of learning therefore warrants scrutiny. Combined degrees enable students to enroll on two or more subjects, with varying levels of integration of the courses, which leads to either a BA or BSc honours joint award. The growing number of students on such degrees across universities in England and Wales has led to a debate as to the intrinsic value of such degrees especially in relation to graduate employability and career opportunities. This paper examines the nature and relative attractiveness of combined degrees and explores the employability of combined honours degree graduates in comparison with single honours degree graduates.
    • Diplomacy and the politics of fear: the 21st century challenges to the theory and practice of Diplomacy and International Relations

      Jegede, Francis; Todd, Malcolm; Stubbs, John; Hodgson, Philip; Univeristy of Derby (LHSS, University of Derby, 2016-09-12)
      Conflicts, political unrest, mass migration and the rise of violent extremism by non-state actors are features that have characterized the early 21st century. A huge challenge to world peace and security is posed by volatile economic and political conditions around the world. This situation has led to a growing tension in many inter-state relations which arguably has underpinned the rise of groups such as Al Qaeda and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Middle East, the Boko Haram in West Africa, and Al Shabaab in East Africa. Arguably, there is a growing sense of fear and unease in every sphere of social, economic and political life. More than at any other time in human history, the future seems uncertain. Relationships and trusts between states and their citizens are breaking down; relations, mutual cooperation and connections between states are under strain; there is growing sense of disillusionment by the governed of the ability of governments and mainstream political establishments to address their concerns and meet their needs. The feeling of uncertainty and general fear for the future is real. While these may not necessarily be universally held views, there is a growing indication that people and communities around the world are feeling dissatisfied and may be threatened by mainstream political systems. Just when it is most needed, diplomacy and diplomatic practice seem to be taking the back seat in the face of growing conflicts. This conference examines the socio-economic and political environment that creates social and political discontent, political apathy, the weakening of inter-state relations, and the general sense of fear.
    • Do We Need a New Legal Framework for Fighting Non-Conventional Wars? The International Law of War, Human Rights and the Global Fight Against Extremism and Terrorism

      Jegede, Francis; Todd, Malcolm; University of Derby (Global Science and Technology Forum, 2016-11-16)
      This paper examines the existing legal framework for fighting violent extremism and terrorism. Highlighting the inherent limitations of the current International Law of War in dealing with the growing challenges posed by terrorists and violent extremist groups, the paper discusses the problem facing military commanders, security agents, state actors and the international community in confronting extremist groups while upholding human rights values and respecting the law of war. The paper poses the question as to whether the current legal framework for dealing with extremist groups is sufficient without contravening the essential provisions and ethos of the International Law of War and Human Rights. Using examples, the paper examines how extremist groups flagrantly disregard the rule of law and disrespect human rights in their campaign of terror. The paper also notes instances in which the current Western strategy in fighting terrorism may be viewed or considered as conflicting with human rights and international law.
    • Economic interdependence in a globalised world - the effects of Greece's financial crises on Derbyshire businesses

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Derby Telegraph, 2013)
      Greece, in recent years, has suffered series of financial crises that necessitated massive European bailouts to support and sustain the country's economy. The bailouts and support from the IMF and the European Central Bank came with stringent economic conditions that have caused severe political turmoil in the country. This article, published by Derby Telegraph, examines the nature and effect of economic interdependency in a globalised world. Using, the recent financial crises as case study; the article explains how the economic woes in countries like Greece and Portugal could hit Derbyshire businesses.
    • Elderly persons' mobility situation and use of public transport in England and Wales. A logistic regression analysis.

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Population Association of America, 1995-04)
      This paper examines the mobility situation of elderly people in England and Wales. The paper analyses elderly peoples' use of public transport for local movements and the degree to which each transport mode is considered "convenient" for that purpose. Using a logistic regression procedure as conceptualized in a dichotomous situation, the paper examines how elderly people's socio-medical conditions or disability could affect their "convenient" use of transport. The paper, based on a survey conducted in 1993, shows that the degree of mobility "deprivation" among elderly people depends on the type and severity of their physical/medical conditions. The study specifically reveals that mobility problems are significant among elderly people that have locomotion disability, and cardiovascular and arthritis conditions. The paper offers some practical suggestions on how the main-stream transport facilities could be improved to make them more accessible to elderly people.
    • Empowering women for positive action in an era of social injustice and gender inequality.

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2018-11-22)
      Empowering women for positive action in an era of social injustice and gender inequality
    • The integration of rail and air transport in Britain

      Stubbs, John; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Elsevier Ltd., 1998-03)
      This paper examines the state of intermodal rail-air transport in mainland Britain. Working on the basis that the relief of the ever increasing road congestion around airports necessitates a modal shift from road to rail transport for both intending air travellers and airport staff, the paper examines the different approaches taken, to date, in providing rail-air links. The paper draws heavily on the proceedings of the 1996 Opportunities for Air and Rail Interaction Conference. The main conclusion drawn in this paper is that the approach to rail-air integration has so far been very piecemeal and lacked the necessary national coordination required to capitalise upon the benefits of rail-air intermodal transport.
    • Political discontent and the 21st Century's threats to global peace, security and human progress

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (College of Law, Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Derby, 2016)
      This paper examines 21st century relations between the State and the communities over which it, nominally at least, has jurisdiction. More specifically the aim of the paper is to explain both why and how so called mainstream politics is failing to engage with many peoples and communities around the world. To this end the paper identifies key areas of conflicts, tensions, mistrusts and other issues in both the domestic and international politics that could compromise the long term stability of nation states and threatens the peace, and security of peoples around the world. Cases are sited of hostile and un-diplomatic relations between states and ill-considered foreign policies that focus on narrow national interests rather than wider societal good. Based on the analysis presented, the paper concludes that the way politics is being played in the 21st century is a principal contributing factor to the current sense of despair and disconnection between the State and the governed. Tentative proposals are advanced towards forming a new politics which addresses the fear and concerns of other states, cultures and peoples as an integral part of any foreign policy and diplomatic relations.
    • The politics of migration in the UK from an artist's perspective - a conversation place No. 6, with a French artist Chris Dugrenier on migration and dance streamed live on May 5, 2015

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Dance4, 2015)
      In this video, Dr Francis Jegede from the University of Derby and a Latin Dance enthusiast, explores the intersection of International Relations, Dance and Politics within the context of current debate and controversies surrounding the issue of migration in the UK. The video was produced by Dance4 under their Conversation Place project. A Conversation Place is a Dance4 project that brings together intriguing and provoking combinations of people who wouldn't normally meet face-to-face to shine a new light on the discourse that surrounds contemporary dance and choreographic practice. Project was set up with the hope that brief glimpses of the lives and ideas of Dance4 guest speakers and friends, shared online, can open up different perspectives on social issues and challenges facing society in Great Britain and beyond. Dance4 is an international centre for the development of extraordinary 21st century dance. A unique voice in the UK dance sector. Their work supports artists and practitioners who are interested in the development of dance as a tool for community development.
    • Population, resources and development

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 1996)
      Award-winning geography text covers the following themes: global wealth distribution, debt and aid; population structure, dynamics and migration; development strategies and population policies; industrialization and employment; and energy resources, commodities and trade. National Book Award - this book won the Geographical Association’s Silver Award - 1996.
    • Population, resources and development / 2nd. Ed.

      Chrispin, Jane; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Collins Educational, 2000)
      A completely revised edition of this popular A level text.This book covers: 1. Growth, wealth and happiness 2. Colonialism, dependency and aid 3. Population dynamics and structure 4. Population movements and urbanisation 5. Population policies and food supply 6. Human resources and industrialisation 7. Natural resources and development 8. World trade, commodities and communications 9. Regional development policies 10. Tourism as a development strategy 11. Alternative strategies for development
    • State vs non-state armed groups - a political economy of violence

      Jegede, Francis; Bampton, Kevin; Todd, Malcolm; University of Derby (Global Science and Technology Forum (GSTF 2015), 2015)
      The early 21st century has witnessed the rise in violent extremism with groups such as Al Qaeda and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Middle East, the Boko Haram in West Africa, and Al Shabaab in East Africa. The activities of these and other non-state armed groups have created a general state of panic and fear that is spreading beyond their areas of operation to other parts of the political world. Rather than diminishing the influence of these groups, the states' counter extremism strategies seem to be further fuelling the extremism and creating new waves of violence that threatens global security and undermines the very essence of our collective wellbeing. This paper examines the socio-economic and political environment in which these armed groups have thrived and poses the question as to whether the failure of politics and development are to blame for the rise of extremism. The paper proposes a new approach to combating extremism that involves re-connecting people with politics and development. The basic contention of this paper is that there has been a failure of the state to satisfy the wellbeing of its citizens. The paper provides an explanation of, but by no means a justification of, the use of violent extremism in the early 21st century.
    • Towards a Deeper Understanding of 21st Century Global Terrorism

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, 2016)
      This paper examines essential issues relating to the rise and nature of violent extremism involving non-state actors and groups in the early 21st century. The global trends in terrorism and violent extremism are examined in relation to Western governments' counter terror operations. The paper analyses the existing legal framework for fighting violent extremism and terrorism and highlights the inherent limitations of the current International Law of War in dealing with the growing challenges posed by terrorists and violent extremist groups. The paper discusses how terrorist groups use civilians, women and children as tools and weapon of war to fuel their campaign of terror and suggests ways in which the international community could deal with the challenge of fighting terrorist groups without putting civilians, women and children in harm way. The paper emphasises the need to uphold human rights values and respect for the law of war in our response to global terrorism. The paper poses the question as to whether the current legal framework for dealing with terrorist groups is sufficient without contravening the essential provisions and ethos of the International Law of War and Human Rights. While the paper explains how terrorist groups flagrantly disregard the rule of law and disrespect human rights in their campaign of terror, it also notes instances in which the current Western strategy in fighting terrorism may be viewed or considered as conflicting with human rights and international law.
    • Understanding the educational needs of joint honours degree students in a post Brexit United Kingdom higher education sector.

      Pigden, Louise; Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (GRDS Publishing, 2018-03-24)
      The motivation for this research was to explore the lived experience of joint honours students, for whom there is little in the literature at present. The objective was to critique primary data collected from the students via a self-administered questionnaire. This phenomenological methodology permitted and unfiltered view of the students’ learning experiences to be explored. The research is based on a cross-university student survey, conducted over a period of six months. The online survey, which ran between June 2016 and January 2017, involved self-administered questionnaires designed to collect information on the learning experience of students on joint honours degrees, from four different Universities in England. A key finding of this paper is the need for university administrators to pay particular attention to joint honours degrees in their portfolios in the light of the growing and significant number of students opting to study these degrees and the general tendency amongst universities to focus attention on single honours degrees. Particular areas of concern are highlighted where students on joint honours degrees feel improvements in their educational experience could be made. The future scope of the survey results are discussed inthe context of Britain exiting the European Union and in relation to the growing debate on the intrinsic value of university education and the increasing necessity for university management to recognise the unique nature of joint honours degrees and design policy to meet the needs of students enrolled on joint honours degrees.
    • What can we do to prevent a repeat of Paris in the UK?

      Jegede, Francis; University of Derby (Derby Telegraph, 2015)
      In the wake of the Paris terrorist attack, questions have been asked as to what we can d to prevent a repeat of this attack in the United Kingdom. This article offers some thoughts on this issue. The article recognises the enormity of the challenges facing the world's nations and society at large in the early 21st century as we witness the rise of violent extremism with groups such as Al Qaeda and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in the Middle East, the Boko Haram in West Africa and Al Shabaab in East Africa striking civilian targets indiscriminately and with a frightening degree of impunity. The paper argues for a rethink of our prevent strategies and suggests ways in which we could prevent similar attack in the UK.