• Risk and protective factors of stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation in England and Wales.

      Ganpat, Soenita Minakoemarie; Tseloni, Andromachi; Farrell, Graham; Tilley, Nick; Thompson, Rebecca; Garius, Laura; Nottingham Trent University (2016-06-14)
      Violence has been fallen dramatically over the past decades. However, it is still unclear why there is an overall decline in violence in and outside the UK. The current gap in knowledge impedes violence reduction opportunities not just in the UK but across the world. To better help understand why violence has fallen over time, the current study, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Secondary Data Analysis Initiative Phase 2, examines which individual-level risk and protective factors significantly increase or decrease the risk of stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation in England and Wales. In doing so, special attention is given to the role of routine activies. This study uses rich data stemming from the Crime Survey for England & Wales (CSEW). Findings show that routine activities and lifestyles predict in important ways stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation frequency. The study underlines the importance of comparing predictors of stranger and acquaintance violence as it brings to light similarities and differences in risk and protective factors for stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation. This study also stresses the importance of examining routine activities and lifestyle when examining stranger and acquaintance violence.
    • Trends in violence victimization in the England and Wales.

      Ganpat, Soenita Minakoemarie; Tseloni, Andromachi; Farrell, Graham; Tilley, Nick; Thompson, Rebecca; Garius, Laura; Nottingham Trent University (2016-11)
      According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, violence rates fell by more than half between 1995 and 2013/14. What still remains puzzling, however, is why violent crimes have fallen dramatically since 1995. The current gap in knowledge impedes violence reduction opportunities not just in the UK but across the world. To better help understand why violence has fallen over time, the current study, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Secondary Data Analysis Initiative Phase 2, examines the trends in stranger and acquaintance violence victimization in England and Wales. In doing so, it also considers the trends by gender and age. This study uses rich data stemming from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW). Findings show important differences in the trends of stranger and acquaintance violence during the recent two decades. The study emphasizes the importance of making a distinction between stranger and acquaintance violence when examining violence trends.
    • Violence and the crime drop

      Ganpat, Soenita; Garius, Laura; Andromachi, Tseloni; Tilley, Nick; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; University College London (Sage, 2020-05-15)
      According to the Crime Survey for England and Wales, violence fell dramatically between 1995 and 2013/14. To improve understanding of the fall in violent crime, this study examines long-term crime trends in England and Wales over the past two decades, by scrutinizing the trends between (a) stranger and acquaintance violence (b) severity of violence, (c) age groups, and (d) sexes. It draws on nationally-representative, weighted data from the Crime Survey for England and Wales, and examines prevalence, incidence and crime concentration trends. The overall violence fall was driven by a decline in the victimisation of young individuals and/or males, perpetrated by acquaintances since 1995. Stranger and acquaintance violence followed different trajectories, with the former beginning to drop post 2003/04. Falls in both stranger and acquaintance violence incidence rates were led by fewer victims over time. Counting all incidents reported by the same victim (instead of capping at five incidents) significantly affects trends in stranger violence but not in acquaintance violence In relation to the distributive justice within the crime drop, this study provides unique evidence of equitable falls in acquaintance violence but inequitable falls in stranger violence. These findings highlight the need to examine violence types separately and point to a number of areas for future research.