Recent Submissions

  • Crisis Management and Recovery for Events: Impacts and Strategies

    Ziakas, Vassilios; Antchak, Vladimir; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; University of Queensland (Goodfellow Publishers, 2021-04-01)
    Reveals how to effectively manage events in times of crisis, and leveraging events for post-disaster recovery. The volume brings together theoretical and practical insights in order to set up a robust ground for effective crisis management and recovery strategies of events.
  • Understanding the core elements of event portfolio strategy: lessons from Auckland and Dunedin

    Antchak, Vladimir; Michael, Luck; Tomas, Pernecky; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand (Emerald, 2021-05-17)
    An event portfolio is a vital part of economic and socio-cultural processes designed around the use of public events in cities and destinations around the world. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a new research framework for comparative studies of diverse event portfolio strategies. The discussion in this paper is based on a review of the literature and content analysis of event strategies from two New Zealand cities: Auckland and Dunedin. The paper suggests an empirically tested framework for exploring event portfolios. It entails such dimensions as the event portfolio strategy, event portfolio focus, portfolio objectives and evaluation tools and event portfolio configuration. This exploratory research provides a comparative analysis of diverse portfolio contexts and offers insights on developing sustainable event strategies while considering diverse local contexts. Core conditions and processes shaping event portfolio design and management are evaluated and strategic factors articulated.
  • Derbyshire Virtual School: Creative Mentoring Programme Final Report

    Nunn, Alexander; Turner, Royce; Adhikari, Joanna; Brooks, Catherine; University of Derby (Derby Virtual School, 2021-06)
  • A Multimodal Discourse Analysis of ‘Brexit’: Flagging the Nation in Political Cartoons

    Lennon, Henry; Kilby, Laura; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Palgrave, 2021-02-04)
    The rhetorical investigation of multimodality in political discourse is a growing concern for discursive researchers adopting critical approaches. The study of political cartoons is a prime example of how both visual and linguistic meaning can be constructed and interpreted based on its prevailing social, cultural and political settings. Adopting a multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA) approach, this chapter further pursues the study of multimodality in political communication by examining a corpus of political cartoons—drawn from the UK and beyond—concerned with the UK’s Referendum on membership of the European Union and the subsequent vote to leave in 2016. We analyse how the rhetoric of these cartoons flags the construction of national identity, otherness and belonging, lending themselves to condensed ideological messages seeking to frame Brexit. It is argued such cartoons can be seen as micro-instances of the anchoring of Brexit as a self-referential political divide defined by oppositional discourses and their accompanying intellectual legacy. A phenomenon, which, we contend, is richly explained by the rhetorical communication of the visual alongside the linguistic. We conclude the chapter by reflecting on how MCDA can assist our understanding of political communication and contribute to the critical tradition of discursive psychological work.
  • A case study for merging supply chain and blockchain in Australian manufacturer

    Daniel, Jay; Maroun, E; Fynes, B; University of Derby; University of Technology Sydney; University College Dublin (POMS, 2021)
    This paper examines implementation of Blockchain technology within an Australian manufacturer supply chain. We present a summary of the challenges in adopting this technology. The adoption of Blockchain technology has potential to bring greater transparency, validity across supply chain processes, and improvement of communication between all stakeholders and customers involved.
  • The sexual life of men with psychopathic traits

    Zara, Georgia; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Farrington, David P.; University of Turin; University of Cambridge; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-08-03)
    This paper explores the sexuality of individuals with psychopathic traits. Sexuality is not only a physiological need, it is a way by which people connect to others. According to a Darwinian perspective, psychopathic traits are seen as adaptive responses to environmental conditions, and as a nonpathological and reproductively viable life history strategy, although superficial emotionality and a detached interpersonal style characterise individuals who are high on psychopathic traits. Data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development are analyzed. This is a prospective longitudinal study of 411 London males, with face-to-face interviews from age 8 to age 48. Men who are high on psychopathic traits were likely to drift from one relationship to another, without a particular attachment to any of them, to be sexually promiscuous, and they never used contraception, which increased their likelihood of having several children from different partners. Findings provide: ▪ An insight into the non-criminal sexual behaviour of males with high psychopathic traits. ▪ Evidence on a pattern of unsafe/risky sexual relations by males with high psychopathic traits. ▪ Information on targeting risk factors to prevent the intergenerational transmission of psychopathy. These findings are significant in highlighting the impact of psychopathic traits upon interpersonal and family dynamics in community samples, since detecting the impact of problematic intimate relationships is difficult in the absence of evident criminality. Rather than completely neglecting their children, men with psychopathic traits spent time with their sons but not with their daughters.
  • Innovation in Small & Medium Enterprises in São Paulo

    Freitas, Adriano; Riascos, Luis; Andrade, Alexandre; Faco, Julio; Gallotta, Bruno; Universidade Federal do ABC; University of Derby (International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, 2021-04)
    The Brazilian Small & Medium Enterprises (SMEs) represent over 98% of all active companies in the country in 2020. The role of innovation in processes must receive special attention, which leads us to write this article to measure the Dimensions of Innovation in companies. The Radar of Innovation was applied to support the model of the diagnostic method tool, which was established to perform data analysis with the needs of each organization. Through this methodology, analyzing the 12 Dimensions of Innovation for a sample of 20 SMEs in the manufacturing segment, in the south region of São Paulo, is used for the research fieldwork. The role was to promote recommendations and collaboration, to improve the opportunities to be replicated in other organizations with similar challenges. The contribution of this work is the Dimension Processes, since most participants had common results. They all found the need to differentiate themselves from their competitors.
  • Social Marketing: Advancing a New Planning Framework to Guide Programmes

    Akbar, M Bilal; Ndupu, Lawrence; French, Jeff; Lawson, Alison; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing Ltd, London (Emerald, 2021-05-31)
    This paper develops and presents a new planning framework of social marketing, known as CSD-IES (Consumer Research, Segmentation, Design of the Social Programme, Implementation, Evaluation and Sustainability). The proposed framework is based on recent theoretical developments in social marketing and is informed by the key strengths of existing social marketing planning approaches. The CSD-IES planning framework incorporates emerging principles of social marketing. For example, sustainability in changed behaviour, ethical considerations in designing social marketing programmes, the need for continuous research to understand the changing needs of the priority audience during the programme, and the need for explicit feedback mechanisms. Research Implications – The CSD-IES framework is a dynamic and flexible framework that guides social marketers, other practitioners, and researchers to develop, implement, and evaluate effective and sustainable social marketing programmes to influence or change specific behaviours based on available resources. This paper makes an important contribution to social marketing theory and practice by integrating elements of behaviour maintenance, consideration of ethical perspectives and continuous feedback mechanisms in developing the CSD-IES framework, bringing it in line with the global consensus definition of social marketing.
  • Access to Finance for Cleantech Innovation and Investment: Evidence from U.K. Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Cowling, Marc; Weixi, Liu; University of Derby; University of Bath (IEEE, 2021-05-03)
    Clean technology (cleantech) is becoming increasingly important as firms and industries seek to address challenges around the global scarcity of resources and also achieve wider social and environmental goals. Yet there are underlying problems with how capital markets respond to this increasing demand for new and innovative cleantech investments. In this article, we use a large U.K. dataset to first consider the extent to which firms engaging with cleantech increase their demand for external capital. We then consider how different types of debt and equity financiers deal with this demand for funds. Our key findings are that: 1) businesses engaging with clean technologies have a higher demand for external capital and 2) these demands are not being fully met by traditional providers which forces firms to seek out alternative and nontraditional sources of finance.
  • Chasing a pot of gold: an analysis of emerging recovery-oriented addiction policies in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands

    Bellaert, Lore; Martinelli, Thomas; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Best, David; van de Mheen, Dike; Vander Laenen, Freya; Ghent University; Tilberg University, The Netherlands; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-04-26)
    Following the paradigm shift to recovery in the Anglophone world, recovery is also gaining momentum in drug policy and practice in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands. Since the meaning of recovery is being debated internationally, broadening the assessment of how the recovery framework is applied in policy discourse and how it is implemented in various international contexts is imperative. This com parative policy analysis aims to assess similarities and differences in addiction recovery vision, imple mentation, and evaluation in Flanders and the Netherlands. The thematic analysis draws upon a triangulation of different data collection methods: a focus group (n ¼ 14) and interviews (n ¼ 21) with key figures in the addictions field, followed by analyses of relevant policy documents (n ¼ 9). Our find ings show that a holistic vision of addiction recovery is endorsed in both countries. Although differen ces in policy development occurred (i.e. centrally driven in Flanders versus ‘bottom-up’ in the Netherlands), similar challenges emerged concerning recovery-oriented addiction policies. While policy makers in Flanders and the addiction sector in the Netherlands strongly proclaim recovery, structural implementation, dedicated funding, and systematic evaluation of recovery-oriented policies are lacking. This study suggests that systematic inclusion of experts by experience and aligning government and practice level funding and policies are crucial.
  • Justice capital: A model for reconciling structural and agentic determinants of desistance

    Best, David; Hamilton, Sharynne; Hall, Lauren; Bartels, Lorana; University of Derby; University of Western Australia; University of Lincoln; Australian National University (SAGE, 2021-04-08)
    The emerging literature on desistance (and recovery from addictions) has focused on key life-course transitions that can be characterised as the need for jobs (meaningful activities), friends (transitioning to pro-social) and houses (a home free from threat). The term ‘recovery capital’ is used to characterise personal, social and community resources an individual can draw upon to support their recovery, partly bridging agentic (per sonal) and structural (community) factors. The development of the concept of ‘justice capital’ furthers this reconciliation, by focusing on resources an individual can access and the resources that an institution can provide. We build on this by outlining the concept of institutional justice capital (IJC) to examine the role of criminal justice insti tutions in supporting or suppressing justice capital, particularly for marginalised groups. We use a case study approach, drawing on recent studies in prisons in Australia and the United Kingdom to develop a model of justice capital at an institutional level and discuss how this can shape reform of prisons and can be matched to the needs of offenders. The paper concludes with a discussion of future directions in implementing an IJC model, to deliver a strengths-based approach to promoting desistance and creating a metric for assessing the rehabilitative activities of institutions.
  • The Strengths and Barriers Recovery Scale (SABRS): Relationships matter in building strengths and overcoming barriers

    Best, David; Sondhi, Arun; Brown, Lorna; Nisic, Mulka; Martinelli, Thomas; van de Mheen, Dike; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; University of Derby; Therapeutic Solutions (Addictions), London; Recovered Users Network (RUN), Brussels, Belgium; et al. (Frontiers, 2021-03-26)
    There is a well-established relationship between isolation and both morbidity and mortality in the context of addiction recovery, yet the protective effects of intimate and familial relationships have not been adequately assessed. The current paper uses the European Life In Recovery database to assess the association between relationship status and living with dependent children on recovery capital of people in recovery from drug addiction, operationalised by the Strengths And Barriers Recovery Scale (SABRS). The study participants were drawn from the REC-PATH study and supplemented by a second sample recruited by the Recovered Users Network (RUN) across various European countries, resulting in a combined sample of 1,313 individuals completing the survey, primarily online. The results show that, in recovery, those who are married or co habiting reported significantly greater recovery strengths and fewer barriers to recovery, and reported greater gains in recovery capital across their recovery journeys. Similar associations are found for participants who have dependent children living with them. There is also some indication that this association is stronger for female than for male participants. Finally, having more people that one can rely on and a greater proportion of people in recovery in the social network are both linked to greater recovery capital and greater self-reported growth in recovery capital. We conclude that this study provides further evidence in favour of a “social cure” in recovery, in which close familial ties are associated with stronger recovery resources
  • Estimating a treatment effect on reoffending by people in prison with an alcohol use disorder: a national matched propensity score analysis

    Sondhi, Arun; Leidl, Alessandro; Best, David; Therapeutic Solutions (Addictions) London; Statistical Services Centre, Reading, UK; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-23)
    Little is known as to the efficacy of treatment interventions for an alcohol use disorder (AUD) to reduce reoffending. A quasi-experimental propensity score matched observational study was deployed to calculate the average treatment effect on reoffending for people in prison with an AUD exposed to prison-based treatment compared to a matched control group. A one-to-one match without replacement followed by a marginal Cox proportional hazards time-to-event model with the treatment group only were also run. No statistically signifi cant difference in reoffending rates and risk of reoffending on release were noted. Analyses suggest that the treatment group were more likely to be treated for binge drinking than individuals assessed who commit crime due to their consump tion of alcohol. The English treatment model is an opportunity to create an enhanced system that integrates public health whilst addressing recidivism. Further work is required assess ing the effect of multiple treatments on reoffending
  • Holidays and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of Indian states

    Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA (Wiley, 2021-05-01)
    The number of holidays differs significantly across Indian states. Moreover, some of the governing political parties have been accused of using holidays as a tool either to mollify disgruntled workers or to woo voters before the state elections. In this context, this paper explores the relationship between the number of holidays and economic growth across 24 Indian states, spanning the period 2008–2016, by employing a panel model analysis. The paper presents evidence suggesting that holidays seem to affect growth negatively in the rich states but are inconsequential for the growth performance of the poor states.
  • Researching entrepreneurship: an approach to develop subjective understanding

    Rajasinghe, Duminda; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; AFG College with University of Aberdeen, Doha, Qatar (Emerald, 2021-04-29)
    Entrepreneurship is a complex social activity. Hence, knowledge production in the field requires inclusivity and diversity within research approaches and perspectives to appreciate the richness of the phenomenon. However, the dominance of positivist research in the field is visible, and the current qualitative research is also predominantly restricted to popular templates. This seems to have limited the understanding of entrepreneurship. This paper critically discusses the appropriateness of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as an innovative qualitative research methodology that facilitates a fuller appreciation of the richness and diversity of entrepreneurship. This conceptual paper critically evaluates IPA's relevance for the stated purpose by reviewing both entrepreneurship and IPA literature. It discusses how IPA's philosophical underpinnings facilitate scholars to appreciate the wholeness of the phenomenon and provides literature informed data analysis guidance, thereby addressing some of the weaknesses of the qualitative research within the field. Critical evaluation of the literature suggests that IPA is an appropriate research methodology for entrepreneurship. It has the potential to address some interesting and timely questions to elaborate, deepen and qualify existing theory or to study relatively unexplored areas within the field. The laid-out guidance helps scholars to develop informed rationale for their research decisions and to ensure quality and rigour in qualitative research. This paper promotes the analysis of how people make sense of their experience as a valid way of knowing. IPA has a unique identity as it incorporates phenomenology, hermeneutics and idiography as a way to explore first-hand human experience to uncover qualitative understanding of entrepreneurship. The clear guidance and justifications in the paper promote scholarly confidence and address some preconceptions related to rigour, quality and validity of qualitative studies. Incorporating IPA into entrepreneurship, the paper also contributes to the demand for diversity, inclusivity and pluralism in qualitative research perspectives and approaches.
  • COVID-19 impact on waste management − business opportunity Emirate of Ajman − UAE

    Alhosani, Khaled Mueen; Liravi , Pouria; University of Derby (EDP Sciences, 2021-04-12)
    The UAE's lifestyle has recently developed with increased population resulted in an increased waste from different resources (hazardous and non-hazardous). This has significantly got accumulated during the pandemic. Crisis management is one of the most important management practices that need careful modelling to include planning, framework practices, training, and reserved resources. Naturally, a complete plan for the expected crisis is ready for implementation when a crisis starts to reduce the crisis impacts. Moreover, those plans are to cover the periods before, during and after that crisis. Waste is a resource for many health, environmental, and social problems when not managed. Therefore, this paper aims to introduce elements needed in that combination of waste and crisis management and exploring the main critical elements that need to be contained and carefully studied to enhance modern waste management. The presumed management model examines the waste management practices prior to, during, and after the crisis. COVID-19 pandemics have severely affected all nations and critically disabled many services that governments are providing. Data collected for similar periods before and after the pandemic of the waste, including the amounts, practices, and associated outcomes. A concluded resultwas used to introduce a new framework model for the required initiatives of waste − crisis management. Results showed the importance of using the Waste − Business correlation for high-quality management. During the COVID-19 crises, a significant challenge is the massive quantity of regular waste that has become hazardous and required special treatment adding more cost and resulting in recyclable material reduction. The article has concluded that change in the dynamics of plastic, food, and biomedical waste generation during the same time has, however, stirred the woes of solid waste management. The non-hazardous waste was considered hazardous in many cases to minimize the chances of contamination. Inevitably, plastic has increased as personal protection and healthcare items increased with the reduced recycling process to avoid its adverse effect. Private businesses need to support Governmental efforts to deal with contingency. Materials Recovery Facilities (MRF) were getting less waste due to worries of contaminations and virus spreading. All these challenges and practices had a considerable effect on the Government waste associated budget.
  • Revisiting Value Co-creation and Co-destruction in Tourism

    Cavagnaro, Elena; Michopoulou, Eleni; Pappas, Nikolaos; NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Informa UK Limited, 2021-03-05)
    As COVID-19 has shown in a way unimaginable before it hit, tourism is susceptible to uncertainty and incidents that can directly impact the supply and demand of its discretionary products and services. Before the pandemic, consensus had been reached among practitioners and academics that consumer experience is more important than ever for enterprises as well as destinations, as the sector had become globalized, reached maturity and became highly competitive. Tourism came to a grinding halt due to the pandemic and recovery may take years. Still, the pathway to success (or failure) lies on the overall satisfaction of visitors and tourists, which heavily depends on perceived value; a concept that can be co-created or co-destroyed by the very interaction between all social actors and stakeholders involved. Value creation or destruction is critical not just for traditional supply of and demand for, but also for an array of actors across value and distribution chains (including for example staff and intermediaries across the networks). The special issue’s aim was to assist the better understanding of value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism development by bringing together different perspectives and disciplines. Judging from the diversity of the theoretical perspectives of the articles collected in this issue and the richness of the presented findings the special issue has indeed achieved its aim. Yet some real trends could be distinguished: the relevance of online communication and information; the importance of interpersonal encounters and social interaction for value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism; and the challenges in the design and delivery process of co-created experiences.
  • Politics, research design, and the ‘architecture’ of criminal careers studies

    Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-04-22)
    Criminal careers research is one of the bedrocks – if not the bedrock – of criminology. It remains a key focal point of criminological research, and has embraced ideas and theorising from sociology, psychology, psychiatry and urban and community studies. Despite the widening of the landscape of what might be termed ‘the criminological enterprise’ (to include victimology, prisons research, punishment, deterrence, and environmental criminology), criminal careers (now differentiated into studies of onset, persistence and desistance) remains a key plank of criminology. This article critiques the research design of longitudinal studies of criminal careers, arguing that a key explanatory factor has been consistently overlooked in criminal careers research, due, in part, to the research design of such studies. In focussing on the role of politically-motivated changes to economic policies and the re-structuring of the industrial base this produced, I empirically relate individual offending careers to politics in way very few have done before. The article touches upon a series of suggestions for how empirical studies of criminal careers might be improved.
  • Martial arts: the possible benefit that can be obtained during a period of lockdown

    Spring, Charles; University of Derby (Heriot Watt University, 2021-01-25)
    The following thought piece follows one individuals’ experience of being in lockdown in the United Kingdom and how the practice of martial arts assisted in this experience. Through the use of diary entries, their feelings and thoughts are expressed and how the bad ones of these are assisted through the practice and ability to focus on something other. There is a discussion that draws on other academic and authors perspectives, that evidence and support the thought pieces viewpoint. The piece concludes that practicing martial arts can help individuals through enabling them to have a focus and outlet to help cope with deeper emotional states caused by a situation such as lockdown.
  • Gender differences in theory of mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning in an offending and a matched non-offending population

    Spenser, Karin; Bull, Ray; Betts, Lucy; Winder, Belinda; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Sage, 2021-04-15)
    Previous research suggests that a lack of pro-social skills is characteristic of an offending personality. Two hundred male and female offenders and matched controls completed measures to assess: Theory of Mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning. Significant differences between the offenders and the control group, as well as between the male and female participants, were detected in theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning with offenders scoring lower than the control group, and with males scoring lower than females on most tests. The ability to assess Theory of Mind, empathic understanding, and moral reasoning, and subsequently to identify reduced ability, is not only useful for researchers but will also allow practitioners to tailor existing (or develop new) interventions specific to the needs of individuals. This could be particularly useful in terms of recidivism when applied to those involved in anti-social or offending behaviour.

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