• Finding common ground through language and movement: examining the role of the writer in Rosemary Lee’s The Suchness of Heni and Eddie.

      Collard-Stokes, Gemma; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2012-05-14)
      Since the development of interdisciplinary practice, dance has fashioned and cultivated many relationships with other art forms. In this search to uncover new territory choreographers often merge art forms to facilitate the broadening of their field. Writing has always been a successful tool in the communication and critique of dance performance. However, writing has also played a considerable role in the process of creating dance, yet this association remains under-represented. This writing aims to demonstrate some of the ongoing and recent perspectives that dance and writing have nurtured, paying particular attention to the act of creative writing and dance in a collaborative partnership. This investigation concerns itself with the act of writing as creative discourse, presenting the argument for the writer to be considered an invaluable partner in the creative process. Through practical research, a case study was carried out examining the ongoing collaboration between choreographer Rosemary Lee and writer Niki Pollard. The findings from this research provide evidence of how modes of writing can contribute to choreographic investigation, providing a performative research bridge between practical and theoretical negotiations.
    • Fitness to practise: Incident reporting and professional behaviour

      Partner, Alexandra; Hyde, Emma; University of Derby (College of Radiographers, 2016-11-25)
      Fitness to Practise is a complex, multi-faceted issue which impacts on both clinical and academic staff. It can be challenging to manage Fitness to Practise issues and reach a satisfactory outcome for all parties. Fitness to Practise issues are often complicated by a lack of evidence, or a failure to follow the correct process for managing the case. A key element of this is ‘Failing to Fail’ clinical assessments. This can lead to cases being taken to appeal with the Office for the Independent Adjudicator (OIA). This workshop will discuss the issues affecting Fitness of Practise cases, and share ideas and strategies for managing these situations more effectively. The experience of participating in a HCPC Fitness to Practise panel will be shared, in order help workshop participants understand the Fitness to Practise issues from the regulatory perspective.
    • Formulating a model for personal and professional development using a research methodology in solo autobiographical performance

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (European Federation of Dramatherapy Conference 2016, Bucharest., 2016-05-07)
      The workshop will offer an autobiographical performance by the presenter followed by a workshop and discussion that will explore the potential for using solo performance for personal and professional development using the rigor of a research methodology. The workshop will be of particular interest for those who want to make clearer links with practice as a Drama Therapist, artist and researcher. The model utilises specific research methodologies to explore the synthesis of research and performance. The performance is an ongoing development using heuristic research methodology and an action research style approach to explore practice as a therapist and Dramatherapy trainer. Ethrington (2002) suggests that heuristic research offers the opportunity for therapeutic development whilst offering a critical gaze on therapist’s practice that can mirror supervision practice. Action research explores our own story in the company of others, who are also exploring their story (McNiff, 2007). In respect of both research approaches the audience, participants and witnesses of the performance help inform the development of the model using solo autobiographical performance. The post show workshop will explore the synthesis of three disciplines of Drama Therapist, artist and researcher to explore personal themes and obstacles that might impact on practice as a Drama Therapist. Yalom (2002) makes a clear link with personal themes and professional themes, suggesting where one is stuck personally one is also stuck professionally. The workshop will be co-facilitated to develop participant reflection; focusing on archetypal motifs and myth elicited from the performance; the impact of theatre and how the imagination can be cultivated specifically for personal and professional development using the characteristics of heuristic research.
    • Gender representation, power and identity in mental health and art therapy.

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-14)
    • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

      McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (2019-11-06)
      Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
    • A heuristic model of supervision using small objects to develop the senses

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (Iris Publishers, 2019-07-31)
      The research explores how the conceptual frame of Heuristic inquiry can inform non-verbal exploration in psychotherapy supervision practices. The author explores their practice as a dramatherapist and how small objects can broaden the awareness of the supervisees own relationship patterns. Small objects helped to re-conceptualise the therapeutic dynamic using metaphor and make conscious parts of the supervisee experience they had been unaware.
    • The host revisited.

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby; Original music by Matt Le Mare; Directed by Katy Tozer (Buxton Fringe Festival 2018, 2018-07-12)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • The host#1

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (WeAreKunst Art Gallery, Belper, 2016-10-08)
    • The host#3

      Bird, Drew; Tozer, Katy; University of Derby; Le Mare, Matt; Baron, Chris (The Maypole Café Bar and Theatre, 2018-02-10)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Chris Baron, music directed by Matt Le Mare. Directed by Katy Tozer
    • The host#4

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (European Federation of Dramatherapy 4th European Dramatherapy Conference: Borders in Action, Nürtingen, Germany., 2018-04-28)
      The performance is an ongoing solo performance that explores the borders between characters and their external and internal worlds. A host guides the audience through the performance introducing them to various characters and their worlds. A bride groom stands at the front of the church, an integrator attempts to squeeze out a password from a man bound to a chair, a cheerleader relentlessly practices her routine, an emaciated women is tied to a tree and a door waits to be opened. The external and internal world of the performer comes under close scrutiny as the host of the show attempts to pull the fragmented show together with no actors or scenery and only one chair. The performance exposes the borders of the characters rigid worlds and the transformation and energy that ensues when those world collide and elide. The performance explores the borders of the personal and autobiographical with the professional role of a Drama therapist and facilitator. The performer facilitates and guides an autobiographical performance that is informed by the research methodology known as Heuristic Inquiry. Using the characteristics of intuition and illumination the performer draws on personal material to deepen ones understanding of a Drama therapist and the importance of play in the therapeutic process. The borders between the story of the performer and the audience’s story are drawn closer together as the performance draws on mythological and existential themes. The performance approach breaks down the 4th wall, guiding the audience into a shared world and existence with the staged characters. The performance plays with the imagination and the borders between the seen and unseen and the energy that is created when separate worlds elide. Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • How can arts-based research in dramatic performance illuminate understanding of the therapeutic relationship?

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (Intellect, 2019-10-01)
      This article explores how Heuristic Inquiry (HI), harnessed for arts-based research using solo performance, deepened the author’s understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The research explores the rehearsal and devising process of nine performances to explore barriers to a playful encounter with the audience and client using the myth of Psyche and Cupid. Themes of seeking approval, technique and shame are considered as potential obstacles to forging a co-creative therapeutic alliance.
    • How do hand therapists conservatively manage acute, closed mallet finger? A survey of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists.

      Cook, Samantha; Daniels, Nikki; Woodbridge, Sarah; Barnsley Hospital; University of Derby; Physiotherapy Department, Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, UK; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Sage, 2016-08-13)
      Introduction Previous research concerning the conservative management of mallet finger has focused on splint application, with limited representation of supplementary rehabilitation and best practice. This research sought to investigate the practice and opinions of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists regarding their current treatment and to determine whether any specific exercise prescription or rehabilitation protocols are followed. Methods British Association of Hand Therapists members were contacted via e-mail and requested to complete an online survey. Thirty-five responses (5.7% response rate), 30 (4.8% response rate) of which were fully completed were obtained over the eight-week data collection period. The questionnaire consisted of 30 questions (20 quantitative and 10 qualitative) concerning therapists’ roles and condition management. Responses were analysed in terms of response frequencies, percentages and thematic text analysis. Results The results demonstrated current clinical practices in line with available best-evidenced practice. Conservative therapeutic management is diverse and varied. Therapists believe their role to be significant in optimising outcome success. Discussion Exercises and other interventions supplementary to splinting are commonly utilised in the therapeutic management of acute, closed mallet finger. This research found hand therapists implement a diverse range of clinical skills in order to optimise outcome success. Recommendations for best practice and further research are presented.
    • An internet survey of psychiatrists who have a particular interest in cognitive behavioural therapy: what is the place for the cognitive behavioural model in their role as a psychiatrist?

      Alfaraj, Ali Isa; Whitfield, Graeme; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2015-03-03)
      A survey of psychiatrists with a special interest in CBT was conducted by email correspondence to answer two main questions: ‘What are the uses and the usefulness of the cognitive behavioural model within the day-to-day practice of psychiatrists?’ and ‘What are the most important roles of the consultant medical psychotherapist who has specialized in CBT?’ Despite the constraints of a low response rate the results still reflected the views of 46 psychiatrists who were particularly experienced in the area of CBT. They reported that the cognitive behavioural model was useful in general psychiatric settings, in particular in the engagement of patients, improving client's insight, adherence to medications, and for trainee supervision. The responders reaffirmed previously held views about the role of the consultant medical psychotherapist (CBT), in particular the roles of the assessment and management of complex cases, of taking responsibility for patients with a combination of medical and psychological issues and of teaching CBT to psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. The challenges of translating CBT competencies into generic non-CBT psychiatric settings are discussed, with the important potential role of the medical psychotherapist in this respect. The key skill of formulating cases in secondary care is emphasized.
    • Interrogating women’s experience of ageing: reinforcing or challenging clichés?

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (2015-07)
      The “Representing Self—Representing Ageing” initiative has been funded by the ESRC as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing cross-council research programme. It has consisted of four projects with older women using participatory arts to enable women to articulate their experiences of ageing, and to create alternative images of ageing. Methods have included the use of art elicitation, photo-diaries, film-booths, directed photography, and phototherapy.
    • The introductory guide to art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; Coulter, A.; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (Routledge, 2014)
      Foreword by Professor Judy Rubin. Introduction. What is Art Therapy? On Experiential Learning. An Introduction to Art Therapy. Becoming an Art Therapy Practitioner. Teaching Art Therapy to Allied Health Professionals. Innovative Teaching Strategies. An Overview of Models of Art Therapy. The Role of the Image in Art Therapy & Intercultural Reflections. Working as an Art Therapist with Children. Working as an Art Therapist with Offenders. Art Therapy with Couples and Families. Group Work with Adults. Art Therapy and Co-therapy. Starting Supervision. Models of Supervision & Personal Therapy. International Perspectives. A Critical Glossary of Key Terms.
    • An investigation into first year diagnostic radiography students' preparedness to deal with ill service users in two UK universities

      Hyde, Emma; Strudwick, Ruth; University of Derby; University of Suffolk (Society of Radiographers, 2017-09-01)
      This article disseminated research that was undertaken at two UK universities to investigate the preparedness of first year students to deal with very ill service users. The research took a qualitative approach, using focus groups at both universities to collect data. The data was audio-recorded and transcribed, and then analysed using a thematic approach. The article discusses the issues which were identified by participants in the study, and makes recommendations for curriculum development to support future students.
    • Is there a role for simulation based education within conventional diagnostic radiography? A literature review

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-02-07)
      Simulation based education is advancing, but is there a role for it in Diagnostic Radiography? The aim of this literature review was to understand the use of simulation within conventional diagnostic radiography education to raise awareness of this pedagogical approach. Objectives were to identify the prevalence and stage of delivery in education; understand the variation of simulation and learning objectives informing its use; and review the perceptions of those using simulation in education and practice. The literature review used a systematic search strategy. Library Plus, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Medline and Google Scholar were reviewed resulting in 703 articles. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied with initial review of title and abstract resulting in 22 articles. Fifteen articles were selected following full text review. Simulation was used for both pre-and post-registration education. Themes included inter-professional education, use of computer software and improving patient/practitioner interactions. Increased confidence and understanding of professional roles were common outcomes. Simulation is a valuable pedagogical approach for diagnostic radiography education. Staff training and careful implementation of each stage is required to achieve desired learning outcomes.
    • An iterative run-to-run learning model to derive continuous brachial pressure estimates from arterial and venous lines during dialysis treatment

      Stewart, Jill; Stewart, Paul; Walker, Tom; Viramontes-Hörner, Daniela; Lucas, Bethany; White, Kelly; Taal, Maarten W.; Selby, Nicholas M.; Morris, Mel; University of Derby; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2020-11-28)
      Objective: Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring is not yet part of routine practice in renal dialysis units but could be a valuable tool in the detection and prevention of significant variations in patient blood pressure during treatment. Feasibility studies have delivered an initial validation of a method which utilises pressure sensors in the extra-corporeal dialysis circuit, without any direct contact with the person receiving treatment. Our main objective is to further develop this novel methodology from its current early development status to a continuous-time brachial artery pressure estimator. Methods: During an in vivo patient feasibility study with concurrent measurement validation by Finapres Nova experimental physiological measurement device, real-time continuous dialysis line pressures, and intermittent occluding arm cuff pressure data were collected over the entire period of (typically 4-hour) dialysis treatments. There was found to be an underlying quasi-linear relationship between arterial line and brachial pressure measurements which supported the development of a mathematical function to describe the relationship between arterial dialysis line pressure and brachial artery BP. However, unmodelled non-linearities, dynamics and time-varying parameters present challenges to the development of an accurate BP estimation system. In this paper, we start to address the problem of physiological parameter time variance by novel application of an iterative learning run-to-run modelling methodology originally developed for process control engineering applications to a parameterised BP model. Results: The iterative run-to-run learning methodology was applied to the real-time data measured during an observational study in 9 patients, supporting subsequent development of an adaptive real-time BP estimator. Tracking of patient BP is analysed for all the subjects in our patient study, supported only by intermittent updates from BP cuff measurements. Conclusion: The methodology and associated technology is shown to be capable of tracking patient BP noninvasively via arterial line pressure measurement during complete 4-hour treatment sessions. A robust and tractable method is demonstrated, and future refinements to the approach are defined.