• Quantitative analysis of qualitative information from interviews: a systematic literature review

      Fakis, Apostolos; Hilliam, Rachel; Stoneley, Helen; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (2013-07-05)
      A systematic literature review was conducted on mixed methods area. Objectives: The overall aim was to explore how qualitative information from interviews has been analyzed using quantitative methods. Methods: A contemporary review was undertaken and based on a predefined protocol. The references were identified using inclusion and exclusion criteria and specific key terms in 11 search databases. Results: Evidence was synthesized from 14 references that included the methods used for quantifying qualitative information, analyzing it statistically and the rationale behind this. Gaps in the existing literature and recommendations for future research were identified. Conclusions: This review highlights the need for a new mixed method based on advanced statistical modeling method that will explore complex relationships arising from qualitative information.
    • Radicalisation, de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation in relation to families: Key challenges for research, policy and practice

      Spalek, Basia; University of Derby (Springer, 2015-12-29)
      This article explores linkages between research, policy and practice in relation to the role of families in violent and non-violent radicalisation. The article highlights that there are many similarities between the issues highlighted within the research literature and with those highlighted in policy and practice contexts. Both view families as potentially being risky, as well as potentially being a source of protection and rehabilitation. The article also takes a critical gaze towards families, suggesting that this may detract attention away from the wider socio-political factors that also play a significant role in radicalisation. A focus upon families can also inadvertently lead to the creation and perpetuation of a ‘suspect community’. The article suggests that while families can potentially provide a supportive environment for de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation, safeguards around human rights, information exchange, and child protection must firmly be in place.
    • The rationale behind a dance movement psychotherapy intervention used in a small research pilot in a further education context to develop awareness about young people's body image

      Bunce, Jill; Heyland, Simone; Grogan, Sarah; Padilla, Talia; Williams, Alison; Kilgariff, Sarah; Woodhouse, Chloe; Cowap, Lisa; Davies, Wendy; University of Derby; et al. (2013-10-04)
      This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.
    • Record, pause, rewind: a low tech approach to teaching communication (and other) skills.

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (International Perspectives In Education Conference 2018, 2018-10)
      Over the last 3 years I have developed a technique for teaching communication skills on the BA Applied Social Work programme at the University of Derby. The idea for the technique was originally based on a skills course I attended which involved the use of video recording equipment. I took the view that I could achieve similar results simply by asking participants to imagine that they were being recorded! The technique involves students working with a facilitator in groups of approximately 12. They are asked to come prepared to demonstrate their skills with a character from a case study they are familiar with. The character is played by an actor (usually a member of staff). One person from the group volunteers or is asked to play the role of the professional. All are asked to imagine that once the conversation starts the scenario is being recorded on video. At any point the ‘volunteer’ can say “pause” and ask for help from everyone else. The facilitator can also pause in order to make some learning points. And those watching can pause to make suggestions or comments. The technique also allows pauses to be used to ask the ‘actor’ playing the client how they feel about the conversation. The technique allows real time ‘reflection in action’ in a safe environment. After reflection a decision is frequently made to rewind to an earlier point in the conversation to see what happens if the ‘volunteer’ tries a different approach. The technique has proved extremely popular as a learning tool and could be applied to the teaching of a wide range of skills.
    • Recreational burlesque and the aging female body: challenging perceptions

      Collard-Stokes, Gemma; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-10-28)
      Rejecting the association between aging and asexuality that persists in the UK’s cultural representation of the female aging body, this paper reveals the importance of sensuality and maintaining physical agency to older women. It pays attention to the phenomena of participating in recreational burlesque classes to counter and negotiate potentially negative representations. Through in-depth interviews and researcher-as-participant observation, the paper explores the transformative possibilities mediated through participating in theatrically glamorized performance classes and the processes thereby initiated. The author examines the potential of burlesque to offer improvements to wellbeing and healthier self-perceptions for aging women experiencing marginalization through social invisibility.
    • Rediscovering the playful learner.

      Bird, Drew; Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
    • Reduction of visual acuity decreases capacity to evaluate radiographic image quality

      Sá dos Reis, C.; Soares, F.; Bartoli, G.; Dastan, K.; Dhlamini, Z.S.; Hussain, A.; Kroode, D.; McEntee, M.F.; Mekis, N.; Thompson, J.D.; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2020-05-16)
      To determine the impact of reduced visual acuity on the evaluation of a test object and appendicular radiographs. Visual acuity was reduced by two different magnitudes using simulation glasses and compared to normal vision (no glasses). During phase one phantom images were produced for the purpose of counting objects by 13 observers and on phase 2 image appraisal of anatomical structures was performed on anonymized radiographic images by 7 observers. The monitors were calibrated (SMPTE RP133 test pattern) and the room lighting was maintained at 7 ± 1 lux. Image display and data on grading were managed using ViewDEX (v.2.0) and the area under the visual grading characteristic (AUCVGC) was calculated using VGC Analyzer (v1.0.2). Inferential statistics were calculated using SPSS. For the evaluation of appendicular radiographs the total interpretation time was longer when visual acuity was reduced with 2 pairs of simulation glasses (15.4 versus 8.9 min). Visual grading analysis showed that observers can lose the ability to detect anatomical and contrast differences when they have a simulated visual acuity reduction, being more challenging to differentiate low contrast details. No simulation glasses, compared to 1 pair gives an AUCVGC of 0.302 (0.280, 0.333), that decreases to 0.197 (0.175, 0.223) when using 2 pairs of glasses. Reduced visual acuity has a significant negative impact on the evaluation of test objects and clinical images. Further work is required to test the impact of reduced visual acuity on visual search, technical evaluation of a wider range of images as well as pathology detection/characterization performance. It seems that visual performance needs to be considered to reduce the risks associated with incomplete or incorrect diagnosis. If employers or professional bodies were to introduce regular eye tests into health screening it may reduce the risk of misinterpretation as a result of poor vision.
    • The relationship between nature connectedness and eudaimonic well-being: A meta-analysis

      Pritchard, Alison; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; McEwan, Kirsten; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-04-30)
      Nature connectedness relates to an individual’s subjective sense of their relationship with the natural world. A recent meta-analysis has found that people who are more connected to nature also tend to have higher levels of self-reported hedonic well-being; however, no reviews have focussed on nature connection and eudaimonic well-being. This meta-analysis was undertaken to explore the relationship of nature connection with eudaimonic well-being and to test the hypothesis that this relationship is stronger than that of nature connection and hedonic well-being. From 20 samples (n = 4758), a small significant effect size was found for the relationship of nature connection and eudaimonic well-being (r = 0.24); there was no significant difference between this and the effect size (from 30 samples n = 11638) for hedonic well-being (r = 0.20). Of the eudaimonic well-being subscales, personal growth had a moderate effect size which was significantly larger than the effect sizes for autonomy, purpose in life/meaning, self-acceptance, positive relations with others and environmental mastery, but not vitality. Thus, individuals who are more connected to nature tend to have greater eudaimonic well-being, and in particular have higher levels of self-reported personal growth.
    • The role of communities in counter-terrorism: analysing policy and exploring psychotherapeutic approaches within community settings

      Spalek, Basia; Weeks, Douglas; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-10-28)
      The role of communities in preventing or responding to terrorism and political violence is increasingly finding prominence within government strategies, nationally and internationally. At the same time, implementation of effective community based partnerships has been nominal. Adding additional complexity to this problem are policies such as Prevent in Britain which was arguably developed with good intentions but has received significant and sustained criticism by the very communities it sought to engage with. The result has been ongoing discussions within community practice and research arenas associated with radicalisation, extremism, and terrorism, as to the role, if any, that communities might play in the counter-terrorism environment. This article explores that environment and highlights some of the community based perceptions and initiatives that prevail in the UK. In particular, innovations around the development of psychotherapeutic frameworks of understanding in relation to counter-terrorism are discussed, alongside the role of connectors.
    • Routledge International Handbook of Dramatherapy

      Holmwood, Clive; Jennings, Sue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2016-05)
      From Australia, to Korea to the Middle East to Africa through Europe and into North America, dramatherapists are developing a range of working practices using the curative power of theatre and drama within a therapeutic context to work with diverse populations. This handbook covers a range of topics from esteemed academics and practitioners from around the globe that show the breadth and strength of dramatherapy as a developing and maturing profession. Divided into four main sections that look at current international developments, theoretical approaches, specific practice and new and innovative approaches, the book will appeal to academics, practitioners and students in the field.
    • Routledge international handbook of play, therapeutic play and play therapy

      Jennings, Sue; Holmwood, Clive; University of derby; University of Witwatersrand, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Routledge International Handbook of Play, Therapeutic Play and Play Therapy is the first book of its kind to provide an overview of key aspects of play and play therapy, considering play on a continuum from generic aspects through to more specific applied and therapeutic techniques and as a stand-alone discipline. Presented in four parts, the book provides a unique overview of, and ascribes equal value to, the fields of play, therapeutic play, play in therapy and play therapy. Chapters by academics, play practitioners, counsellors, arts therapists and play therapists from countries as diverse as Japan, Cameroon, India, the Czech Republic, Israel, USA, Ireland, Turkey, Greece and the UK explore areas of each topic, drawing links and alliances between each.  The book includes complex case studies with children, adolescents and adults in therapy with arts and play therapists, research with children on play, work in schools, outdoor play and play therapy, animal-assisted play therapy, work with street children and play in therapeutic communities around the world. Routledge International Handbook of Play, Therapeutic Play and Play Therapy demonstrates the centrality of play in human development, reminds us of the creative power of play and offers new and innovative applications of research and practical technique. It will be of great interest to academics and students of play, play therapy, child development, education and the therapeutic arts. It will also be a key text for play and creative arts therapists, both in practice and in training, play practitioners, social workers, teachers and anyone working with children.
    • The schwartz center rounds: supporting mental health workers with the emotional impact of their work.

      Allen, Deborah; Spencer, Graham; McEwan, Kirsten; Catarino, Francisca; Evans, Rachael; Crooks, Sarah; Gilbert, Paul; University Hospitals Derby & Burton NHS; Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-05-15)
      In healthcare settings there is an emotional cost to caring which can result in compassion-fatigue, burnout, secondary trauma and compromised patient care. Innovative workplace interventions such as the Schwartz Rounds offer a group reflective practice forum for clinical and non-clinical professionals to reflect on the emotional aspects of working in healthcare. Whilst the Rounds are established in medical health practice, this study presents an evaluation of the Rounds offered to mental health services. The Rounds were piloted amongst 150 mental health professionals for 6 months and evaluated using a mixed-methods approach with standardised evaluation forms completed after each Round and a focus group (n=9) at one-month follow-up. This paper also offers a unique six-year follow-up of the evaluation of the Rounds. Rounds were rated as helpful, insightful, relevant and at six years follow-up Rounds were still rated as valuable and viewed as embedded. Focus groups indicated that Rounds were valued because of the opportunity to express emotions (in particular negative emotions towards patients that conflict with the professional care-role), share experiences, and feel validated and supported by colleagues. The findings indicate that Schwartz Rounds offer a positive application in mental healthcare settings. The study supports the use of interventions which provide an ongoing forum in which to discuss emotions, develop emotional literacy, provide peer-support and set an intention for becoming a more compassionate organisation in which to work.
    • Searching compassion in a crowd: Evaluation of a novel compassion visual search task to reduce self-criticism

      McEwan, Kirsten; Dandeneau, Stephane; Gilbert, Paul; Maratos, Frances; Andrew, Lucy; Chotai, Shivani; Elander, James; University of Derby (ECronicon Open Access, 2019-04-15)
      Background: The ability to appropriately process social stimuli such as facial expressions is crucial to emotion regulation and the maintenance of supportive interpersonal relationships. Cognitive Bias Modification Tasks (CBMTs) are being investigated as potential interventions for those who struggle to appropriately process social stimuli. Aims: Two studies aimed to assess the effectiveness of a novel computerised ‘Compassion Game’ CBMT compared with a validated ‘Self-Esteem Game’ (Study 1, n=66) and a Neutral Control Game (Study 2, n=59). Method: In each study, baseline, post-task, and one-month follow-up measures of 3 self-reported forms of self-criticism (inadequate self, hated self, and self-reassurance) were used to examine the benefits of two weeks’ attentional training. Results: Analyses show that the novel Compassion Game significantly reduced inadequate self-criticism at post and one-month follow-up (Studies 1 and 2) and increased self-reassurance (Study 1). Results also show that the Self-Esteem (Study 1) and the Neutral Control Game (Study 2), which also used social stimuli, produced reductions in inadequate self-criticism. Conclusions: Results suggest that training one’s attention toward social stimuli can improve inadequate self-criticism. Implications for the use of compassionate stimuli in such CBMTs are discussed.
    • Self-belief in education

      Jinks, Gavin; Harber, Denise; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2018-12)
    • Shifting identities: exploring occupational identity for those in recovery from an eating disorder

      Dark, Esther; Carter, Sarah; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-11-23)
      The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, transition and formation of occupational identity for those in recovery from eating disorders (EDs). Semi-structured “episodic” interviews were carried out with six women, self-identifying in recovery from an ED. Narrative-type-analysis produced a distilled narrative of participant’s accounts, before use of thematic analysis compared and extracted pertinent themes. During recovery from an ED, significant shifts occurred in occupational identities, moving from sole identification with the ED, to a greater understanding of self; facilitated by increased engagement in meaningful occupations, adapting occupational meaning, connecting with self and others and the importance of becoming and belonging. This is the first known piece of research exploring occupational identity in relation to EDs. The findings are applicable to occupational therapists and add to the growing body of qualitative research into ED's.
    • Shmapped: development of an app to record and promote the well-being benefits of noticing urban nature

      McEwan, Kirsten; Richardson, Miles; Brindley, Paul; Sheffield, David; Tait, Crawford; Johnson, Steve; Sutch, Hana; Ferguson, Fiona; University of Derby; University of Debry (Oxford Academic, 2019-03-05)
      The majority of research to date on the links between well-being and green spaces comes from cross-sectional studies. Shmapped is an app that allows for the collection of well-being and location data live in the field and acts as a novel dual data collection tool and well-being intervention, which prompts users to notice the good things about their surroundings. We describe the process of developing Shmapped from storyboarding, budgeting, and timescales; selecting a developer; drawing up data protection plans; and collaborating with developers and end-user testers to ultimately publishing Shmapped. The development process and end-user testing resulted in a highly functional app. Limitations and future uses of such novel dual data collection and intervention apps are discussed and recommendations are made for prospective developers and researchers.
    • A smartphone app for improving mental health through connecting with urban nature

      McEwan, Kirsten; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; Ferguson, Fiona; Brindley, Paul; University of Sheffield; University of Derby (MDPI, 2019-09-12)
      In an increasingly urbanised world where mental health is currently in crisis, interventions to increase human engagement and connection with the natural environment are one of the fastest growing, most widely accessible, and cost-effective ways of improving human wellbeing. This study aimed to provide an evaluation of a smartphone app-based wellbeing intervention. In a randomised controlled trial study design, the app prompted 582 adults, including a subgroup of adults classified by baseline scores on the Recovering Quality of Life scale as having a common mental health problem (n = 148), to notice the good things about urban nature (intervention condition) or built spaces (active control). There were statistically significant and sustained improvements in wellbeing at one-month follow-up. Importantly, in the noticing urban nature condition, compared to a built space control, improvements in quality of life reached statistical significance for all adults and clinical significance for those classified as having a mental health difficulty. This improvement in wellbeing was partly explained by significant increases in nature connectedness and positive affect. This study provides the first controlled experimental evidence that noticing the good things about urban nature has strong clinical potential as a wellbeing intervention and social prescription.
    • A smoother ride: facilitating the transition between classroom and clinical placement

      Hyde, Emma; University of Derby (NET 2014 conference, 2014-09-02)
      The findings of my research around the transition first year student radiographers undergo when they start their first clinical placement.
    • Sonographic parameters for diagnosing fetal head engagement during labour.

      Wiafe, Yaw Amo; Whitehead, Bill; Venables, Heather; Odoi, Alexander T.; University of Derby; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technolog; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Nursing, Radiography and Healthcare, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana (Sage, 2018-02-01)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of the head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and the head–symphysis distance as intrapartum ultrasound parameters in the determination of an engaged fetal head. Two hundred and one women in labour underwent both ultrasound and digital vaginal examination in the estimation of fetal head station. The transperineal ultrasound measured head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and head–symphysis distance for values correlating with digital vaginal examination head station. Using station 0 as the minimum level of head engagement, correlating cutoff values for head–perineum distance, angle of progression, and head–symphysis distance were obtained. Receiver operating characteristics were used in determining the diagnostic performance of these cut-off values for the detection of fetal head engagement. With head–perineum distance of 3.6 cm the sensitivity and specificity of sonographic determination of engaged fetal head were 78.7 and 72.3%, respectively. A head–symphysis distance of 2.8 cm also had sensitivity and specificity of 74.5 and 70.8%, respectively, in determining engagement, whilst an angle of progression of 101 was consistent with engagement by digital vaginal examination with 68.1% sensitivity and 68.2% specificity. Ultrasound shows high diagnostic performance in determining engaged fetal head at a head–perineum distance of 3.6 cm, head–symphysis distance of 2.8 cm, and angle of progression of 101.
    • Student mentoring and peer learning.

      Jinks, Gavin; Maneely-Edmunds, Carl; University of Derby (2018-03-27)
      A presentation exploring the implementation of a student mentoring and peer learning project on the BA Social Work programme at the University of Derby