• A heuristic model of supervision using small objects to develop the senses

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (Iris Publishers, 2019-07-31)
      The research explores how the conceptual frame of Heuristic inquiry can inform non-verbal exploration in psychotherapy supervision practices. The author explores their practice as a dramatherapist and how small objects can broaden the awareness of the supervisees own relationship patterns. Small objects helped to re-conceptualise the therapeutic dynamic using metaphor and make conscious parts of the supervisee experience they had been unaware.
    • The host revisited.

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby; Original music by Matt Le Mare; Directed by Katy Tozer (Buxton Fringe Festival 2018, 2018-07-12)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • The host#1

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (WeAreKunst Art Gallery, Belper, 2016-10-08)
    • The host#3

      Bird, Drew; Tozer, Katy; University of Derby; Le Mare, Matt; Baron, Chris (The Maypole Café Bar and Theatre, 2018-02-10)
      A darkly comic, fragmented tale with serious aspirations, no actors or scenery, and only one chair! This one-man show plays with the fine line between commitment and obsession; between something and nothing; between imagination and the empty space. Original music by Matt Le Mare and Chris Baron, music directed by Matt Le Mare. Directed by Katy Tozer
    • The host#4

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (European Federation of Dramatherapy 4th European Dramatherapy Conference: Borders in Action, Nürtingen, Germany., 2018-04-28)
      The performance is an ongoing solo performance that explores the borders between characters and their external and internal worlds. A host guides the audience through the performance introducing them to various characters and their worlds. A bride groom stands at the front of the church, an integrator attempts to squeeze out a password from a man bound to a chair, a cheerleader relentlessly practices her routine, an emaciated women is tied to a tree and a door waits to be opened. The external and internal world of the performer comes under close scrutiny as the host of the show attempts to pull the fragmented show together with no actors or scenery and only one chair. The performance exposes the borders of the characters rigid worlds and the transformation and energy that ensues when those world collide and elide. The performance explores the borders of the personal and autobiographical with the professional role of a Drama therapist and facilitator. The performer facilitates and guides an autobiographical performance that is informed by the research methodology known as Heuristic Inquiry. Using the characteristics of intuition and illumination the performer draws on personal material to deepen ones understanding of a Drama therapist and the importance of play in the therapeutic process. The borders between the story of the performer and the audience’s story are drawn closer together as the performance draws on mythological and existential themes. The performance approach breaks down the 4th wall, guiding the audience into a shared world and existence with the staged characters. The performance plays with the imagination and the borders between the seen and unseen and the energy that is created when separate worlds elide. Directed by Katy Tozer.
    • How can arts-based research in dramatic performance illuminate understanding of the therapeutic relationship?

      Bird, Drew; University of Derby (Intellect, 2019-10-01)
      This article explores how Heuristic Inquiry (HI), harnessed for arts-based research using solo performance, deepened the author’s understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The research explores the rehearsal and devising process of nine performances to explore barriers to a playful encounter with the audience and client using the myth of Psyche and Cupid. Themes of seeking approval, technique and shame are considered as potential obstacles to forging a co-creative therapeutic alliance.
    • How do hand therapists conservatively manage acute, closed mallet finger? A survey of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists.

      Cook, Samantha; Daniels, Nikki; Woodbridge, Sarah; Barnsley Hospital; University of Derby; Physiotherapy Department, Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, UK; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK; College of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Sage, 2016-08-13)
      Introduction Previous research concerning the conservative management of mallet finger has focused on splint application, with limited representation of supplementary rehabilitation and best practice. This research sought to investigate the practice and opinions of members of the British Association of Hand Therapists regarding their current treatment and to determine whether any specific exercise prescription or rehabilitation protocols are followed. Methods British Association of Hand Therapists members were contacted via e-mail and requested to complete an online survey. Thirty-five responses (5.7% response rate), 30 (4.8% response rate) of which were fully completed were obtained over the eight-week data collection period. The questionnaire consisted of 30 questions (20 quantitative and 10 qualitative) concerning therapists’ roles and condition management. Responses were analysed in terms of response frequencies, percentages and thematic text analysis. Results The results demonstrated current clinical practices in line with available best-evidenced practice. Conservative therapeutic management is diverse and varied. Therapists believe their role to be significant in optimising outcome success. Discussion Exercises and other interventions supplementary to splinting are commonly utilised in the therapeutic management of acute, closed mallet finger. This research found hand therapists implement a diverse range of clinical skills in order to optimise outcome success. Recommendations for best practice and further research are presented.
    • An internet survey of psychiatrists who have a particular interest in cognitive behavioural therapy: what is the place for the cognitive behavioural model in their role as a psychiatrist?

      Alfaraj, Ali Isa; Whitfield, Graeme; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2015-03-03)
      A survey of psychiatrists with a special interest in CBT was conducted by email correspondence to answer two main questions: ‘What are the uses and the usefulness of the cognitive behavioural model within the day-to-day practice of psychiatrists?’ and ‘What are the most important roles of the consultant medical psychotherapist who has specialized in CBT?’ Despite the constraints of a low response rate the results still reflected the views of 46 psychiatrists who were particularly experienced in the area of CBT. They reported that the cognitive behavioural model was useful in general psychiatric settings, in particular in the engagement of patients, improving client's insight, adherence to medications, and for trainee supervision. The responders reaffirmed previously held views about the role of the consultant medical psychotherapist (CBT), in particular the roles of the assessment and management of complex cases, of taking responsibility for patients with a combination of medical and psychological issues and of teaching CBT to psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. The challenges of translating CBT competencies into generic non-CBT psychiatric settings are discussed, with the important potential role of the medical psychotherapist in this respect. The key skill of formulating cases in secondary care is emphasized.
    • Interrogating women’s experience of ageing: reinforcing or challenging clichés?

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (2015-07)
      The “Representing Self—Representing Ageing” initiative has been funded by the ESRC as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing cross-council research programme. It has consisted of four projects with older women using participatory arts to enable women to articulate their experiences of ageing, and to create alternative images of ageing. Methods have included the use of art elicitation, photo-diaries, film-booths, directed photography, and phototherapy.
    • The introductory guide to art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; Coulter, A.; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (Routledge, 2014)
      Foreword by Professor Judy Rubin. Introduction. What is Art Therapy? On Experiential Learning. An Introduction to Art Therapy. Becoming an Art Therapy Practitioner. Teaching Art Therapy to Allied Health Professionals. Innovative Teaching Strategies. An Overview of Models of Art Therapy. The Role of the Image in Art Therapy & Intercultural Reflections. Working as an Art Therapist with Children. Working as an Art Therapist with Offenders. Art Therapy with Couples and Families. Group Work with Adults. Art Therapy and Co-therapy. Starting Supervision. Models of Supervision & Personal Therapy. International Perspectives. A Critical Glossary of Key Terms.
    • An investigation into first year diagnostic radiography students' preparedness to deal with ill service users in two UK universities

      Hyde, Emma; Strudwick, Ruth; University of Derby; University of Suffolk (Society of Radiographers, 2017-09-01)
      This article disseminated research that was undertaken at two UK universities to investigate the preparedness of first year students to deal with very ill service users. The research took a qualitative approach, using focus groups at both universities to collect data. The data was audio-recorded and transcribed, and then analysed using a thematic approach. The article discusses the issues which were identified by participants in the study, and makes recommendations for curriculum development to support future students.
    • Is there a role for simulation based education within conventional diagnostic radiography? A literature review

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-02-07)
      Simulation based education is advancing, but is there a role for it in Diagnostic Radiography? The aim of this literature review was to understand the use of simulation within conventional diagnostic radiography education to raise awareness of this pedagogical approach. Objectives were to identify the prevalence and stage of delivery in education; understand the variation of simulation and learning objectives informing its use; and review the perceptions of those using simulation in education and practice. The literature review used a systematic search strategy. Library Plus, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Medline and Google Scholar were reviewed resulting in 703 articles. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied with initial review of title and abstract resulting in 22 articles. Fifteen articles were selected following full text review. Simulation was used for both pre-and post-registration education. Themes included inter-professional education, use of computer software and improving patient/practitioner interactions. Increased confidence and understanding of professional roles were common outcomes. Simulation is a valuable pedagogical approach for diagnostic radiography education. Staff training and careful implementation of each stage is required to achieve desired learning outcomes.
    • An iterative run-to-run learning model to derive continuous brachial pressure estimates from arterial and venous lines during dialysis treatment

      Stewart, Jill; Stewart, Paul; Walker, Tom; Viramontes-Hörner, Daniela; Lucas, Bethany; White, Kelly; Taal, Maarten W.; Selby, Nicholas M.; Morris, Mel; University of Derby; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2020-11-28)
      Objective: Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring is not yet part of routine practice in renal dialysis units but could be a valuable tool in the detection and prevention of significant variations in patient blood pressure during treatment. Feasibility studies have delivered an initial validation of a method which utilises pressure sensors in the extra-corporeal dialysis circuit, without any direct contact with the person receiving treatment. Our main objective is to further develop this novel methodology from its current early development status to a continuous-time brachial artery pressure estimator. Methods: During an in vivo patient feasibility study with concurrent measurement validation by Finapres Nova experimental physiological measurement device, real-time continuous dialysis line pressures, and intermittent occluding arm cuff pressure data were collected over the entire period of (typically 4-hour) dialysis treatments. There was found to be an underlying quasi-linear relationship between arterial line and brachial pressure measurements which supported the development of a mathematical function to describe the relationship between arterial dialysis line pressure and brachial artery BP. However, unmodelled non-linearities, dynamics and time-varying parameters present challenges to the development of an accurate BP estimation system. In this paper, we start to address the problem of physiological parameter time variance by novel application of an iterative learning run-to-run modelling methodology originally developed for process control engineering applications to a parameterised BP model. Results: The iterative run-to-run learning methodology was applied to the real-time data measured during an observational study in 9 patients, supporting subsequent development of an adaptive real-time BP estimator. Tracking of patient BP is analysed for all the subjects in our patient study, supported only by intermittent updates from BP cuff measurements. Conclusion: The methodology and associated technology is shown to be capable of tracking patient BP noninvasively via arterial line pressure measurement during complete 4-hour treatment sessions. A robust and tractable method is demonstrated, and future refinements to the approach are defined.
    • Learning as a creative and developmental process in higher education: A therapeutic arts approach and its wider application.

      Taylor, Judie; Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      Much has been written about the importance of creativity in learning and education over the last few decades. This unique book extends beyond the usual focus on implementing creative methods in learning, teaching and assessing within higher education, to an examination of creativity as central to a learning process which is transformational for the student. More specifically, Learning as a Creative and Developmental Process in Higher Education examines the importance of a facilitative tutor-student relationship and environment which contextualise this creative process of teaching and learning.  Bringing together unique teaching and learning approaches developed by experienced academics, this book discusses a number of complex issues, including approaches to an understanding of the student’s self-concept as learner; the nature of the curriculum; the potential of metaphor and creativity; and a multi-modal approach to learning and teaching. Contributions to the book also examine some of the challenges and tensions of such an approach within the context of arts-based subjects in higher education institutions. Using a unique and coherent thematic structure that is based upon the student journey as a transformational process, this book provides a new way of understanding the student journey through higher education.  Including an examination of the parallels between educational and arts education and arts therapies disciplines, this book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students involved in the arts and the arts therapies, as well as those studying creativity in teaching and learning in higher education. It should be of particular interest to those involved in the teaching and training of teachers and lecturers in higher education.
    • Learning imaginatively in higher education

      Jinks, Gavin; University of Derby (Human Givens Publishing, 2017-06-01)
    • Learning to hope and hoping to learn: a critical examination of young refugees and formal education in the UK.

      Williams, Simon; Council of Europe (Council of Europe, 2018-12)
      This chapter examines the multi-dimensional complexities affecting refugee children’s identities and aspirations in the UK whilst navigating the education system. It debates the current language used around new arrivals and how they are labelled with a negative public perception that is endorsed by the media and politicians, to instil moral panic for political gain. It will critically analyse the idea of hope and the affect it has on identity and wellbeing. In particular, the argument is made that refugee children and their families have hope for their new futures and often that hope is crushed, when it should be nurtured. It questions whether the current education system helps develop hope and inclusion for new arrivals or enforces the media and political stereotyping, and what role Youth and Community work plays in supporting, developing and nurturing hope in a hopeless environment. This chapter critically examines the current definitions of refugees examining both the legal and social definition of refugees and how these impact on identities. It will argue that labelling provides a barrier to full engagement and integration of new arrivals in their new societies, schools and social spaces. It will debate about integration through education and how this impacts on the complexities of new arrivals. It will debate that a racist society exists and continues to provide a judgement basis for new arrivals and their treatment. It will briefly cover ‘Rights’ to education and how the idea of hope is embedded in these rights, but yet are contested by policy, marketization of schools and detention centres. It will demonstrate how schools play a vital role in young people’s lives, but also in the role of families as places of hope, by provide social networking, education and places of cultural learning. It will then debate how this is experienced by new arrivals and if schools encourage cohesion or assimilation. It will debate the ability of schools to cope, in current circumstances and in light of marketization, with new arrivals and how this has affected schools abilities to cope with a diverse intake of students and different times of the year. The chapter offers a critique of the injustice for new arrivals both within macro and micro structural levels of education. It considers the impact of Orientalism and the development of the ‘other’ which is to be used in media and political rhetoric; Colonialism which continues to define refugees' identities today and Structuration as a form of enabling hope. However these will be contrasted with the power of individuals in creating change to develop hope and the barriers that are faced by new arrivals. It argues that in most cases informal education is much better at helping new arrivals learn than formal education and the great need for change at national, social policy, organisational and practice levels. The later part of the chapter will be a critical examination of the skills of youth and community workers and how they can respond to issues raised in the chapter, using informal education to develop and enhance hope with new arrivals. It will critically examine issues such as language barriers; safety and the effect on building relationships; place and its relationship with identity; and radical working with new arrivals debating that Youth and Community Workers need to be involved on all levels: Face to face, management, local and national policy making; to create spaces of hope for new arrivals. The chapter will use the voice of young people in current academic literature and experience of my own work with new arrivals in Derby, UK. The conclusion is that there must be a radical approach taken by youth and community workers, to provide critical space, for voices to be heard, for new arrivals to be recognised as valuable not as trouble makers and leading to creative change
    • Liminality in higher education – gaps and moments of uncertainty as legitimate learning spaces.

      Holmwood, Clive; Scales, Pete; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-10-25)
      Higher Education, learning and teaching philosophy is beginning to acknowledge that programmes crammed full of top down knowledge (Fox & Radloff 1999) are not the best way for teachers to teach or students to learn. Therefore, academically dense lectures and programmes packed with knowledge and information might not be conducive to student learning in the ‘google’ era, when information is readily available at the click of a button. With ideas such as the flipped classroom (Tucker 2012), we are beginning to consider that students should play a greater role in the teaching and learning process and that they be given new, evolving and appropriate spaces in the curriculum in which to do that. In this chapter, the notion of liminal spaces, gaps and moments of uncertainty within programmes of study, and threshold concepts (Meyer and Land, 2003) will be considered. This is a relatively new idea in Higher Education, which focuses on shifts in thinking and learning within the context of liminal spaces. Pete Scales brings many years of HE experience, whilst Clive Holmwood shares his anthropological understanding of space from a therapist’s perspective. Together they begin to consider the legitimate importance of gaps and spaces in the teaching curriculum; suggesting that these ambiguous spaces are where ‘deep learning’ (Biggs & Tang 2011) can potentially take place.
    • Lost in translation? Inter-cultural exchange in art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby; Health & Social Care Research Centre (Charles C. Thomas Publishers, 2015)
      This exciting text is a comprehensive work that examines the use of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama in different cultures and with diverse client populations. The editors’ primary purpose is to explore how the creative therapies can be implemented in diverse cultures and in different countries. Renowned, well-credentialed, and professional creative arts therapists in the areas of art, play, music, dance/movement, and drama helped write this collection. Examples include the use of art in working with refugee children in Australia and with Chinese-American children; shared experiences in using dance and movement with Arabic women in Jerusalem, indigenous Inner Mongolia, and with survivors of torture. Other chapters offer stories of using drama in the Netherlands, music and other creative arts in China, play therapy in Appalachia and with different races. Additionally, there are chapters on working with children with learning disabilities as well as the use of creative arts in supervision. Some of the chapters are beautifully complimented with photographs of client works of art or play. The text provides a rich tapestry on how the creative therapies can be used across cultures for issues such as depression and trauma to name a few. Of special interest are the chapters on supervision. Not only a tool for creative art therapists, this informative book will be of special interest to educators, students, therapists, as well as people working in other parts of the world or with culturally diverse clients.