• “Age is just a number, init?”: Interrogating perceptions of age and women within social gerontology

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-25)
      The article discusses social gerontology and mentions age and women. Topics discussed include social relations, self-identity and ageing. Other topics which includes women's bodies, menopause and feminism are also discussed. Ethnography, marginalization and sexual attraction towards women are also mentioned.
    • Art therapy theories: A critical introduction

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2015)
      Art therapists work with a range of distinct philosophical and theoretical underpinnings, but as yet there has been no single book to offer an overview of these theories. Art Therapy Theories provides an introductory, non-partisan overview of art therapy theories outlining the following therapy approaches: Cognitive Behavioural Art Therapy Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Psychoanalytical (Freudian) Art Therapy Analytical (Jungian) Art Therapy Gestalt Art Therapy Person-Centred or ‘Rogerian’ Art Therapy Mindfulness Art Therapy Integrative Art Therapy (the Group-Interactive Model) Feminist Art Therapy Art Therapy as Social Action Art Therapy as a Research Tool Each chapter provides a non-judgemental, yet analytical, synopsis of each approach. No detailed knowledge is necessary to understand the different approaches, as the book explains them in clear and concise English. Difficult terms and concepts are explained as they arise, and a glossary of terms is also provided. Art Therapy Theories is aimed at trainee art therapists who need to demonstrate that they have a grasp of theory, as well as a sense of how the theory can translate into practice. It will also appeal to seasoned therapists, counsellors and to a wide range of professionals in the mental health field.
    • The Birth Project: Using the Arts to explore birth. Interim report

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-10)
      The aim of this study was to use the arts to interrogate birth discourses, to challenge embedded assumptions, and in this process, to stimulate mutual recovery between all those who experience and are affected by birth. The research questions are: • What role might arts engagement have to play in ante-natal and post-natal care? • To what extent are hospital practices, that are iatrogenic in nature, implicated in post-natal distress? • To what extent is ‘mutual recovery’ possible through engagement with the arts, and if so, to establish what form this may take? • What, in particular, does an arts-based approach offer in exploring birth experiences and the transition to motherhood?
    • Gender representation, power and identity in mental health and art therapy.

      Hogan, Susan; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-14)
    • The introductory guide to art therapy

      Hogan, Susan; Coulter, A.; University of Derby,; College of Health & Social Care Research Centre (Routledge, 2014)
      Foreword by Professor Judy Rubin. Introduction. What is Art Therapy? On Experiential Learning. An Introduction to Art Therapy. Becoming an Art Therapy Practitioner. Teaching Art Therapy to Allied Health Professionals. Innovative Teaching Strategies. An Overview of Models of Art Therapy. The Role of the Image in Art Therapy & Intercultural Reflections. Working as an Art Therapist with Children. Working as an Art Therapist with Offenders. Art Therapy with Couples and Families. Group Work with Adults. Art Therapy and Co-therapy. Starting Supervision. Models of Supervision & Personal Therapy. International Perspectives. A Critical Glossary of Key Terms.
    • Unpacking gender in art therapy: The elephant at the art therapy easel

      Hogan, Susan; Cornish, Shelagh; University of Derby,; Health & Social Care Research Centre (2014-10-28)
      A national survey of registered art therapists in Britain was undertaken to create both quantitative and qualitative data about how ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation influence the therapeutic relationship. A tick-box scale was used alongside more open questions. This article presents the initial findings of the research and will focus on gender issues in the art therapy relationship; it will elucidate some of the ways in which art therapists conceptualise gender in the therapeutic alliance. The research indicates that the overwhelming majority of art therapists think that their own gender is very important to the therapeutic encounter. The personal preference of the client, personal history and presenting issues, which may be gender related, are highlighted by both male and female respondents. Art therapists seek to be aware and non-judgemental regarding gender. An interesting finding highlights that the transference gender might not correspond to the biological sex, suggesting that some art therapists have a ‘mobile’ understanding of gender, and are keen not to foreclose conceptual possibilities because of gender. This would also seem to indicate a permeation of postmodernist ideas into art therapy thinking.
    • The value of art therapy in antenatal and postnatal care: A brief literature review with recommendations for future research

      Hogan, Susan; Sheffield, David; Woodward, Amelia; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2017-09-01)
      There is a very small body of literature addressing the use of the arts or art therapy in antenatal and post-natal care, and much of it is qualitative, including some rich and complex data which is worthy of discussion and consideration. Overall, it points to a promising use of supportive and therapeutic arts in this area. This article presents some background on the use of the arts specifically focusing on post-natal depression and birth trauma. It then moves on to present a brief survey of literature in the field, followed by some further reflections and discussion about further research needed to establish clinical utility and economic viability.