• Value co-creation and co-destruction: considerations of spa servicescapes

      Buxton, Louise; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-01-19)
      Spas are places that enable mind, body and spiritual harmony, and are therefore inextricably linked to the pursuit of health and wellbeing, as one of the most prominent forms of wellness tourism. Recent growth in the global spa industry is fuelled by increasing consumer interest in the pursuit of wellness. Concepts within the spa industry remain largely unexplored, thus, this conceptual paper aims to progress our understanding by considering opportunities for value co-creation and co-destruction in a spa context. In doing this, the paper unpacks the concept of the servicescape, explores the concept of authenticity and argues that understanding the consumption and production of experiences is central to understanding the creation of value in spa service settings.
    • Virtual cultural tourism: six pillars of VCT using co-creation, value exchange and exchange value

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby, University of Pannonia (2016-02)
      This paper examines antecedents to the successful use of Virtual Cultural Tourism and the ways in which virtual realities can add value to Cultural Tourism offers. Success can be seen to derive from the deeper understanding of consumers’ preferences and motivations to engage with Virtual Cultural Tourism. It is also necessary to see these initiatives from the perspective of multiple stakeholders: the armchair traveller, the frequent flyer and the service provider at destinations. The latter include public sector providers such as park site managers, museum curators, interpretation and information services for tourism as well as the private sector developers.
    • The vision and the mission of the International Journal of Spa and Wellness

      Clarke, Alan; azara, Iride; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2018-06-05)
    • Visitor satisfaction and place attachment in national parks

      Smith, L. D. G; Kneebone, S. C.; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 01/08/2014)
      This study examines the relationships between visitor satisfaction and place attachment. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test competing models of visitor satisfaction and place attachment represented as a (i) unidimensional, (ii) first-order, and (iii) second-order factor. Data were collected from a sample of 525 visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, in the state of Ontario, Canada. Results indicate visitor satisfaction is a better predictor of place attachment as a second-order construct. Findings are discussed with respect to their applied and theoretical relevance. Practical applications of the study include strategies aimed at achieving optimum visitor satisfaction and promoting place attachment in national parks.
    • Visitors' experience, place attachment and sustainable behaviour at cultural heritage sites: a conceptual framework

      Buonincontri, P; Marasco, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (MDPI, 26/06/2017)
      Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.
    • Volunteers: their role in the management of the visitor and pilgrimage experience

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (2014)
      This research acknowledges the strong customer-relationship management achievements of a Cathedral located in Derby in the Midlands of England. In conjunction with the clergy and volunteers, the researcher identifies, through visitor data capture and analysis of a customer satisfaction survey and interviews with key stakeholders, that high levels of satisfied visitors and volunteers exist. Using a recognised expectations and perceptions approach driven by the service quality model (SERVQUAL) and elaborated by literature, the researcher offers recommendations to maintain customer and volunteer satisfaction (Bitner et al., 1997; Atilgan et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2000). These recommendations include a reliable reward system generated for volunteers, some compelling narratives for sacred and secular pilgrims, relevant displays and performance and appropriate resource allocation. The exceptional service and experience model is derived from an analysis of data from visitor surveys conducted by the Cathedral’s volunteer greeters and guides over the course of a year. In addition to delivering outcomes on the importance attached to expected and perceived service quality attributes, the report concludes by suggesting factors to help maintain a low-cost strategy for sites of pilgrimage and worship that inform future management. As a result of the volunteers and visitor strategy, this Cathedral benefits from delivering a low cost visitor-friendly invitation, welcome and experience and is able to use core human resources to support the mission and share faith and identity in a continuously refreshed manner. Recommendations for marketing the Cathedral, for managing and inspiring volunteers and for recruitment of volunteers and customer-relationship management are offered. Key
    • What can a graduate do for you?

      Buxton, Louise; Baker, Lorraine; University of Derby (2018-05-21)
    • What is a learning town? Reflections on the experience at Wirksworth.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (The University of Naples Federico II, 2017-12-30)
      This paper explores the legacy of regeneration project work and knowledge management and transfer as a result of intervention through a charity designed to support new business opportunities, specifically in arts and entertainment, tourism, skills development and training. As part of the University of Derby’s own work-related learning and problem-based learning, a project team was assigned to work alongside the charity ‘New Opportunities in Wirksworth!’ (NOW!). A participant observation, action research approach has been used to elicit and analyse the knowledge transfer, both explicit and implicit. Staff and students from the University of Derby have been contracted to research tourism development specifically in festival supply and demand, the attractiveness of the destination and its key features the market, mining heritage and volunteer railway. Staff and students also committed to an events strategy, marketing the destination and finance for start-ups. The University is engaged in tacit and explicit knowledge transfers. Key stakeholders have reflected on a decade of achievements and both fails and success stories. Agendas for the future have been identified and the project NOW! Has a legacy of both tacit and explicit knowledge for the benefit of other communities. There is an ongoing desire to explore how both public and private sectors can benefit from knowledge sharing and to benefit ongoing problem-based learning in education and training.
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Batchelor, Lauren; Loynes, Tony; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-29)
      The World Health Organisation (WHO) [(2018). The top ten causes of death. http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top10-causes-of-death] highlights that 12.2 million people die globally from non-communicable diseases while still in work. The effect of poor work and lifestyle habits on health is directing some of the responsibility for changing behaviours to employers, through the development of workplace wellness programmes [Baker (2017). Obesity statistics. House of Commons Library]. However, literature reveals an important challenge with workplace wellness programmes, namely, the measurement of their success to identify return on investment (ROI). Furthermore, the vast number of employers are reluctant to implement anything that costs money without knowing that it will be successful [Mattke et al. 2013. Workplace wellness programs study (1st ed.). Rand Corporation]. A challenge is therefore presented, in identifying appropriate measures of success for workplace wellness programmes, which can be presented in order to validate investment in them. This paper emphasises the need to develop a measurement tool which employs both quantitative and qualitative measures, to demonstrate the success in both financial and human terms, furthermore it asserts that a measurement tool could provide data which is required to secure investment from employers in workplace wellness programmes (Mattke et al. 2013) and facilitate benchmarking of similar organisation in terms of workplace wellness outcomes [Emkjer (2013). Focus On… Employee Health, Moving the Needle on Employee Wellness: The Human Factor. Employee Benefits Plan Review Dec 2013].
    • Workplace wellness: measuring the success

      Buxton, Louise; Loynes, Tony; Batchelor, Lauren; University of Derby (2018-06-28)
    • Worship & sightseeing: building a partnership approach to a ministry of welcome

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby; University of Pannonia (2013)
      This paper explores diverse opportunities for partnerships between the sacred and secular at religious sites. It identifies ways in which tourism suppliers can work collaboratively with sacred sites to enable sites to meet the demands of contemporary secular and sacred stakeholders. In the review of contemporary literature we consider supply and demand issues, site management, key components of partnership, ecumenical co-creation resources, cost-benefit and marketing needs. The paper is predicated on the provision of information and interpretation services for guidance, and development of all of these services. Methodologically, a participant observation approach was employed to confirm that tourism fits the strategic intent of religious leaders. We consider that partnership at a national, diocesan and parish level is an important part in effective tourism development. Elements of community involvement; capacity building and in- community development through engaging stakeholders are discussed. The balance achieved between stakeholders is important, and in our context the balance between local government and the tourism industry, and between active partners and the passive policy community, reflects the aims of the sacred and the private sector key partners, and the wider social capacity building aspects of community development agendas and government.
    • Worship & sightseeing: building a partnership approach to a ministry of welcome

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby, University of Pannonia (2013)
      This paper explores diverse opportunities for partnerships between the sacred and secular at religious sites. It identifies ways in which tourism suppliers can work collaboratively with sacred sites to enable sites to meet the demands of contemporary secular and sacred stakeholders. In the review of contemporary literature we consider supply and demand issues, site management, key components of partnership, ecumenical co-creation resources, cost-benefit and marketing needs. The paper is predicated on the provision of information and interpretation services for guidance, and development of all of these services. Methodologically, a participant observation approach was employed to confirm that tourism fits the strategic intent of religious leaders. We consider that partnership at a national, diocesan and parish level is an important part in effective tourism development. Elements of community involvement; capacity building and in-community development through engaging stakeholders are discussed. The balance achieved between stakeholders is important, and in our context the balance between local government and the tourism industry, and between active partners and the passive policy community, reflects the aims of the sacred and the private sector key partners, and the wider social capacity building aspects of community development agendas and government.