• Reconfiguring the role of local cultural intermediaries in the tourist encounter

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (University of Algarve, 2013-10-04)
    • Reflecting on perceptions of local communities and visitors: Sustainable heritage leisure and tourism

      Spring, Charles; Wakefield, Lisa; University of Derby (Palgrave McMillan, 2020-06-25)
      The two aspects of Positive Sociology; those of psychology and sociology indicate that communities would prefer that they are engaged and involved in their local leisure activities. Visitors gain satisfaction from experiences they are engaged in. Understanding what these would be is important to destinations. Buxton is undertaking a major regeneration project at the Crescent, a hotel complex with ancillary buildings one of which is the Pump Room. The purpose of research undertaken by students, overseen by academics and members of staff from Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa; was to gain an insight into visitor and community perceptions of Buxton, The Crescent Hotel and The Pump Room. A sustainable use could then be determined for the Pump Room, which has a rich history of visitor use prior to its closure in the 1990’s. Qualitative research was carried out in order to gain a deeper insight into the quality of the community and visitor experience. Quantitative research was used to capture and portray demographics. Data was analysed comparing visitor and community expectations and perceptions of Buxton. Key themes emerging suggest that both visitor and community perceptions and expectations were very similar. The majority of visitors choose Buxton for heritage and culture or the scenery and both groups agreed the most appealing aspects of the Crescent and towns spa heritage, were the history, architecture, outdoor environment and surrounding beauty. Themes regarding future use of the Pump Room gave conflicting opinions. The most common response for both visitors and residents was a tea room/café/restaurant in keeping with the 5* Crescent Hotel. Another theme, which emerged from visitors, was for an entertainment venue. It could be argued that residents and visitors need a better understanding of the Pump Room in order to have a better vision of how it can best be adapted and restored. The authors of this article would suggest that further research is needed with both residents and visitors.
    • Review of survey methods in events management research

      Fletcher, Richard; Bostock, James; University of Derby; De Montfort University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019)
      Questionnaire-based surveys are a common data collection tool in events research as established by earlier reviews of methods within the literature. This paper examines and critiques the historic development, current position, gaps in knowledge and future implications for survey-based research. Some diversity is found within survey-based research, however the majority was carried out: as a single method (86%), in physical proximity to the event (67%), during the event (49%), using paper-based forms (65%), designed for self-completion (94%). The event types most commonly targeted were: Sports (43%) Festivals & Celebrations (20%) and Music (12%). The stakeholders targeted were: Audiences (54%), Non-participants (16%) and Managers (12%). Sampling methods, where stated, were likely to be random (23%) or convenience based (22%). Despite the predominance of this data collection tool, numerous areas are ideally in need of further understanding and experimentation. Priorities for future survey-based research are in using mixed methods, multiple surveys, electronic surveys, more deliberate approaches to sampling overall; specifically sampling both before and after events. Targeting stakeholders other than audiences and covering a broader range of events may also be desirable. Emerging technologies and a typology of survey-based research are discussed. The use of survey-based research by policy makers and funders is discussed under the label of ‘operationalised knowledge management’.
    • Revisiting Value Co-creation and Co-destruction in Tourism

      Cavagnaro, Elena; Michopoulou, Eleni; Pappas, Nikolaos; NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Informa UK Limited, 2021-03-05)
      As COVID-19 has shown in a way unimaginable before it hit, tourism is susceptible to uncertainty and incidents that can directly impact the supply and demand of its discretionary products and services. Before the pandemic, consensus had been reached among practitioners and academics that consumer experience is more important than ever for enterprises as well as destinations, as the sector had become globalized, reached maturity and became highly competitive. Tourism came to a grinding halt due to the pandemic and recovery may take years. Still, the pathway to success (or failure) lies on the overall satisfaction of visitors and tourists, which heavily depends on perceived value; a concept that can be co-created or co-destroyed by the very interaction between all social actors and stakeholders involved. Value creation or destruction is critical not just for traditional supply of and demand for, but also for an array of actors across value and distribution chains (including for example staff and intermediaries across the networks). The special issue’s aim was to assist the better understanding of value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism development by bringing together different perspectives and disciplines. Judging from the diversity of the theoretical perspectives of the articles collected in this issue and the richness of the presented findings the special issue has indeed achieved its aim. Yet some real trends could be distinguished: the relevance of online communication and information; the importance of interpersonal encounters and social interaction for value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism; and the challenges in the design and delivery process of co-created experiences.
    • The role of culture on online search behaviour: A comparative study between British and Chinese travellers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Moisa, Delia; University of Derby; Manchester Metropolitan University (Springer International Publishing, 2016-01-23)
      This study explores the role of culture and its impacts on travellers’ online information search behaviour. The study is focused on two culturally diametric countries: United Kingdom and China (Hofstede, Psychology and Culture, 2011) and they have been selected as case studies, representing values from the Western and the Asian cultures. The research adopted a qualitative approach, and data was collected through interviews in order to enhance the understanding on the subject studied. Findings indicate that culture influences considerably the travellers’ behaviour in the online environment, and as a result of this influence, different behavioural patterns between the British and the Chinese travellers emerged. Conclusions discuss the implications for marketers aiming at the British and the Chinese tourists, and they highlight the need to adopt different strategies in designing and promoting their tourism products for these two particular markets
    • Role of ethnic cultural events to build an authentic destination image

      Shabnam, S; Choudhury, A; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 21/12/2018)
      Local festivals are becoming increasingly important tourist attractions for the sophisticated tourist in quest of new authentic experiences (Ramkissoon and Uysal, 2014; Ramkissoon, 2015, 2016). The extent to which local festivals can grow as a point of attraction for international tourists while ful?lling their social and cultural roles at the national level is an issue of immense importance to social and cultural policymakers and destination marketers. This chapter explores the local festival of ‘Pohela Boishakh’, which is the celebration of the Bengali New Year. It is recognised by UNESCO as ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity’ and identified as the largest national event of Bangladesh, a developing economy with crucial geo-political importance in the South Asian region, with substantial economic promises for the local population (UNESCO, 2016). This chapter draws on Getz et al. (2006)’s framework to explore festival stakeholder relationships, especially resource dependency issues, with a view to advancing the application of stakeholder theory to festival tourism, festival management and marketing in an integrated manner. Implications for tourism and event management along with theoretical advances are discussed with suggestions for future research in the field.
    • Samadhi spa & wellness retreat

      Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 23/08/2013)
    • Sector-focused approach to business events in Manchester

      Vokacova, Zuzana; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
    • Selling the total spa product

      Buxton, Louise; University of Derby (Goodfellow Publishers, 2016-11-30)
      Retail sales can contribute significantly to a spa’s revenue, however, many spas do not realise their full retail potential. This chapter presents strategies to maximise retail sales, including: brand selection, brand ambassadors, incentives, training, retail design and visual merchandising to provide a tool kit for success. Consideration is also given to the importance of integrating retail throughout the entire customer journey. A case study is presented at the end of the chapter to encourage the application of knowledge. Selling experiences is seen as the principal function of a spa (Wuttle and Cohen, 2008), nevertheless, retail and other sales such as up-selling and link selling can all make significant contributions to a spa’s revenue. In exploring approaches to selling, the benefits of, and barriers to, selling are presented as well as strategies to maximise sales. The chapter is therefore essentially a more practically based one, but needs to be read in conjunction with the chapters on consumer behaviour, guest service and journey and marketing spas.
    • Small cities with big dreams: creative placemaking and branding strategies

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-12)
    • Social Bonding and Public Trust/Distrust in COVID-19 Vaccines

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, College of Business, Law, & Social Sciences, Derby Business School; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (MDPI AG, 2021-09-14)
      COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has been a growing concern. The pandemic has proved to be very complicated with the mutated virus. The Delta variant is contributing to a surge of cases across the globe. Vaccine hesitancy can be socially contagious, requiring more stringent efforts from policy makers and health professionals in promoting vaccine uptake. Some evidence shows that vaccine acceptance appears to have played an integral role in successfully controlling the pandemic. Vaccination acceptance, however, demands that the public has a good understanding of the vaccine’s benefits in promoting healthier societies and people’s quality of life. Unclear COVID-19 vaccine information can lead to distrust in vaccines and vaccine hesitancy. It is of paramount importance to communicate clear and unbiased vaccine information to the public to encourage vaccine uptake. Word of mouth communication remains important to further promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake in the community. This short paper discusses the role of social bonds and public trust/distrust and word of mouth communication in vaccine decision making.
    • Social customer relationship management: A customer perspective

      Dewnarain, Senika; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Mavondo, Felix; University of Derby; Curtin Mauritius, Charles Telfair Campus, Mauritius; Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Taylor & Francis, 2021-04-13)
      The availability of many social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and online review sites such as Trip Advisor has led to the emergence of a new concept known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. This is defined as a business strategy of engaging customers through social media with the goal of building trust and brand loyalty (Greenberg, 2010; Li et al., 2020; Rita & Moro, 2018), SCRM provides traditional customer relationship management for online customers by shifting the focus from a transactional outlook to one that centers on customer experiences (Dewnarain et al., 2019a; Sigala, 2018; Touni et al., 10 2020; Zhang et al., 2019).
    • Social customer relationship management: an integrated conceptual framework

      Dewnarain, S; Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 15/10/2018)
      In recent years, the concept of customer relationship management (CRM) has undergone a major change from being a strategy that focused solely on establishing financial bonds with customers to one that promotes both transactional and interactional relationships with customers. This has given rise to a new form of CRM which is known as social customer relationship management (SCRM) or CRM 2.0. Hence, this study develops and proposes a conceptual model to address relationships between customer relationship management, social media technologies, customer engagement, positive word of mouth and brand loyalty. This paper brings significant contributions to hospitality CRM literature and marketing communication theory. It serves as a reference for hospitality practitioners who can derive insights on the potential economic advantage such as brand loyalty and consumer behaviour benefits in the form of positive word of mouth which can result from the effective implementation of a SCRM strategy.
    • Social involvement and park citizenship as moderators for quality-of-life in a national park

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F; Uysal, M. S.; Monash University (Taylor and Francis, 17/08/2017)
      This paper contributes to the advancement of quality-of-life research in tourism by examining complex relationships involving direct, mediated, moderated and moderated mediation relationships among the antecedents to quality-of-life. Using a sample of 222 repeat visitors in an Australian national park, the findings indicate positive significant effects of (1) place satisfaction on quality-of-life; (2) place satisfaction on place attachment; (3) place attachment on quality-of-life; (4) park citizenship on place attachment. The findings further support that (5) place attachment mediates the relationship between place satisfaction and quality-of-life; (6) social involvement moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (7) park citizenship moderates the relationship between place satisfaction and place attachment; (8) social involvement moderates the relationship between place attachment and quality-of-life; (9) social involvement moderates the indirect effect of place satisfaction on quality-of-life. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Park managers, for example, need to promote on-site marketing and post-visit communication/interpretation, encouraging repeat visits and behavioural change. Message delivery needs to promote a sense of belonging to the park with personal meaning, creating place distinctiveness. Personal actions to promote include signing petitions supporting the park's biodiversity, and other resources, and volunteering to participate in meetings and other direct actions.
    • Spa services and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience; the case study of Jersey, Channel Islands.

      Iliuta, Maria-Alexandra; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby; University of Derby, Derby, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-03-23)
      This paper explores the feasibility of developing spa and wellness activities within the surf tourism experience in Jersey (Channel Islands) from the surf traveller’s perspective. Using this worldview, we evaluate a surf tourism offer in Jersey. Through an analysis of the lifestyle and attitudes of today’s surf traveller, we offer preliminary suggestions to marketers and surf lodge owners to capitalise on this unique target market. The conceptual position, that we term Swellness, refers to the perceived wellness dimensions and benefits of surfing. We identify that spa and wellness elements are feasible add-ons for surf product development. The study has also revealed an openness towards other wellness-related concepts, such as Surf Set Fitness or man­made wave surfing parks. Furthermore, the research has shown that wellness and personal responsibility for well-being are part of a surf subculture.
    • Spa tourism

      Azara, Iride; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (Routledge, 2012-01-01)
    • Sport tourists’ preferred event attributes and motives: a case of Sepak Takraw, Malaysia

      Zarei, Azadeh; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Artic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Sage, 2020-04-29)
      This study investigates differences in motives, event attributes, and information sources, which influenced sport tourists’ decision and attendance at the Sepak Takraw event in Malaysia. Data were collected from 224 domestic sports tourists and 92 foreign sports tourists. Findings show that domestic and foreign sports tourists significantly differed in their motives and preferred event attributes. Domestic sports tourists indicate using mass communication items in their decision making to attend the event. Social networking was the most important information source for foreign sports tourists. Practical implications for local sports tourism marketers within small-scale sports events in Malaysia are discussed.
    • The stakeholder sandwich - a new stakeholder analysis model for events and festivals

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Wallace, Kevin; University of Derby (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019-03-21)
      The significance of stakeholders in the festival and events sector is demonstrated in the literature and is a growing area of interest. The application of conventional stakeholder theory to this sector has proved to be problematic and new models developed as alternatives. Since the 1980s a number of matrices and models have been established to identify and categorise stakeholders, but limitations have been exposed in the context of festival and events research. This study set out to explore the use of established stakeholder models for their usefulness and effectiveness in the sector, consider alternative models and to empirically examine a proposed alternative. To do so, a multi-phased qualitative methodology was used. Results indicated that none of the conventional or proposed sector specific models were in common usage by sector professionals but did confirm that Ed Freeman’s founding stakeholder definition of 1984 continues to be valid and hold true. The framework for a new conceptual test model was developed and then refined to produce the Stakeholder Sandwich Model for testing on a live event. This model proved to be effective in identifying and mapping a wide range of stakeholders with flexibility and fluidity, overcoming the limitations of both established conventional models and more recent sector-specific typographies. This model has significant potential for application in the festival and events sector, with implications for both researchers and event practitioners.
    • Steps forward: the journey of wellness education in the UK

      Buxton, Louise; Spring, Charles; University of Derby (2018-06-19)