• New Age visitors and the tourism industry.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (Dublin Institute of Technology, 2018-12-31)
      This conceptual paper establishes a framework for socially constructed research activity to help gauge the intention of travellers in more-developed countries (MDC) of the wealthy and largely affluent North to undertake forms of continuing personal and professional development (CPD) through their travel experiences. Human physiological needs have in large already been achieved for many in more developed countries and exceeded in terms of nourishment and entertainment. Humans are social and societal creatures and in need of realisation of their spiritual, intellectual and societal choices and selections. New spiritual values are threatened by monetarism, by an ‘enveloping outside world’, as Giddens terms it (Giddens, 1991; Giddens, 1994). We must look to the South for inspiration, for restoration of group values and creation of acceptable norms that define society and are elemental in the construction of society from the bottom up.
    • A non- conference review: a note on conferences that never were, those that may be and those that will be in 2021

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-02)
      A non-traditional conference review offering a synthetic update on the latest academic and industry conference developments in the areas of wellness and wellbeing as well as some thoughts on what future conferences may look like in the near and long term future.
    • Nutritional benefits of local meat produce

      Cseh, Leonard; Close, Hariett; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2012-05-09)
    • Online tourism information and tourist behavior: a structural equation modeling analysis based on a self-administered survey

      Majeed, Salman; Zhou, Zhimin; Lu, Changbao; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, China; University of Derby; Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa (Frontiers in Psychology, 2020-04-21)
      This study presents the interacting phenomena of perceptions of tourist destination online content (TDOC) and tourists’ behavioral intentions with a mediating role of tourists’ satisfaction, which is as yet under-explored in hospitality and tourism research. A model based on three main constructs, namely TDOC (with sub-constructs of online information quality and user-friendly accessibility), satisfaction, and tourists’ behavioral intentions [with sub-constructs of intentions to visit a tourist destination and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)], is presented to determine the growth of tourism business with the internet. Data were collected via a questionnaire-based survey from 413 tourists staying at hotels in Lahore city in Pakistan. Partial least square structural equation modeling was used to statistically analyze the gathered data. The findings indicate that tourists’ perceptions of TDOC directly influence their behavioral intentions, while tourists’ satisfaction exerts a mediating influence between tourists’ perceptions of TDOC and their behavioral intentions. Taking advantage of an economical and widespread online environment, destination marketing organizations could attract more tourists by fostering confidence in TDOC and positive eWOM to remain competitive in the long run. Important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
    • Perceived social impacts of tourism and quality-of-life: A new conceptual model

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, College of Business, Law, & Social Sciences, Derby Business School; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (Taylor & Francis, 2020-12-23)
      Residents’ overall well-being and quality-of-life require a deeper understanding of their perceived social impacts of tourism to determine appropriate management strategies to promote behaviours in support of tourism development. Aligning with the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development, this paper proposes a new framework for residents’ quality-of-life. Bringing together multi-disciplinary evidence from environmental, social and cognitive psychology, political science and tourism, this study critically examines how residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust can make them become more place attached and protect their tourism resources. The framework proposes that residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism exerts a direct influence on residents’ interpersonal trust. It further posits that residents’ perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust exert a direct influence on residents’ place attachment. The proposed model further considers place attachment to exert a direct influence on residents’ pro-social and pro-environmental behavioural intentions. Pro-social behaviour is proposed to influence pro-environmental behaviour. Further pro-social and pro-environmental behaviors are proposed to influence residents’ support for tourism development. The framework then considers residents’ support for tourism development to exert a direct influence on residents’ overall quality-of-life. The theoretical contributions, practical implications for sustainable community tourism and sustainable tourism in general and the limitations of the study are discussed.
    • Place Affect Interventions during and post the COVID-19 Pandemic

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; College of Business, Law & Social Sciences, Derby Business School, University of Derby, UK; UiT, School of Business & Economics, The Arctic University of Norway; University of Johanneshburg, Johannesburg Business School, South Africa (Frontiers, 2021-09-14)
      The COVID-19 health and economic crisis has also brought a rise in people being unable to cope with their existing medical conditions and other issues such as domestic violence, drugs, and alcohol among others. Suicidal tendencies have been on the rise. Feelings of isolation causing emotional distress in place-confined settings have put additional pressure on the healthcare systems demanding that we find additional and complementary means of support for those in need. This is important not only in the current pandemic but also in the post-pandemic world. The goal is to collectively contribute and address the recurring calls for actions to maintain global well-being and public health. An important discussion to bring on the table is the need to promote interventions for people to cope with the pandemic and to adjust to the post-pandemic world. Promoting affective attitudes toward place can foster well-being outcomes. This has important benefits and is of relevance to governments, policymakers, and healthcare professionals in delivering better healthcare equipping people with coping mechanisms both throughout the pandemic and in the long run. However, the key challenge is how to foster these place affect attitudes meeting the changing demands in the post-pandemic world. It is in the middle of a crisis that the conversation needs to start about how to strategically plan for the recovery.
    • Place and Post-Pandemic Flourishing: Disruption, Adjustment, and Healthy Behaviors

      Counted, Victor; Cowden, Richard; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Western Sydney University; Harvard University; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-09-22)
      This book rekindles the well-known connection between people and place in the context of a global pandemic. The chapters are divided into two sections. In the first section, “Place Attachment During a Pandemic,” we review the nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and the extent of its impact on place attachment and human-environment interactions. We examine how restrictions in mobility and environmental changes can have a significant psychological burden on people who are dealing with the effect of place attachment disruption that arises during a pandemic. In the second section, “Adjusting to Place Attachment Disruption During and After a Pandemic,” we focus on adaptive processes and responses that could enable people to adjust positively to place attachment disruption. We conclude the book by discussing the potential for pro-environmental behavior to promote place attachment and flourishing in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic by introducing an integrative framework of place flourishing and exploring its implications for theory, research, policy, and practice.
    • Plastics and the spa industry

      Buxton, Louise; Stockdale, Isobel; University of Derby (2019-05-08)
    • Portfolio of major events in Auckland: characteristics, perspectives and issues

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-11)
      Although event portfolios have become an integrated part of destination development, a lack of empirical research into the nature of portfolio design exists. A case study was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, to explore the nature of the applied portfolio strategy in the city. The findings indicate that Auckland employs an outcomes-driven approach which is characterised by the orientation on economic outcomes, an ‘agnostic’ attitude to the compositional structure of the portfolio, an intensive bidding campaign and leveraging strategies. The current city’s reputation awards, successful event bids and positive economic indicators justify this approach. The identified issues, including a supply-led nature of the event portfolio and its predominantly quantitative measures of success, call for a revalidation of the approach. The results of the study contribute to the ongoing discourse about the value of event portfolios and their sustainable design in different urban destinations.
    • Post crisis tourism: attitudes and perceptions of the risk society traveller

      Mandelartz, Pascal; University of Derby (UniversityPublications.net, 2012)
      This paper investigates a tourist segment which has been created out of Ulrich Beck’s Risk Society (1989, 2009). These travellers have been dubbed ‘Risk Society Travellers’. The paper follows Beck’s arguments of a society in which everyday life is increasingly governed by risks that have become incalculable, uncompensatable, unlimited, unaccountable and, most important of all, invisible to our senses. The contention is that people live with permanent non-knowing or with the simultaneity of threats and non-knowing and cannot grasp which concerns one should have and in what situations. These problems of risk and uncertainty pose dilemmas for us all (Mythen and Walklate, 2006). Therefore the nature of the tourism experience is investigated, which this study is trying to connect to post crises tourism in order to gain further understanding of the people that travel to such destinations. During the current times of crisis, in which headlines of terror and catastrophes are predominant in the media, each and every one of us still has to make choices, whether to travel and where to travel. The historical discussions and theoretical development in tourism suggests that catastrophes, such as terrorism and natural disasters impact negatively on tourists’ perception of a destination and therefore have a negative impact on the demand for such destinations. However, tourism numbers are still rising and are forecasted to rise in the future (WTO, 2012). This paper sheds light on the travellers within today’s risk society by use of a case study from Morocco’s post terrorist incident that occurred on 28th April 2011, where the ambivalence by the traveller to the notion of risk contradicts these earlier concepts and research findings. The tourists visiting destinations post-crisis are truly ‘Risk Society Travellers'
    • Potentials of tourism products and services in Bangladesh

      Hassan, Azizul; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-08-30)
      Exploring the potential for tourism development in Bangladesh, an emerging economy has important implications. It is important to have a clear and detailed knowledge of the tourism offerings in the country. However, there is a lack of available literature that analyses the potentials of tourism in Bangladesh. Thus, the aim of this research is to outline the tourism potentials of Bangladesh through the understanding of its tourism resources. This research is based on reviewing the available literature and online resources. Findings show that the potentials of tourism product and service offers in Bangladesh is subject to identification and priority analysis. An effective policy planning and implementation framework becomes relevant in this regard. This research reflects that the potentials of tourism development in Bangladesh can be capitalised with support of an effective set of policy implementation. The potentials of tourism products and services availability and supplies mostly rely on many different factors. Bangladesh as a tourist destination is required to redefine its products and services when the country will experience a sharp growth of domestic tourists mostly benefitting from the disposable income and the availability of leisure time.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: critical link between satisfaction and place attachment in Australia and Canada

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 23/03/2017)
      This study explores issues of scale equivalence and generalizability in national parks. Visitors' place satisfaction, proenvironmental behavior, and place attachment are measured across two qualitatively distinct populations in Australia and Canada. Techniques employed in this cross-country study bring an important contribution to tourism research. The primary focus is to establish measure equivalence before undertaking hypothesis testing using structural equation modeling on a sample of 339 repeat visitors at the Dandenong Ranges National Park, Australia, and 296 repeat visitors at the Bruce Peninsula National Park, Canada. Results from both samples indicate (a) there is measure equivalence between the Australian and Canadian samples allowing comparability of findings, (b) a positive and significant effect of visitor place satisfaction on proenvironmental behavioral intentions, (c) a significant and positive influence of proenvironmental behavioral intention on place attachment (place identity, place dependence, place social bonding, place affect), and (d) a significant and negative effect of visitor place satisfaction on place social bonding. The main finding relates to the promotion of proenvironmental behaviors among national park users that—in addition to individual benefits—provides environmental sustainability as well as practical benefits for park managers and society.
    • Proenvironmental behavior: the link between place attachment and place satisfaction.

      Ramkissoon, H; Mavondo, F. T.; Monash University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 01/12/2014)
      The study tested whether proenvironmental behavioral intention mediates the relationship between place attachment and place satisfaction among visitors of the Dandenong Ranges National Park in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed on a sample of 452 visitors. Regression models were estimated to test the mediating effect of proenvironmental behavioral intentions on the relationships between place dependence, place identity, place affect, place social bonding, and place satisfaction. Results show that as hypothesized, these effects were mediated by proenvironmental behavioral intentions, except for the relationship between place social bonding and place satisfaction. An important theoretical contribution is the mediating role of proenvironmental behavioral intentions in nature-based settings. Practical applications of the study include marketing aimed at encouraging repeat visitation by increasing levels of place attachment and place satisfaction in national parks through proenvironmental message development and delivery.
    • Psychological consumption of culinary artistry in the Peak District

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2011-05-11)
      This paper is based upon the culture of culinary artistry, consumption and design. The ranges of sources are specific to The Peak District using Chatsworth House as a case study. It will attempt to conceptualise the heritage, sustainability and perception of culinary arts as a medium of culture. Elements of cultural heritage tourism will be incorporated into this paper and conceptualised to culinary arts. “Culture is a fascinating concept. Our favourite analogy is to compare it to a beautiful jewel – hold it to the light, and reveal its multiple dimensions. Culture is not just a tool for coping, but a means for creating awareness and for learning”. Harris and Moran (2001) Data collected through in-depth interviews, a questionnaire survey and observation will be presented and analysed which seeks to address the practical aspects to the theoretical models. The qualitative analysis of data suggests that there are parameters that have an important yet underlying resonance in the consumption of the product; cognition, perception and psychology. The fundamental feature of common sense psychology is the underlying belief system that underlies peoples overt behaviour are causes and that it is these causal patterns and NOT the way in which an activity is performed that represents the ‘real’ meaning of what people do. Initial research highlighted attribution theory as the underlying elements or associated discourses and is supported by Lewis (2006) who highlights Hofstedes definition of culture as the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one member from the other. A more simplified definition highlighted by Baron and Byrne (2000) defines culture as an organized system of shared meanings, perception and beliefs held by persons belonging to any group. This ‘cultural sensitivity’ is enhanced by utilising its resources to understand the perception and behaviours influenced by the cultural values (organized system or collective programming) of the host and guest (Wood and Botherton 2008).
    • Reconfiguring the role of local cultural intermediaries in the tourist encounter

      Azara, Iride; University of Derby (University of Algarve, 2013-10-04)
    • Reflecting on perceptions of local communities and visitors: Sustainable heritage leisure and tourism

      Spring, Charles; Wakefield, Lisa; University of Derby (Palgrave McMillan, 2020-06-25)
      The two aspects of Positive Sociology; those of psychology and sociology indicate that communities would prefer that they are engaged and involved in their local leisure activities. Visitors gain satisfaction from experiences they are engaged in. Understanding what these would be is important to destinations. Buxton is undertaking a major regeneration project at the Crescent, a hotel complex with ancillary buildings one of which is the Pump Room. The purpose of research undertaken by students, overseen by academics and members of staff from Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa; was to gain an insight into visitor and community perceptions of Buxton, The Crescent Hotel and The Pump Room. A sustainable use could then be determined for the Pump Room, which has a rich history of visitor use prior to its closure in the 1990’s. Qualitative research was carried out in order to gain a deeper insight into the quality of the community and visitor experience. Quantitative research was used to capture and portray demographics. Data was analysed comparing visitor and community expectations and perceptions of Buxton. Key themes emerging suggest that both visitor and community perceptions and expectations were very similar. The majority of visitors choose Buxton for heritage and culture or the scenery and both groups agreed the most appealing aspects of the Crescent and towns spa heritage, were the history, architecture, outdoor environment and surrounding beauty. Themes regarding future use of the Pump Room gave conflicting opinions. The most common response for both visitors and residents was a tea room/café/restaurant in keeping with the 5* Crescent Hotel. Another theme, which emerged from visitors, was for an entertainment venue. It could be argued that residents and visitors need a better understanding of the Pump Room in order to have a better vision of how it can best be adapted and restored. The authors of this article would suggest that further research is needed with both residents and visitors.
    • Review of survey methods in events management research

      Fletcher, Richard; Bostock, James; University of Derby; De Montfort University (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2019)
      Questionnaire-based surveys are a common data collection tool in events research as established by earlier reviews of methods within the literature. This paper examines and critiques the historic development, current position, gaps in knowledge and future implications for survey-based research. Some diversity is found within survey-based research, however the majority was carried out: as a single method (86%), in physical proximity to the event (67%), during the event (49%), using paper-based forms (65%), designed for self-completion (94%). The event types most commonly targeted were: Sports (43%) Festivals & Celebrations (20%) and Music (12%). The stakeholders targeted were: Audiences (54%), Non-participants (16%) and Managers (12%). Sampling methods, where stated, were likely to be random (23%) or convenience based (22%). Despite the predominance of this data collection tool, numerous areas are ideally in need of further understanding and experimentation. Priorities for future survey-based research are in using mixed methods, multiple surveys, electronic surveys, more deliberate approaches to sampling overall; specifically sampling both before and after events. Targeting stakeholders other than audiences and covering a broader range of events may also be desirable. Emerging technologies and a typology of survey-based research are discussed. The use of survey-based research by policy makers and funders is discussed under the label of ‘operationalised knowledge management’.
    • Revisiting Value Co-creation and Co-destruction in Tourism

      Cavagnaro, Elena; Michopoulou, Eleni; Pappas, Nikolaos; NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences; University of Derby; University of Sunderland (Informa UK Limited, 2021-03-05)
      As COVID-19 has shown in a way unimaginable before it hit, tourism is susceptible to uncertainty and incidents that can directly impact the supply and demand of its discretionary products and services. Before the pandemic, consensus had been reached among practitioners and academics that consumer experience is more important than ever for enterprises as well as destinations, as the sector had become globalized, reached maturity and became highly competitive. Tourism came to a grinding halt due to the pandemic and recovery may take years. Still, the pathway to success (or failure) lies on the overall satisfaction of visitors and tourists, which heavily depends on perceived value; a concept that can be co-created or co-destroyed by the very interaction between all social actors and stakeholders involved. Value creation or destruction is critical not just for traditional supply of and demand for, but also for an array of actors across value and distribution chains (including for example staff and intermediaries across the networks). The special issue’s aim was to assist the better understanding of value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism development by bringing together different perspectives and disciplines. Judging from the diversity of the theoretical perspectives of the articles collected in this issue and the richness of the presented findings the special issue has indeed achieved its aim. Yet some real trends could be distinguished: the relevance of online communication and information; the importance of interpersonal encounters and social interaction for value co-creation and co-destruction in tourism; and the challenges in the design and delivery process of co-created experiences.
    • The role of culture on online search behaviour: A comparative study between British and Chinese travellers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Moisa, Delia; University of Derby; Manchester Metropolitan University (Springer International Publishing, 2016-01-23)
      This study explores the role of culture and its impacts on travellers’ online information search behaviour. The study is focused on two culturally diametric countries: United Kingdom and China (Hofstede, Psychology and Culture, 2011) and they have been selected as case studies, representing values from the Western and the Asian cultures. The research adopted a qualitative approach, and data was collected through interviews in order to enhance the understanding on the subject studied. Findings indicate that culture influences considerably the travellers’ behaviour in the online environment, and as a result of this influence, different behavioural patterns between the British and the Chinese travellers emerged. Conclusions discuss the implications for marketers aiming at the British and the Chinese tourists, and they highlight the need to adopt different strategies in designing and promoting their tourism products for these two particular markets