• Impact of sustainability practices on hospitality consumers’ behaviors and attitudes: The case of LUX* resorts & hotels

      Sowamber, Vishnee; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Movondo, Felix; Monash University (Routledge, 2017-10-02)
      The growing volume of research on customers’ attitudes towards sustainability practices in the hospitality sector has attracted significant interest from researchers and managers in the past decade. This chapter investigates the relationship between sustainability practices in hotels and its influence on consumers’ attitudes and behaviors, and the brand. Using LUX* Resorts & Hotels as a case study, this chapter provides insights into the growing importance of sustainability practices among resorts and hotels. It shows how consumers play an important role in shifting a business strategy towards a more sustainable course. This chapter will be of value to practitioners in helping them align their strategies with customers’ expectations. It contributes to the pool of studies on sustainability in hotels and resorts, which will assist researchers in furthering research and reflection in this area.
    • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • Implications of rituals and authenticity within the spa industry

      Poluzzi, Ilaria; Esposito, Simone; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2020-06-04)
      This manuscript further examines the role of rituals and authenticity, in relation to consumer behaviour, in the spa and wellness sector. In doing so, examples of wellness rituals have been provided and a review of the literature in regards to rituals has been given. Indeed, spas have their specific rituals, performed through the use of products or ingredients, in order to offer customers real experiences, with a total emotional involvement, that creates a multi-sensory journey. These experiences provide memories and positive emotions that, in an experience economy, push customers to look for similar events in the future (Lo et al., 2015; Richins, 2007). However, the factors that contribute to the formation of memorable experiences for guests, in a spa setting, are underexplored concepts and numerous studies call for further explorations (Buxton, 2018; Kucukusta & Guillet, 2014; Lee et al., 2014; Loureiro et al., 2013; Reitsamer, 2015). These would fill the lack of theoretical understanding of ritualisation and authenticity, within the spa services, whose role is influential in creating memorable experiences for spa guests.
    • Industrialization of nature in the time of complexity unawareness, the case of Chitgar lake, Iran

      Akshik, Arash; Rezapour, Hamed; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Eastern Mediterranean University; Bahcesehir Cyprus University; University of Derby (SAGE, 2020-10-16)
      To find answers to the challenges linked with ecological well-being, policymakers and authorities now prefer the ecosystem-based approach, as the solutions inspired by nature may deflect from ecological collapse. Hereupon, nature-based solutions (NBS) are rhapsodized both in practice and academia, as a means to achieve sustainable development. However, NBS, which inherently is supposed to bring forth positive outcomes, may also lead to unsustainable turmoil. On the other hand, the majority of the studies about NBS are from Western countries and studies focusing on the paradoxical functionality of NBS are scant, especially in the Middle East. In an attempt to bridge this gap, the current study uses one of the largest blue man-made infrastructures in the Middle East as a case. Following the phenomenological interpretive approach, the authors argue that NBS may fabricate unintended problems when the complexity of the supra systems are overlooked. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed.
    • Information provision for challenging markets: the case of the accessibility requiring market in the context of tourism

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2013-07)
      The paper investigates the requirements of users with disabilities and the implications that these tourists have for developing accessible tourism information systems. A series of focus groups and interviews revealed the informational needs of people with disabilities, as well as the relevant technical difficulties involved in addressing these needs. The results indicated that the indispensable requirements include the following: (1) the veto or absolutely minimal prerequisites principle; (2) an indication of holistic accessibility paths; and (3) door-to-door access maps. The technical challenges identified focus on interoperability, content integration and personalization. The paper concludes by demonstrating how the tourism industry can overcome these challenges and address disabled travelers’ needs.
    • Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • The interrelationship between place symbolism, memory and voluntary income schemes (VIS): The ‘stick up for Stanage’ campaign.

      Marson, Duncan; Pope, Emma; University of Derby (Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI), 2018-05)
    • Investigating the triangular relationship between Temporary event workforce, event employment businesses and event organisers

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Azara, Iride; Russell, Anna; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2020-04-13)
      This study examines issues of talent management in events. Specifically, it investigates the triangular relationship that exists amongst temporary event workforces, event employment businesses and event organisers. A mixed method design was used including 1) a quantitative survey of UK Temporary Event Workers (TEW) to examine their characteristics and motivations to work at events; 2) a qualitative survey with Event organisers (EOs) to understand the reasons for using Temporary Event Workers and Event Employment Businesses and 3) interviews with Event Employment Businesses (EEBs) to understand their challenges in delivering best-fit between Temporary Event Workers and Event organisers. This study sheds light on the complex relationships amongst temporary event workforces, event organisers and event employment businesses. Findings show TEW who display high levels of affective commitment towards their employment organisation, and possess the characteristics of extraversion and contentiousness, are highly motivated to work at events. Event organisers suggest their operational restrictions (such as limited resources, time and expertise) are fuelling the need to use Event Employment Businesses to source staff with the right skills and attitudes. In turn, these recruiters demonstrate they play an active role in reconciling the often-conflicting needs of Event Organisers and Temporary Event Workers. This study extends knowledge and understanding on Talent Management (TM) in events by providing insights into the characteristics of TEW as a growing labour market segment in the event sector. Significantly, the study contributes to a better understanding of the critical role that Event Employment Businesses play in the
    • An Investigation of European Destination Management Organisations’ Attitudes towards Accessible Tourism

      Michopoulou, Eleni; Buhalis, Dimitrios; University of Derby (2014-10-19)
    • An investigation on the Acceptance of Facebook by Travellers for Travel Planning

      Enter, Nina; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (2013-01)
      Due to the emergence of social media and web 2.0 applications within the last few years, tourists' travel behaviour and decision-making changed. This study investigates tourists' behavioural intentions to use Facebook for travel planning purposes. To address this objective, a combination of survey and 19 interviews provided qualitative and quantitative data. Results indicated that Information search, Sharing travel experiences and Trust were the main determinants of intention to use Facebook. In particular, travellers view Facebook as a tourism information source, they are more willing to share their experiences on their own profile rather than a providers page and that they trust other tourism related sites more than Facebook. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.
    • IT and Well-Being in Travel and Tourism

      Moisa, Delia; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby (Springer, 2022-10-27)
      Accelerating levels of stress and chronic disease have urged travellers to seek products and experiences that promote a holistic healthy living. However, in the context of increasingly integrated online and offline experiences, where technology does not always work in concert with human nature, tourists are facing the challenge of finding about how to best live a connected life. With travel being one of the most stress- inducing experiences we voluntarily subject ourselves to, tourism players are taking advantage of the latest technology to respond to the travellers’ changing needs and values, by designing innovative experiences that promote overall well-being. This chapter provides a review of the existing research on well-being related to the travel and tourism sector, while focusing on the link with technology advancements, especially the dual perspective of unplugging and intense technology use. As in all great technological revolutions, the digital traveller’s life may potentially unveil a dark side. However, the general consensus is that the positives of using technology within the travel and tourism sector will continue to outweigh the negatives. The chapter focuses on highlighting the different types of technology used to support the traveller’s state of well-being, as well as the role and impact of technology in relation to well-being while travelling.
    • Leadership in destination management organisations.

      Hristov, D; Ramkissoon, H; Monash University (Elsevier, 21/09/2016)
    • Legacies from nurturers in tourism; Inspiring people for communities.

      Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (The University of Aveiro, 2017)
      In this paper a review of pre-requisites for supply side competency in developing community based tourism is offered. Using an interpretive and phenomenological approach, the skills, aptitudes and capacity to nurture within the community, are considered in a focus on improving a destination’s ability to sustain tourism as an element of development. This development agenda is dependent on marshalling an array of skills in a complex, differentiated and individualised marketplace. It is difficult to achieve triple-bottom line sustainability without acknowledging key skills in nurturing planning, policy interpretation, building of networks and partnerships, building relationships with other hosts in the community, understanding and interpreting triple-bottom line sustainability, mentoring others, understanding lifestyle choices, innovating whilst at all times enjoying and living a chosen life (Tinsley and Lynch, 2001). Nine UK based informants prioritise the antecedents of successful tourism development from a community based approach. This paper seeks to identify and illuminate practices amongst stakeholders termed ‘nurturers’ that develop tourism and destinations through excitement of image and identity, engagement of many and often diverse groups of people, capturing values and beliefs that are often inimitable and working with supportive public sector stakeholders.
    • Lessons learned: knowledge management and tourism development

      Clarke, Alan; Raffay, Agnes; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Derby (Routledge, 2012-07-02)
    • Local community attitudes and perceptions towards thermalism.

      Fleur, Stevens; Azara, Iride; Michopoulou, Eleni; University of Derby; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Department HRSM, College of Business, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-02-28)
      Thermalism is enjoying a global resurgence of interest as consumers seek out ethical, natural, and place-based wellness experiences. In Europe, the ‘success rate of healing through thermalism has maintained the high reputation of thermal springs with curative powers’. However, thermalism has been culturally lost in the UK. This study focuses on a UK historical spa site currently undergoing restoration. Once restored, this will be one of three UK's only spa hotels with direct access to natural thermal mineral waters. An ethnographic case study design was used to explore community's perceptions and attitudes towards thermalism and the wellness tourism development model being implemented on location. Findings suggest that memories of the values and virtues of thermalism persist within the community and that, if harnessed, can play a significant role in supporting the local and national wellness agenda. However, findings also suggest that the reintroduction of thermal tourism in the location is perceived by the community as a luxury commodity reserved exclusively for the wealthy and elite members of society. Thermalism is a social and cultural resource and thus attention should be paid to ensure that any wellness tourism development model follows a cultural participatory logic and not solely an economic one.
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • Losing IT: knowledge management in development projects

      Clarke, Alan; Raffay, Agnes; Wiltshier, Peter; University of Pannonia (University of the Aegean, 2009)
      Knowledge management and the development of the destination’s capacity of the intellectual skills needed to use tourism as an effective tool in the search for regeneration and development are central themes explored within this paper. The authors have lived and worked with the problems inherent in short term funding of special projects designed to achieve or facilitate tourism development. We have witnessed with growing sadness the results – and the lack of them – as funding cycles end and staff with experience move away. Development processes require multi-stakeholder involvement at all levels, bringing together governments, NGOs, residents, industry and professionals in a partnership that determines the amount and kind of tourism that a community wants (Sirakaya et al., 2001). Planners need to provide knowledge sharing mechanisms to residents, visitors, industry and other stakeholders in order to raise public and political awareness. We note an absence of literature relating to the capacity of communities to learn from short-term funded projects that inherently are destined to provide a strategic blueprint for destination development and in most cases regeneration through community-based tourism action.
    • Major events programming in a city: Comparing three approaches to portfolio design.

      Antchak, Vladimir; Pernecky, Tomas; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2017-11-08)
      Event portfolio design is increasingly important from both academic and industry perspectives. The purpose of this article is to discuss and conceptualize the strategic process of event portfolio planning and development in different urban contexts in New Zealand. A qualitative multiple case study was conducted in three cities: Auckland, Wellington, and Dunedin. Primary data were collected by interviewing city event planners from city councils and relevant council controlled organizations. Secondary data were obtained by the analysis of the relevant documents, including city event policies and strategies, annual reports, statements, and activity plans. Thematic analysis revealed the existence of distinctive portfolio approaches in the studied cases, which can be compared and differentiated by applying the following parameters: Formality, Intentionality, Directionality, and Rhythmicity. Together, these parameters represent a "built-in equalizer" that can be used to balance the opposing values of diverse approaches and adjust them within current city objectives. The article provides a rich and broad context, which enables an understanding of the strategic nature of event portfolios and their implementation within a wider city development agenda.
    • Management Practices for the Development of Religious Tourism Sacred Sites: Managing expectations through sacred and secular aims in site development; report, store and access

      Wiltshier, Peter; Griffiths, Maureen; University of Derby (Dublin Institute of Technology, 2016)
      Through a distillation of practices reflective of the extant literature and socio-economic approaches to inclusive development of sites of religious experiences and worship, we posit that there are seven core conceptual approaches to support evolving site management needs. Therefore, developing sites of special significance necessarily requires the dissemination and sharing of both intellectual and practical contributions to meet those needs in a planned and stakeholder-driven approach. Traditional approaches to development emerged half a century ago with a focus on core competencies and the agreed understanding that open and fair competition would raise quality and assure reasonable profit margins. Creating awareness of services and products and mapping those to our marketing practices are the first two tools in the toolkit. Analysis and synthesis through primary research enables cleric and manager to grasp visitors’ and worshippers’ needs and develop audiences for sites. Fourthly we present the importance of maintenance and plans for developing sites to accommodate factors in both internal and external environments that acknowledge the requirement to remain competitive. Next, the importance of networks, grappling with the wider community and perhaps establishing a wider, even global, reach, is appraised as important. In seeking to tap into resources traditionally not employed in managing religious and pilgrimage sites we elevate the need for an enterprise culture (this enterprise culture is seen in the other papers in this special issue). The final offer includes dimensions of volunteering, nontraditional support networks, altruism and philanthropy which we name as ‘the third way'.