• Teaching an old dog new tricks.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (15/07/2018)
      At a recent animal studies conference I noticed that although discussions were of the subjects being sentient and cognate, the delivery was for humans. Essentially, animals have no opportunity to understand the theories written about them. For the past year I have been reading animal theory to dogs, cats and horses and now it is time for a lecture for dogs and their humans about dogs in art. ‘Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks’ is a different type of lecture for an interspecies audience and extended ‘pack’.
    • Television dramas as memory screens

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2011)
      Abstract: Within this article I am focus upon the construction of both social and personal memories within the television drama, drawing upon Landsberg’s notion of prosthetic memory and King’s identification of ‘afterwardsness’ as ways of comprehending the construction of memory and the past within texts. The examples are The Long Walk to Finchley (Tony Saint, BBC 4, 2008) and Life on Mars (2007-8). Both dramas share a number of concerns yet each has a very different context within British television. The relationship between viewers’ adopting memories from the dramas and incorporating these into their own sets of memories, including my own memories of the dramas is considered. Equally, the negotiation of the media and public discourses as memory screens with which we interact is a primary concern.
    • Telling Our Story: Sharing the Experiences of Irish Emigrants Through Film

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-05-06)
      The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project. It is hoped this project may help inspire further oral history projects involving not only Irish but other cultural communities in the UK. Link to Our Story film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTIOdA3nh5Q
    • Thirteen

      Shore, Tim; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (10/09/2016)
      Thirteen interrogates the history and significance of 27/28 Queen Street, Derby, a now derelict building that was once the home of John Flamsteed (1646-1719), the first Astronomer Royal. A series of works, including a digital animation, gifs, digital prints and an artist’s book. The work will be exhibited at the Wirksworth Festival 2016 and also at Derby Cathedral. The publication will include commissioned essays that consider the themes of Thirteen from range of disciplines, it will be published by QUAD. Before moving south to Greenwich in 1675, Flamsteed compiled a ‘great catalogue of the stars’ from a series of observations all based on a Derby Meridian that ran through the back garden of his Derby home. The place from where the position of every other place – on Earth, and in the Heavens - was determined was in his back garden in Derby. Thirteen considers the resonance of Derby having shifted from being the centre or beginning of the world, to being 5 minutes 54.6 seconds behind. Thirteen was commissioned by D-LAB Digital Art in Derbyshire and supported by a University of Derby College of Arts Research grant. Digital animation by Tim Shore. Sound by Michael Brown.
    • Tickled pink.

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2017-03)
      Research into small publishing projects. Exploration of current market competition in illustrated publications and zines. An extensive investigation into risograph printing process in order to create limited edition publication.
    • Time tides: An exploration of dynamic loop-based performance diffused in a multi-channel environment.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Sounds in Space Symposium, 27/06/2017)
      This performance at Sounds in Space Symposium (University of Derby) by the audio-visual duo, Time.lus, explores (through live interaction) the dynamic dialogue between rhythmic, audio-visual materials in space. Original source material is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. The work is evolved through the use of audio-visual effects and dynamic processors.
    • Tissue-conducted spatial sound fields

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Institute of Acoustics, 14/10/2014)
      We describe experiments using multiple cranial transducers to achieve auditory spatial perceptual impressions via bone (BC) and tissue conduction (TC), bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus. This could be useful in cases of peripheral hearing damage or where ear-occlusion is undesirable. Previous work (e.g. Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006)1,2 indicated robust lateralization is feasible via tissue conduction. We have utilized discrete signals, stereo and first order ambisonics to investigate control of externalization, range, direction in azimuth and elevation, movement and spaciousness. Early results indicate robust and coherent effects. Current technological implementations are presented and potential development paths discussed.
    • A Trusted Voice: The Threat to Irish Local Radio News Journalism

      McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (Future of Journalism Conference 2021 Cardiff University, 2021-09-22)
      For an anxious public living through the triple threat of biological, environmental, and economic crises, the need for rigorously gathered and trusted news and information has arguably never been more important. The proliferation of fake or unreliable news disseminated by social media, among other sources, puts into sharper focus the need for an independent, robust and publicly funded voice to cut through the nonsense and clutter. Radio remains the most trusted source of news and information in the Republic of Ireland (Reuters Institute 2018) and with 81% of all adults tuning in to radio daily (Ipsos MRBI 2021) news and current affairs output from the Irish Radio Industry is a particularly valuable public service. Much of this is as a result of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s licencing conditions, however, this overlooks the fact that local radio’s unique selling point, and that which draws audiences to them and away from the public service broadcaster RTÉ, is their knowledge and coverage of local news, current affairs, weather and sport. Furthermore, the commercial sector is much more adept and responsive to change in response to adversity and new challenges and can be the leader of transformation in the industry (McMahon 2019). As a result, local radio holds its own against the sizeable and well-resourced RTÉ and on average local stations enjoy around 50% market share (Ipsos MRBI 2021). However, the Irish Radio Industry has been experiencing a sustained period of economic hardship since the great recession in 2008 crippled the Irish economy. Add to this the competition for audience attention and advertising spend posed by the digital behemoths Facebook and Google and the picture is somewhat grim and pessimistic for this medium that is relied upon so much by the public for trustworthy news. RTÉ has not been immune to these pressures and it too is in a dire financial situation at present with cuts and asset sales ongoing to balance the books. Local radio news departments are the largest and most expensive cost centres for local radio stations due to the aforementioned quality of coverage offered and are therefore under threat. Less resources will inevitably lead to a reduction in the depth and breadth of news coverage. The primary threat to Irish radio’s news and journalism comes in the form of the agglomeration of radio stations by powerful multinationals into fewer entities. Under this form of structure stations typically cover larger areas but with a more homogeneous output and, crucially a centralised (McDonald & Starkey 2016) and generic news service which is cheap and limited in its scope. This rationalisation of radio has been the trend in the United Kingdom over the past decade (Hendy 2000; Waterson 2020) and the recent takeover of Communicorp, Ireland’s largest commercial radio group, by Bauer Media suggests a similar trend is on its way to Ireland. Using the Irish Radio Industry as its focus this paper draws from interviews with Irish industry professionals and considers what action the industry might take in the coming years and what government measures might help protect radio as a trusted and valued voice.
    • Twofoldness/threefoldness: Marc Lüders' photopicturen

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2018-11)
      My essay 'Twofoldness/Threefoldness: Marc Lüders' Photopicturen' used as the text accompanying Marc Lüders' exhibition - 'Marc Lüders/Twofoldness' at the Levy Gallery, Hamburg in November 2018.
    • Unsatisfactory devices: legacy and the undocumentable in art.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
      Regarding perception of ephemeral artwork when lost to the fractures of time Peggy Phelan states “you have to be there.” For Phelan ephemera, specifically performance “become[s] itself through disappearance,” which draws empathy with Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “aura of the original.” In practice this a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing such artworks, for how can they exist beyond the moment of making if not recorded, in order to map their histories? This essay interrogates the critical, sensitive and individualized distance necessary to archive transient artworks. Moving beyond the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation, it interrogates how divergent and sympathetic modes of practice allow for a greater level of sustainable critique. This complex and problematic terrain is analysed in response to The Alternative Document, an exhibition I curated on the subject in 2016, and suggests archival possibilities beyond formal academic, artistic and museological conventions.
    • Unsavoury thoughts

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Meraki greetings cards, 2018-01)
      Investigation into trends within the industry, exploring varied audiences for the gift market. Research of current Illustration competition, use of humour and subjects in the industry. A body of visual experimentation and process to challenge and create contemporary illustrated outcomes in the field of design. Visual research into drawing and experimentation into line quality, characterisation and developing appropriate characters for audience. Distributed nationally currently featured in UK retail outlets such as Paperchase.
    • Unsettling action and text: a collaborative experience.

      Bartram, Angela; O'Neill, Mary; University of Lincoln (Routledge, 2016)
      The original abstract for this text was written in 2009, and reflected the beginning of a collaboration informed by two individuals’ research confidences and disciplines. A work titled ‘Oral/Response’, which combined the documentation of a performance within its structure, allowed a conversation to emerge between disciplines and ways of working, of live action and its textual documentation. ‘Oral / Response’ explored the dynamic, but often disjointed relationship between these two linked but separate elements within the performance itself. The simultaneous dialogue between action and text in this work aimed to highlight the ways in which performance and its legacy as documentation can be reflexive and co-dependent. By making the text as evanescent as the act it describes, this work became the foundation of a new form of practice for both collaborators, a nexus of theory and practice that combined different languages, different ways of knowing and experiencing. The rules and regulations that direct and confine solo compositions in text and action became less rigid, more malleable and symbiotic. In the interim and beyond this work the collaboration has developed in such a way that the distinction between these disciplines, specifically in critical theory and arts practice, has become insignificant. While initially the partnership provided access to each other’s disciplines there is now fluidity, confidence, and trust whereby the roles ascribed to each varies depending on the requirement of the work. The lines have become blurred, and the separation of roles foggy allowing each collaborator the safety and space to take risks by entering domains that are less familiar research methodologies. Therefore the collaboration, aside from the actual work produced, has a significant extra dimension - it allows each partner to become confident and articulate in the others field. Dynamic elements have been liberated for the possibility of an analysis of the range of co-efficiencies and motivations that abound from this fusion, and speaks of the nature of collaboration itself. A reflexivity in approach and position has reshaped, informed, and re-informed the possibilities for emergent research, where trust allows each participant to be confident in a range of methods for creating knowledge. This chapter traces the development of the collaborative relationship from its beginning in two distinct areas of expertise and strength to a partnership where there is now more overlapping of roles.
    • A utilitarian antagonist: the zombie in popular video games

      Hunt, Nathan; The University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
      This article takes as its starting point the prevalence of the zombie in video games. I argue that, although the zombie games often superficially resemble filmic texts in their use of aesthetic and narrative, they must be understood, less as a set of conventions and thematic metaphors in the way that the zombie text has been read in film and television scholarship, and more as a utilisation of the zombie as a utilitarian antagonist that facilitates and permits the pleasures of violence and fantasy in video game play. Beginning with the Resident Evil and Left 4 Dead series of games I examine the way that games necessarily update the notion zombie as mass antagonist via the need to vary gameplay activity through different styles of adversary for players. At the same time I will demonstrate that, far from simply being the province of the survival horror genre, the zombie appears across an array of game forms, game cultures and game productions. The zombie highlights the participatory nature of game culture in the array of zombie 'mods' that users create to transform existing games into zombie based games, in particular in relation to titles such as the Call of Duty series. At the other end of the production spectrum the zombie features heavily in the little studied area of online flash games where the zombie can be found in a variety of game genres and forms. The zombie here often operates as a pastiche of popular zombie narratives in survival games (The Last Stand), parodic engagements with zombie conventions (Jetpacks and Zombies) or play with the notion of zombie pandemics (the Infectionator games). Here I situate the zombie game as a aesthetic genre that works to provide an easily understandable context for such interactive genres as survival horror, text adventures, shooting games, physics games and driving games, with the popularity of these enough to drive numerous dedicated hosting and link sites such as zombiegames.net. The pastiche element of these games extends into gamers social engagement with games. Online debates over the the appropriate actions or preparation for a zombie holocaust are commonplace on the internet in such spaces as Zombieresearch.net. Whilst many of these sites feature decidedly tongue in cheek engagement with the notion of the zombie apocalypse, the users of fora for games like Left 4 Dead and Dead Island tend to debate this directly in the terms of the games themselves, discussing their relative merits or realism. Some of these games also highlight the specific pleasures of identifying the zombie as protagonist of sorts. In discussing this I will return to online gaming and the Left 4 Dead games in which players may compete online as part of the zombie horde. Such games raise major questions for the issues of identification and immersion that are said to be at the centre of the game experience. I will also explore the parodic pleasures of many flash games that situate the player in the role of spreading zombie infections. Throughout this article I aim to demonstrate that the zombie in game culture is less a cultural metaphor than a combination of utilitarian antagonist and a persistent aesthetic; a means of providing style or pleasure to many games that relies on the intertextual and flexible nature of the zombie as popular cultural phenomenon.
    • Water-fountain-sculpture

      Locke, Caroline; Wermers, Nicole; Pye, William; Janzing, Godehard; Bussman, Valerie; German Forum for Art History; University of Derby (Henry Moore Institute, 28/01/2017)
      This seminar event explored how water and fountains have been used by artists and sculptors for a variety of purposes. The afternoon began with a discussion of Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' (1917) and examined more recent examples of water sculpture such as the memorial at Ground Zero. In collaboration with Dr Godehard Janzing (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte), Valerie Bussmann (independent), Nicole Wermers (artist), William Pye (artist) and Caroline Locke (artist). Godehard Janzing discussed ‘Falling Waters at Ground Zero: when Terrorism turns into Nature’ and how the use of the symbolism of water becomes problematic in this context. Valerie Bussmann continued the theme of the city with an examination of the relationship Paris has with water as both necessity and art. Water as a sculptural material was explored by Nicole Wermers, focusing specifically on her 2011 series ‘Wasserregal’ (‘Watershelves’). William Pye has long been inspired by water and first introduced it as a major sculptural element in his work in the 1980s. Caroline Locke shared the themes of water and vibration, which have formed a key part of her practice and focused on her use of water in connection with her Performing Data projects. She has used her water fountains to animate certain data sets in connection with the human body and environmental data.
    • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

      Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
      This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
    • William Melville: Eve of war

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Raidió Chiarraí Teoranta, 08/01/2015)
      This detective drama was written and produced to educate the Irish audience about one of their greatest historical heroes, the spymaster William Melville, a.k.a. ‘M’, whose exploits have been largely overlooked by historians. The script, audio style, performances and soundscape were carefully designed to recreate the classic detective radio dramas of the 1940s, offering a unique nostalgic experience for the listener, rarely heard on radio today. Synopsis: It’s 1914. Europe is on the brink of a war that will define the 20th century, and the fledgling British Secret Service, under the command of Kerryman William Melville, must stop a German spy ring operating covertly throughout London before they carry out their deadly operation. Based on real events this drama recreates the plot that pitted the legendary detective, who hailed from Sneem, Co. Kerry, against the Kaiser's ruthless spymaster, Gustav Steinhauer. Once colleagues but now adversaries, each man will stop at nothing to complete his mission. The German plot is to destroy the gold reserves in the Bank of England, thereby shattering Britain's economy and severely hampering or nullifying Britain's war effort. The events are thought to have inspired Ian Fleming to write his best-selling James Bond novel Goldfinger. This programme is part of a special ongoing series of dramas on spymaster William Melville. This production was selected to compete for the Prix Europa 2016 in the Radio Fiction category and won Silver for Best Radio Drama at the New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards 2016.
    • William Melville: The Queen's detective.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-05)
      In this classic detective drama, set in the summer of 1889, Melville’s skills are put to the test as he is assigned to protect the visiting Shah of Persia as Fenian anarchists aim assassinating the royal guest. This drama is based on actual events and creates an intriguing insight into the world of political intrigue, criminality, and espionage that would have existed in late Victorian London. The drama was produced for the audience in county Kerry where William Melville was from and was intended to educate and entertain the listeners young and old about one of the county's most decorated sons.
    • With a little help from my friends: The Irish radio industry's strategic appropriation of social network sites for commercial growth.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (IGI Global, 2017)
      Ireland has faced significant economic hardship since 2008, with the Irish radio industry suffering as advertising revenues evaporated. The difficult economic circumstances have forced radio station management to devise new and cost effective ways of generating much-needed income. The answer has come in the form of Facebook, the leading Social Network Site (SNS) in Ireland. Using Ireland as a case study, this chapter looks at how radio station management are utilising the social network strategically in a bid to enhance their audiences and revenues. Radio station management consider Facebook to be an invaluable promotional tool which is very easily integrated into radio programming and gives radio a digital online presence, reaching far greater audiences than possible through broadcasting. Some radio stations are showing ambition and are realising the marketing potential that Facebook and other SNSs hold. However, key changes in practice, technology and human resources are required to maximise the profit-making possibilities offered by Facebook.
    • World Heart Day 2017

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      A national campaign that engaged social media, fashion design, publication and media to engage in the world heart day. A diverse visual response to the open theme of the heart, capturing cultural, and humorous characterisation associated with hearts. Engaged media in the campaign and raise awareness of the charity globally.
    • You anorak!: the Doctor Who experience and experiencing Doctor Who

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Intellect, 2013)