• The same sky - A musical

      Ellis, Daniel; University of Derby; Harvey, Tim; Baggaley, Phil (Guildhall Theatre, 28/06/2016)
      THE SAME SKY is a ‘live’ on-going Musical Theatre project. This research investigates, from the perspective of the composer, the entire creative and technical process of producing a musical, from conception through to performance. The creative collaborative dialogue between composer, author and theatrical director in the production of a new musical will be presented and discussed. Each step has been documented allowing the investigation of the developmental mechanisms, planning, communication and practicalities involved in the launching of such a project. Considerations of the technical practicalities, theatrical possibilities within constrained budgets and how these also effect the compositional and artistic decisions made. It additionally explores the subjective nature of the creative process and questions how the combination of tried and tested compositional methodologies might combine with newer creative skill sets to ignite the development and evolution of a new project. Each step along the production timeline will be illustrated with musical examples to offer insight into the creative process. It is hoped that the research will demonstrate that it is indeed possible to produce a musical with little experience of the genre, providing the appropriate supporting expertise is in place; but this should not diminish the author’s many years experience in the related area of song-writing without which such a venture would be ill-advised.
    • Scent of a Woman; A screen-printed artists publication

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-06)
      This publication was developed to explore the creation of multiples through the hand printed process, researching the traditional use of printmaking in a contemporary artists book format. Ideas surrounding the theme of ‘Lost and Found” were developed initially using the medium of collage and drawing and then taken forward into screen-print. The concertina book was initiated as a response to the sub-heading “ scent of a woman ‘ that illustrated the research and investigation, commenting on the perfume recipes that have been lost and found over the years within the Parisian perfume houses. The artist books serves as a vehicle to document these findings a more abstract way, inviting the viewer the opportunity to debate the narrative of the artist book, with no beginning or end.
    • Seeing in: Two-fold, three-fold?

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Mac Birmingham, 29/11/2016)
      Taking Richard Wollheim’s theory that seeing pictures is a two-fold experience of perception, (between the marked surface of the physical object and something depicted in its surface), this paper analyses my recent practice of creating artworks that place painted marks directly onto photographic prints of paint marks as a means of challenging the viewer as to what exactly is being seen in the picture. This conjoined photographic / painting practice also builds on Regina-Nino Kurg’s assertion that there is, in fact, a three-fold perceptual experience in seeing pictures. That is, seeing the physical object that is the picture - its configuration, whilst simultaneously seeing the object depicted in the picture - its representation, and the subject of the picture - its figuration. The research opens debates around the perceptual differences of seeing in the photographic image, which contains both representation and figuration; seeing in the painted image, which can contain either representation or representation and figuration; and seeing in the picture comprising of both the photographic and the painted. It is at the point of physical conjunction between photograph and paint that the question of multiple-‘foldness’ becomes particularly complex, and which this paper will begin to explicate. This particular research-based practice aims to illuminate an aspect of my overarching PhD research question, ‘To what degree can an art practice of painting onto digital photographic prints illuminate the ontological relationship between representational painting and photography in the digital age’?
    • Seeking best practice for education and training in the recording studio

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Werner, Duncan; Crossley, John; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 20/08/2015)
      This paper reflects on the delivery of a module in recording studio practice. The module is intended to equip level 5 students with the necessary skills to undertake final year project work whilst introducing aspiring recording artists and music producers to a career in industry. These goals are compounded by the expectations of accreditation bodies that work in partnership with academic institutions to raise the standard of graduates entering into the business of music recording and production. Drawing on the authors’ educative experiences and observations the paper highlights the challenges posed by the tension between training and education, and investigates the potential for novel approaches to curriculum design.
    • A sense of becoming and alienation: the retrospective in the work of Jordan McKenzie.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby; School of Arts, College of Arts, Humanities and Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 15/08/2018)
      The act of art retrospective, specifically that placed within a museum or gallery, is to reflect on, and give knowledge of something past. Retroactive in its overview of an artist’s practice, it is inherently backwards facing rather than future focused. As an act that specifies finiteness and conclusion, a living artist’s retrospective produces an ananomaly. In 2016, I simultaneously staged the Alternative Document symposium and exhibition. This included Retrospective 2027 by Jordan McKenzie, an event set in the future and staged by a living artist. Positioned as a keynote in the symposium rather than the exhibition it not only offered the retrospective as a representation of the artworks of the living, but also challenged traditional formats of structural placement. Situated within colloquialism rather than exhibition, the aim was to set it adrift from the gallery to open it to critical analysis and debate. This essay considers McKenzie’s approach to retrospective and how it differs from the conventional. Including my critical conversation with the artist, his performed, gestural and event-based approach is discussed for how it differs from the regular model of exhibition. The essay discusses the implications for the documentation of performance and the retrospective in McKenzie’s work.
    • Sensory augmentation through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (InTech, 18/10/2017)
      One hundred volunteers have undergone short (5 min) listening tests in a novel multi-transducer bone-and-tissue conduction apparatus for spatial audio. The subjects subsequently described their experiences in an unstructured qualitative elicitation exercise. Their responses were aggregated to identify key themes and differences. Emergent themes are: enjoyable, informative, spatial and strange. Tactile supplementation of spatial audio display was noted in a positive light. We note that some spatial attributes are more perceptible than others. The implications for perceptual augmentation are discussed, particularly in relation to conductive hearing deficits. We conclude that the technique has potential for development and discusses future research directions.
    • The shape of my thoughts

      Baggaley, Phil; Brown, Michael; Bosward, Marc; Poynton, Stuart; Thorpe, Hayley; University of Derby (2016-03)
      An immersive multimedia Installation consisting of multi-channel Ambisonics surround-sound audio and animated 3D projection. Our intention was to produce a multimedia installation incorporating the animation of avian-like murmuration events synchronised to sound and music. The primary objective was to construct an audio/visual experience that loosely expresses an absent narrative. We wanted to explore the dynamics of multidisciplinary collaboration observing and recording the exchanges and expressive negotiations between composers and animators to produce an immersive expressive design. The piece employed large-scale digital projection and ambisonic surround sound. The installation was also displayed as part of the at ‘Nature Connections’ Festival in September 2015 and was featured on BBC’s Autumn Watch red button content. More recently, the piece was presented at the The International Festival for Innovations in Music Production and Composition at Leeds College of Music. The piece is the first installment of a planned trilogy of works that will extend and develop the collaborative experimentation with animation and sound in the production of immersive installation and performance.
    • Showman of the screen: Joseph E. Levine and his revolutions in film promotion.

      McKenna, Anthony Thomas; University of Derby (University Press of Kentucky, 23/09/2016)
      Joseph E. Levine was one of the most recognisable figures in post-War American cinema; he pioneered saturation opening techniques, revolutionised art-film marketing, and was hugely successful as a producer. He dealt in every conceivable type of film, from arthouse to exploitation to blockbusters, and became the famous film promoter in America. Showman of the Screen is the first book to fully investigate Levine's life and work, detailing his life and extraordinary career in the film industry, and focussing on what he called his "peculiar talent" for movie exploitation and showmanship. Based on extensive archival research and interviews with many of Levine's collaborators, this book positions Levine as the most versatile film promoter, and self-promoter, of his generation. Showman of the Screen details Levine's tough upbringing in the slums of Boston, and his subsequent journey from being provincial movie exhibitor to becoming the best-known movie showman in America. The book also shows how Levine was able to capitalise on emerging cultural trends, whilst also maintaining his reputation as a maverick by fiercely guarding his independence and deliberately provoking condemnations from cultural commentators. This book acts as a corrective to the many histories of post-War American cinema that either ignore or underestimate Levine's achievements and influence. His multifarious appetites ensured that his presence was felt in all genres, and that is influence is still with us today is testament to his position as one of the most important pioneering figures in America post-War cinema.
    • Sigma7 – Rosetta

      Crossley, John; University of Derby; Lane, Kit (2014)
      Live performance of original composition using multichannel surround sound system. Exploring the interaction of composition with multichannel sound performance and incorporating audience experience.
    • Singing Pools

      Locke, Caroline (17/04/2013)
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; Scott, Samara; University of Derby (The Tetley, 2014)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators and artists throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; May, Lucy; University of Derby (Spacex Gallery, 2013-10)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators, artists and myself throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Skittish

      Watts, Lisa; Kefford, David; University of Derby (Vane Gallery, 2013)
      Skittish researches curatorial models for performance art in the white cube gallery space for the regular day-time viewers. Skittish is three exhibitions and is the first stage of two stages in this research. Each set of curators at each of the three galleries collaborated with me curate a sculptor alongside my art. The proposition was that all art forms of sculpture, video and performance, hold similar artistic concerns and artistic processes. An 'outside eye/ researcher' was employed, Joanne Lee, who is a Senior Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University in Graphic design. She interviewed the curators and artists throughout the three exhibitions.
    • Solar patterning: The employment of fast and fugitive colorants via Anthotype, Cyanotype and other photographic techniques.

      Wells, Kate; Greger, Ness; University of Derby (Progress in Colour Studies (PICS), 2016-09)
      This paper discusses on-going research into natural dyes, mineral dyes (Lake pigments or raised colours) and leuco-vat dyes (Inko and SolarFast) with the potential to create a sustainable method of patterning fabric that employs the light sensitivity and fastness properties (fast or fugitive) of the colorants in creating a permanent (photographic) image in colour upon natural or re-generated fibre base.
    • Solaris - Lem/Tarkovsky/Soderbergh: adaptations in space

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Gylphi, 2013)
    • Sound Fountain

      Locke, Caroline (21/06/2010)
    • Spatialization and computer music

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2011-04)
      This article is about the possibility of a new kind of music; computer-managed signal processing offers unprecedented possibilities in the control of sound fields, and the promise of three-dimensional music is on the horizon. A paradigm shift is under way; as technological constraints are rolled back, so must conceptual constraints be reevaluated. Some of these are concerned with what spatiality actually is. This article asks if people had evolved without vision, how they would have ever had developed concepts of perfect forms such as triangles, exact circles, precise shapes, and completely straight lines. Auditory spatial perception tends to suffer in direct comparison with vision, but it may be that spatiality in audition is fundamentally different in several important respects. New musical metaphors can illuminate these, and the control possibilities offered by digital audio are at the forefront of these experiments.
    • Staying creative: creative technique, habit and experience

      Wilson, Chris; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This chapter focuses analysis on a practice-based research project exploring personal creativity in musical composition. Seeking simply to explore the process and experience of creative routines in a more focused way―most specifically through imposed constraints of discipline, productive time and working materials―the project developed in unexpected ways and the focused act of observation itself led to the development of unanticipated insights. Initial assumptions being that: 1) The right balance of challenge/constraint and creative context can stimulate creative fluency and flow, and; 2) The wrong balance of challenge/constraint and creative context can inhibit creativity, the subtle variations of experience and the delicate structures involved in framing ‘creative balance’ in the composition process developed insights into the relationship between creative boundaries, activities, and creative identity. Creative fluency and creative quality can, and routinely does, emerge from difficult and constrained creative conditions. This text presents a personal insight into the creative experience of working through a defined programme of compositional activity, deliberately designed to test and to challenge, and how the same parameters of creative activity can frame everything from the most positive and affirming of musical activity, to the most desperate and distressing. It is through both pain and pleasure that creative value can emerge.
    • A story to tell

      Hunt, Ava; University of Derby (2017)
      Thousands of refugees flee from worldwide conflict every day – they continue to arrive on the shores of Europe – but what can we do? A Story to Tell, through poetry, readings and responses to the refugees fleeing conflict, presents first-hand accounts of people who have stood on the shores of the Mediterranean, who have saved lives, who have worked in the Jungle in Calais – these testaments bear witness to the dilemmas of us all who want to do something. An evening of powerful, honest and uplifting accounts – truly inspiring. This is the second piece that Ava has created with Amnesty, the first resulting in Acting Alone which has toured nationally and internationally to sell out performances and critical acclaim: “compelling” John Godber “Acting Alone .. ambitious and provoking” Buxton Fringe “accomplished theatre maker” Theatre Guru