• Jane Eyre's Arrival at Thornfield Hall: Illustration of Jane Eyre’ arrival at Thornfield Hall

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2014-06)
      The illustration was awarded first prize in the illustration section of the Brontë Society creative competition. The print submitted for the Brontë creative competition investigated and examined the use of hand drawn elements in a predominantly photographic printing process and how this might be developed and disseminated to the design student cohort through my teaching using the photogravure method of creating mark-making. The work has been viewed at local, national and international levels by those interested in the works of the Bronte’s and the research could potentially give a greater understanding of the history and literature of the Bronte’s to general art enthusiasts and a wider public audience. Also published in Bronte Studies January 2015 40 (1)
    • John Minton’s "Time was away: A notebook in Corsica"

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (10/11/2016)
      The paper examines the range in Minton’s approach at two levels. Firstly, it considers his dual strategies of Romanticism and Realism. Minton conflates topographical concerns with Neo-Romantic tendencies and draws on the landscape traditions of the sublime and picturesque, and the trope of the figure in the landscape. Secondly, the paper examines the images within a register of autonomy. Some images, operate autonomously, procuring primarily aesthetic responses; in contrast, others demand more literal intertextual readings; still, a further category of semi autonomous images are identified which subtly evoke elements of the text, without being hostage to Ross’s prose. These works in particular, I argue, invite the reader/viewer to re-assemble text and image so as to re-envision and re-imagine the Corsican Landscape. By examining text-image relationships, the place of landscape in post-war illustration, collaborative practice, and the relationship between fine art and illustration, the paper aims to contribute to forwarding the theorisation of illustration.
    • Jonathan Vickers and Kerri Pratt

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (WordPress, 21/07/2014)
      2014 Jonathan Vickers Award winner Kerri Pratt, her work and circumstances relating to the award.
    • Journeys, pathways and track plans

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2014-10)
      Journeys - a 2 week contemporary art exhibition based around the idea of the various forms a journey can take, be that physical, of the mind or imagination. Ecopsychology is a psychological subfield that looks at the relationship between human beings and their environment, embracing a more revolutionary paradigm: just as Freud believed that neuroses were the consequences of dismissing deep rooted sexual and aggressive instincts, eco-psychologists believe that grief, despair and anxiety are the consequences of dismissing equally deep rooted ecological instincts.’ It is this connection between the human psyche and nature that is being explored. ‘In the Drowned World’ a recent series of images taken on walks along the track-bed of a disused railway feature labyrinthine, tangled and sometimes menacing vegetation inspired by the paintings of Max Ernst, alluding to Ballardian themes of nature’s retribution. The large scale image is printed on duratrans mounted on opaque Perspex and fixed to the outside of a window, the impression being of the tangled vegetation viewed through the window.
    • Karri Pratt: Our treasure houses

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 2015-09)
      Kerri Pratt’s paintings have references to curious spaces derived from man-made, industrial and urban landscapes. Drawing on childhood memories of growing up in an ex-mining town, when the demise of previously thriving industries of Collieries, Potteries, Pipeworks and Brickworks were all too prominent. Kerri has reconnected with her home county of Derbyshire to produce a new series of paintings referencing remnants and traces of our industrial heritage.
    • The kites are flying

      Hunt, Ava; Maggie Ford; University of Derby (2013-05)
      A television reporter’s experience in the West Bank reveals how children’s hopes and dreams for peace can fly higher than any wall dividing communities and religions. Why won’t Said speak? Why does he make beautiful kites and let them loose in the wind? Following actor Ava Hunt and Director Maggie Ford’s recent visit filming in the West Bank, join us for this new one-woman multimedia performance, bringing this beautiful story alive with laughter, thrills and tears to a land where friendship has no barriers.
    • Layers of meaning, layers of truth: fragmented histories and composited video collage

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (Royal College of Art, 14/05/2016)
      The paper will present a body of ongoing practice-based research that interrogates the interface of live-action and animation, specifically, how found footage as an indexical element of lived experience functions within the aesthetic of a constructed ‘other’ world. Particular focus is given to how video collage, containing found footage components composed in the spatial as well as temporal dimensions, construct non-fiction explorations of the socio-historical world from an ontological perspective. The research explores how found footage elements are deployed to address themes relating to memory and history, with regard to how collective impressions of history are constituted and socially assimilated.
    • Layers, traces and gaps: Collage, found footage and the contested past

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (23/06/2017)
      Critical realism is an anti-reductionist approach that asserts the independence of an external world whilst accepting that knowledge of that world is socially constructed and transient. It offers an intermediate position that reconciles the binary opposition of objectivism and subjectivism, challenging the ‘false choice’ (Lovell, 1981) between empiricist and idealist ontologies. In recognising the dense complexity of being and the social world, it advances a stratified reality comprised of co-dependent structures and mechanisms. The paper will describe a framework for practice research that uses found footage and animated collage within a critical realist methodology. The research deploys strategies that privilege simultaneity, overlap and hybridity in articulating layered temporalities that foreground a dialectical conception of history. The practice explores how critical realist collage can challenge essentialist, unitary historical narratives that suppress the interdependence and complexity of socio-historical phenomena. Can the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective memory be rendered through the aesthetic of moving collage? In reference to animated documentary, the work investigates how spatial and temporal found footage collage can expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and the past. The paper will argue that the deeper understanding of memory and history that critical realism offers could be apprehended through the construction and mediation that the vocabularies of animation and collage contain.
    • Leading strategic change in arts: twist or bust?

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (27/01/2017)
      Reviewing leadership and management of strategic level operations and change, and will draw on a number of relevant and diverse organization level case studies of change looking at how HEI manage change.
    • Left behind.

      O'Connor, Aisling; Clarke, Siobhan; McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Shannonside Northern Sound Radio, 2014-04)
      This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by This production was heavily inspired by the Ann Lovett's story from 1984. Ann was a 15-year-old schoolgirl found dead at a Grotto in Granard, Co Longford in late January with her new born baby by her side. Both died of exposure. This drama suggests what might have happened had a heavily pregnant Ann fled Granard. The play explores the journey her daughter may have taken to uncover her mother's past in a community unwilling to discuss it. The writers were careful not to be overt in their references to the Ann Lovett story as it remains a sensitive subject in the area to this day. This drama is unique because it strives to give young Irish women with unexpected pregnancies a voice in a country where abortion remains illegal. The drama skillfully integrates flashbacks to the 1980s to imagine the struggle and pain Cyndi's mother must have experienced. The radio play was written by Aisling O'Connor (producer) and Siobhan Clarke (director). The production was produced and edited by Daithí McMahon.
    • Let’s talk about peace over dinner: A cultural experience on memory, dislocation and the politics of belonging in Cyprus.

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Intellect, 2018-04-23)
      On Saturday 9 April 2011, Greek Cypriot artist Lia Lapithi invited a group of eighteen guests to join her for her own version of the Last Supper, a four-course dinner that took place in the warehouse of an old furniture factory in Nicosia, Cyprus. The dinner was the first project of a series of orchestrated meals that Lapithi hosted and participated, where the theme was hospitality and politics in Cyprus.1 Significant to Lapithi’s work are autobiographical experiences and the geopolitical division of Cyprus. Born in 1963 in Cyprus, Lapithi experienced at a young age the traumatic 1974 division of Cyprus and the on-going occupation of half of the island by Turkey.2 This article explores the significance of an orchestrated meal for the politics of belonging and remembering in contemporary Cyprus. It analyses the representation of the event by Lapithi, who engaged in questioning the meaning of peace by serving food as a ‘medium’ and as a ‘symbol of peace’. It also explores Lapithi’s strategies in communicating her own memories and experiences as a refugee who can visit her family’s house over the occupied northern side of Cyprus only as a guest. Through the discussion of food/taste and visuals, this article will consider how the dinner acts as a means of catharsis for the participants and develops a critical understanding of contemporary events in Cyprus and our reaction to them.
    • Life Goes On

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (17/06/2016)
      Digital collage artworks included in group show: Juxtaposition an exhibition of contemporary collage and video art at The Museum of Club Culture, 17th June - July 10th. Curated by Mark Wigan and Kerry Baldry.
    • Limited edition screenprint

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2015-02)
      My work explores themes of humour, word play, narrative and visual storytelling. Focus is on the use of Illustration to explore personal voice and the extent that this can be applied to processes whilst retaining visual identity. I am interested in the process of Illustration and experimentation in various outputs, this is currently leading me into further visual treatment such as 3d laser cut artworks and ceramics.
    • The long commute

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2015-11)
      The Long Commute , is a screen-printed illustration submitted for the,‘Tales of the City' Cheltenham Illustration Awards, University of Gloucestershire. This work was inspired by the journey taken each morning from the country to the city and the differing experiences encountered along the way.
    • Luddite Drawings: a series of drawings (3) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘From Here & There: drawings from Colorado and Wales.

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Luddite Drawings is a series of three A1 drawings made with pencil and carbon paper and using guides made in Adobe Indesign. Each drawing consist of two sets of closely aligned lines that cross each other at right angles. Luddite Drawings explores ideas around drawing, work, craft, repetition, copying and the presence and performance of the body in the drawing process. In making the drawings I set myself rules that I could not meet. I devised a game that pitched the production of the drawing against factors like tiredness, concentration, measurement and correctness. My methodology was guided by Marina Warner’s writing about play and the haptic qualities of making and experiential learning, David Pye’s theory of ‘the workmanship of risk and the workmanship of certainty’ and Tim Inglold’s notions of Wayfaring and Transport. The completed drawings were digitised and printed as A2 Giclée prints for the exhibition From Here and There: Drawings from Colorado and Wales. The exhibition was part of an international exchange of contemporary drawings between artists in Colorado and Wales. Exhibition catalogue available.
    • Lusitania: Beneath the surface.

      McMahon, Daithi; O'Connor, Fred; University of Derby (Radio Kerry, 2014-12)
      After the RMS Lusitania is sunk by a German U-boat off the south-west coast of Ireland in 1915 the people of the Blasket Islands in Co Kerry rallied to save as many souls as possible and nurse them back to health. This is the story of how one of those survivors unsettles the peaceful islands as his dark past is quickly catching up with him after an investigation is launched into the sinking.
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (09/09/2011)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.
    • Manifest destiny, violence and transcendence – an artist’s statement

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (University of Salford Press, 2012)
      My principal area of interest is using digital media within a cross-disciplinary methodology that incorporates drawing, painting, collage, typography, moving image and writing.The primary theme that concerns the work contained within the exhibition is the human psychologies’ innate need to transcend the isolation of individual existence. Particular focus is given to the destructive and violent expressions of that need from a societal perspective. This central premise underpins the attempt to explore various sociological phenomena, historical and contemporary, related to authoritarianism, conformity and armed conflict.