• 'I Speak about Myself to You' – Renegotiating the Voice of Documentary through Animation Aesthetics

      Bosward, Marc; Bevan, Greg; University of Derby; University of Salford (The Higher Education Academy, 23/06/2011)
      Documentary practice has long been encumbered with journalistic and pseudo-scientific expectations; the gathering of evidence, the balancing of material and the objective presentation of accurate and informative data. Overwhelmingly, documentary audiences are encouraged to believe in an objective reality and, by extension, to anticipate fidelity to it. Filmmakers' aesthetic choices are selected and organised to persuade the viewer that the resulting voice of the documentary is an honest, rational and sensible point of view. This paper will explore the documentary filmmaker's detachment from an obligation to deliver objective truth by applying the visual, aural and temporal distortions of animation to interrogate conventional notions of knowledge, reliability and authority. By taking a collaborative approach to the research project, the paper will explore the inherent transformative, non-representational and illusory nature of animation in relation to the construction of authorial voice for documentary. Drawing on the theory and practice of filmmakers Aleksandr Sokurov and Alexander Kluge, the paper will assess to what extent truth can be derived from expressionistic aesthetic components as readily as they can from the narration of factual information and photographic reality; can animation in documentary assimilate fiction into fact and synthesise truth and fantasy? Further, the paper will argue that the didactic voice of traditional, expository documentary encourages passive observation while animation can provoke a more poetic interpretation of the films' diegesis; how can the authenticity of documentary material be legitimised by foregrounding authorial mediation rather than attempting to camouflage subjectivity? The introduction of animation aesthetics into documentary realism offers the filmmaker a wider choice of expressive tools to define, extend and affirm their own personal voice. This paper will offer a practical assessment of these issues, offering new approaches for filmmakers to explore the epistemological resonance of their craft, and to extend the formal and thematic parameters that determine documentary's status as nonfiction testimony.
    • Igniting imagination through darkness: discovering fear and fantasy through shadows, silence and the invisible.

      Slabbert, Barend; Jordaan, June; Cape Peninsula University of Technology (Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2016)
      Darkness invites imagination. On the one hand, it creates intimacy. It has been observed by many artforms that we feel the need to close off our vision during intense emotional experiences, during dreaming, listening to music, or caressing our loved ones. Shadows can be seen to do this for us, as they dim vision and entice unconscious peripheral vision and tactile fantasy. On the other hand, darkness entices fear. A person, who is afraid of the dark, writes Finnish architect Palasmaa, has no factual reason to fear darkness as such; he is afraid of his own imagination. Darkness, or the lack of light, is also often accompanied by silence and has the ominous ability to render the visible invisible. To probe the experience of darkness, this paper will refer to the philosophical position of phenomenology. In this regard, darkness is seen as a phenomenon that is experienced through our bodily senses. The phenomenology of darkness will be investigated be making reference to the way we project ourselves onto architectural spaces, also known as ‘mimesis of the body’. Furthermore, it will be investigated how our perceptions, memories and imaginings of past experiences influence such projections. This paper hopes to show how the relation between imagination, our mental faculty that forms images of external concepts not present to the senses, and darkness, can be understood by interpreting spatial narratives of architectural interiors. A selection of evocative interiors will be interpreted in terms of three factors that contribute to the phenomenology of darkness: shadows, silence, and the invisible. By doing so, this paper hopes to indicate how darkness has strong existential expressions that can be incorporated into spatial narratives in architectural interiors.
    • Illustrated worlds

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (Association of Illustrators, 2013-10)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual ‘world’ that is manifest across an illustrator’s output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator’s use of visual language in constructing virtual, illustrated worlds.Drawing from a range of contemporary examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world’s diegesis. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives.
    • Illustrated worlds, virtual environments and authorial voice

      Bosward, Marc; Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2013-01)
      The practice of the contemporary illustrator is no longer exclusively defined by the traditional orthodoxies of the commissioner and illustrator relationship. Contemporary Illustration has expanded the parameters of the discipline to include toys, games, animation, collectable objects, fashion and other forms of media and merchandising. This multi-disciplinary and authorial practice is often predicated on the creation of an identifiable, virtual 'world' that is manifest across an illustrator's output, independent of variations in audience, purpose and subject matter. This paper will explore the illustrator's use of visual language in constructing virtual worlds that define authorial voice. Drawing from a range of contemporary and historical examples, the paper will explore the capacity of illustration to generate a virtual world that engages and absorbs its audience. How does an illustrator use the language of exaggeration, distortion, symbolism and metaphor to construct a system of coherent signifiers that constitute a world that is repeatedly revisited across their practice? The paper will argue that a sense of place established through non-representational approaches can address the actual, socio-historical world through the interpretation of the constructed world's diegesis. An analysis of contemporary illustration in its relationship to genre and authorship will be discussed in relation to this premise. The paper will also consider how a world is realised across personal and commercial outputs and the interrelationship and interface of authorial and commercial imperatives. The paper will offer an assessment of these issues, offering approaches for illustrators to explore the intellectual, psychological and emotional resonance of illustrated worlds, and to extend the formal and thematic parameters that determine illustration's status as a narrative form.
    • Illustrating Corsica: The modernist landscape of John Minton's Time Was Away.

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (Intellect Ltd., 01/04/2018)
      The article considers John Minton’s (1917–57) illustrations of landscape for the book Time Was Away: A Notebook in Corsica (1948) with an aim to recover their significance in the history of illustration. Certain illustrations are positioned as notable for their ambiguous relationship to the text. I elaborate thinking around text–image relations alongside questions concerning the cross-fertilization of fine art and illustration. In their adoption of modernist principles, Minton’s illustrations are significant in recasting the role of illustration in the artistic context of post-war Britain. In melding formalist effects with realist concerns, the illustrations raise broader matters around realism, fine art and the democratic potential of illustration. I show that in seizing on cinematic techniques, Minton offers an effectively modern response to the traditional paradigm of depth associated with landscape and thereby proffers an alternative to the Modernist paradox that a teleological development of painting is at odds with landscape.
    • Immersive deconstruction: An exploration of dynamic loop-based performance diffused in a multi-channel environment.

      Vandemast-Bell, Paul; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Kling Gut Symposium, 10/06/2017)
      This performance at klingt gut! 3rd International Symposium on Sound by the audio-visual duo, Time.lus, explores (through live interaction) the dynamic dialogue between rhythmic, audio-visual materials in space. Original source material is presented then deconstructed and improvisationally reimagined in real-time, to create synchronous / asynchronous rhythms and textures. The work is evolved through the use of audio-visual effects and dynamic processors.
    • Inside my head.

      Levesley, Richard; University of Derby (2016-11)
    • Inside-outside: 3-D music through tissue conduction

      McKenzie, Ian; Lennox, Peter; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (24/03/2015)
      Eliciting an auditory perception by means of mechanical transduction bypassing the peripheral hearing apparatus has been recorded as early as the 16th century. Excluding its audiometric use to assess ear pathology, bone and soft tissue conduction has received very little interest until the last two decades. Previous work during this time (Stanley and Walker 2006, MacDonald and Letowski 2006) has indicated robust lateralization is feasible via mechanical transduction. We have extended this, adding the front-back and up-down axes.
    • Interactive sound fountains

      Locke, Caroline (25/11/2011)
    • Introduction

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby; Arts Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby, UK (Taylor and Francis, 15/08/2018)
      This is the introduction for The Alternative Document, a special edition of Studies in Theatre and Performance edited by Angela Bartram. The edition contains essays by Angela Bartram, Emma Cocker and Clare Thornton, Kate Corder, Steve Dutton, Rochelle Haley, Sophie Kromholz, Una Lee, Andrew Pepper and Louise K. Wilson.
    • Investigating spatial music qualia through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; University of Derby (Aalto University, 2017-07)
      A spatial array of vibro-mechanical transducers for bone-and-tissue conduction has been used to convey spatial ambisonic soundscape and spatial musical material. One hundred volunteers have undergone a five-minute listening experiences, then have described the experience in their own words, on paper, in an unstructured elicitation exercise. The responses have been aggregated to elicit common emergent descriptive themes, which were then mapped against each other to identify to what extent the experience was valuable, enjoyable and informative, and what qualia were available through this technique. There appear to some substantive differences between this way of experiencing music and spatial sound, and other modes of listening. Notably, the haptic component of the experience appears potentially informative and enjoyable. We conclude that development of similar techniques may have implications for augmented perception, particularly in respect of quality of life (QoL) in cases of conductive hearing loss.
    • Itajime gasuri: digital warps

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (World Shibori Network, 31/10/2014)
      Itajime gasuri is a Japanese resist technique, which today is almost extinct but was originally employed to patterned warp yarns by clamping them between two boards engraved in high relief. When the clamped bundle was then immersed in a dye-bath, the dye was unable to penetrate into the areas under pressure and the resulting dyed and finally woven cloth produced an ikat like pattern. A process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase production of the labor intensive textile dyeing technique ikat was re-discovered by the highly skilled Craftsman and Japanese weaver Norio Koyama, who in 1996 when visited in Japan was the only remaining craftsperson to still employ on a commercial level, the traditional process of itajime gasuri: the utilization of identically carved wooden boards to resist pattern fabrics. As a silk weaver, Norio Koyama, became interested in the process of itajime gasuri having purchased the last remaining full set of traditional clamping boards. Teaching himself the intricate and precise processes involved with the technique and required to produce lengths of fabric with patterns similar to double 'ikat'. A present of eight old boards to the author enabled the technique to spread to Europe and has enabled further research to be carried out into the processes involved and along side advancements in digital technology provided an opportunity to reinvent the process by employing old or newly digitally machined boards to produce modern versions of such textiles, which when combined with digital technology in the form of image manipulation and digital printing both onto prepared fabric bases and warps prior to weaving has enabled the process to reinvent itself and design qualities achieved with such a technique evolve into a patterning method for the 21st Century. The excitement occurs when a process invented by Tomoshicihi Miura in 1837 to copy and increase textile production of the resist dyeing technique ikat can be once again employed to create textile designs if new Itajime gasuri boards are created with digital manufacturing techniques and digital scanning along side digital printed will once woven produce an ikat effect: A complete cycle of creativity and innovation being achieved.
    • Jane Eyre's Arrival at Thornfield Hall: Illustration of Jane Eyre’ arrival at Thornfield Hall

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (2014-06)
      The illustration was awarded first prize in the illustration section of the Brontë Society creative competition. The print submitted for the Brontë creative competition investigated and examined the use of hand drawn elements in a predominantly photographic printing process and how this might be developed and disseminated to the design student cohort through my teaching using the photogravure method of creating mark-making. The work has been viewed at local, national and international levels by those interested in the works of the Bronte’s and the research could potentially give a greater understanding of the history and literature of the Bronte’s to general art enthusiasts and a wider public audience. Also published in Bronte Studies January 2015 40 (1)
    • John Minton’s "Time was away: A notebook in Corsica"

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (10/11/2016)
      The paper examines the range in Minton’s approach at two levels. Firstly, it considers his dual strategies of Romanticism and Realism. Minton conflates topographical concerns with Neo-Romantic tendencies and draws on the landscape traditions of the sublime and picturesque, and the trope of the figure in the landscape. Secondly, the paper examines the images within a register of autonomy. Some images, operate autonomously, procuring primarily aesthetic responses; in contrast, others demand more literal intertextual readings; still, a further category of semi autonomous images are identified which subtly evoke elements of the text, without being hostage to Ross’s prose. These works in particular, I argue, invite the reader/viewer to re-assemble text and image so as to re-envision and re-imagine the Corsican Landscape. By examining text-image relationships, the place of landscape in post-war illustration, collaborative practice, and the relationship between fine art and illustration, the paper aims to contribute to forwarding the theorisation of illustration.
    • Jonathan Vickers and Kerri Pratt

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (WordPress, 21/07/2014)
      2014 Jonathan Vickers Award winner Kerri Pratt, her work and circumstances relating to the award.
    • Journeys, pathways and track plans

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2014-10)
      Journeys - a 2 week contemporary art exhibition based around the idea of the various forms a journey can take, be that physical, of the mind or imagination. Ecopsychology is a psychological subfield that looks at the relationship between human beings and their environment, embracing a more revolutionary paradigm: just as Freud believed that neuroses were the consequences of dismissing deep rooted sexual and aggressive instincts, eco-psychologists believe that grief, despair and anxiety are the consequences of dismissing equally deep rooted ecological instincts.’ It is this connection between the human psyche and nature that is being explored. ‘In the Drowned World’ a recent series of images taken on walks along the track-bed of a disused railway feature labyrinthine, tangled and sometimes menacing vegetation inspired by the paintings of Max Ernst, alluding to Ballardian themes of nature’s retribution. The large scale image is printed on duratrans mounted on opaque Perspex and fixed to the outside of a window, the impression being of the tangled vegetation viewed through the window.
    • Karri Pratt: Our treasure houses

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 2015-09)
      Kerri Pratt’s paintings have references to curious spaces derived from man-made, industrial and urban landscapes. Drawing on childhood memories of growing up in an ex-mining town, when the demise of previously thriving industries of Collieries, Potteries, Pipeworks and Brickworks were all too prominent. Kerri has reconnected with her home county of Derbyshire to produce a new series of paintings referencing remnants and traces of our industrial heritage.
    • The kites are flying

      Hunt, Ava; Maggie Ford; University of Derby (2013-05)
      A television reporter’s experience in the West Bank reveals how children’s hopes and dreams for peace can fly higher than any wall dividing communities and religions. Why won’t Said speak? Why does he make beautiful kites and let them loose in the wind? Following actor Ava Hunt and Director Maggie Ford’s recent visit filming in the West Bank, join us for this new one-woman multimedia performance, bringing this beautiful story alive with laughter, thrills and tears to a land where friendship has no barriers.
    • Layers of meaning, layers of truth: fragmented histories and composited video collage

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (Royal College of Art, 14/05/2016)
      The paper will present a body of ongoing practice-based research that interrogates the interface of live-action and animation, specifically, how found footage as an indexical element of lived experience functions within the aesthetic of a constructed ‘other’ world. Particular focus is given to how video collage, containing found footage components composed in the spatial as well as temporal dimensions, construct non-fiction explorations of the socio-historical world from an ontological perspective. The research explores how found footage elements are deployed to address themes relating to memory and history, with regard to how collective impressions of history are constituted and socially assimilated.