• Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • Finding lines

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 15/07/2017)
      A series of 10 drawings and one video (titled Faint/Feint) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘Finding Lines – A Celebration Of Drawing And Mark Making’ at Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The ten drawings for Finding Lines are not drawings, they are carbon copies made with small sheets of typewriter carbon paper placed underneath the paper that will be drawn on, and on top of a second sheet of paper which receives the impression of the drawing. Each drawing is made of a series of straight lines drawn with the aid of a set square. Faint/Feint privileges the most basic elements of drawing; pencil, line, paper and tool. The carbon copy is an ‘automatic’ record of the corporeal (and cognitive) act of drawing: it captures all the mistakes I make; the slips, smudges, misalignment and movement - and replicates them. The drawing is a poor performance of an activity that could easily be automated. I have approached drawing as a corporeal exercise that relies on concentration and stamina and which is always imperfect because in doing it I can never match the precision of the computer (although the carbon copy nods to the perfect copying of the photocopier and the printer). Faint/Feint 10 x A1 carbon copy drawings, 60gsm newsprint.
    • Flexible feedback project

      Draycott, Ann; Higson, Rob; University of Derby (21/10/2015)
      The project aimed to create a workflow which allowed tutors to provide students with access to feedback they could flexibly use to support their learning at times and in place of their choosing. It was envisaged that this workflow, or aspects of it, could be adapted by tutors within the University of Derby and beyond it to meet their needs and those of their students. A key consideration of the project was the need to create visual resources for students who worked in a very visual medium. Our aim was to create resources and processes which were accessible to them in terms of their individuals learning needs and abilities. The project was shortlisted as a finalist for the 2014 MEDEA awards in Brussels at the Flemish Ministry of Education Headquarters. It was selected out of 237 entries and the project was one of the 8 finalists from 29 countries.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • ‘The Found Footage Composite: History, Hybridity and the Animated World’

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/09/2016)
      The paper will describe a practical methodology designed to deploy found footage, animation, digital compositing and special effects techniques to critically evaluate the ontological status of found footage in reference to materiality and truth-value. In this framework, the construction of non-real spaces that synthesise animation and found footage are explored for their potential in describing alternate histories with regards to memory and ideology. How can the material aspects of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past?
    • Fractured pasts: Found footage collage and the animated documentary

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/06/2017)
      The paper will present a body of practice-led research within experimental documentary and animation that interrogates the use of found footage as a historiographical strategy. The research examines the capacity of found footage collage in articulating the layered temporalities present in the formation of collective recollection. How can the materiality of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past? The methodology draws from visual ethnography with regards to intersubjectivity, multivocality and the immaterial aspects of human experience. The approach aims to challenge notions of unitary meaning, objectivity and truth in historical representation. Can the fragmented, hybrid aesthetic of the moving collage render the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective pasts? The work deploys appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses. The paper will describe temporal structures that privilege simultaneity, overlap and layering in constructing unstable images that foreground a dialogical conception of the past. How can found footage collage and animation, as a historiographical practice, expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and time?
    • The Frequency Of Trees

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (Yorkshire Sculpture Park, 2014-10)
      The Frequency Of Trees is part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) Open Air collection and has an extremely large footfall (700,000 visitors during 2015/16). Public audiences engage with the research directly when walking through the grounds of the park. Spectators discuss how sound moves and how the body responds. The sculpture comprises of a series of 12 tuning forks tuned to the frequency of different trees within YSP: Oak, Horse Chestnut, Beech and the Cedar of Lebanon in the Formal Garden. The frequency of sound is measured by counting the number of occurrences of an event per unit of time. By measuring the number of times a branch or leaf on a tree moved a certain distance within a set time frame, Locke was able to equate tree movements with Hertz readings, the unit used to measure sound. After striking the tuning forks, spectators are required to listen for the resonating frequencies that continue long after the initial strike – these are the pure musical tones that exist after the initial high overtones recede. The commonly stated human hearing range is 20–16000Hz thus the 16Hz fork appears to have no sound, however , spectators can still enjoy the sight of sound by watching the fork resonate. The work is used as generator for learning on various educational programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park .
    • Friends and feelings: the appropriation of Facebook by Irish radio stations to enhance audience engagement through affective media experiences

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Lund University and University of Westminster, 2016)
      Radio audiences have become increasingly interested in engaging with radio stations via social network sites (SNS), finding radio station Facebook pages as a source of information, entertainment and as a channel for audience participation. Meanwhile in an attempt to remain viable in an increasingly digital mediascape radio station management have appropriated Facebook and other SNSs to create a broader media experience for their audiences. This has involved moving radio stations beyond simple audio broadcasters to become digital media producers, adding visual and highly interactive dimensions to their arsenal. The adoption of Facebook by the Irish radio industry has been driven by commercial forces with station management engaging with audiences via Facebook to help grow online and on-air audience numbers with the goal of increasing revenue. Using the Irish radio industry as a case study this research found that some radio stations are more adept at engaging with their audiences than others. Those stations that employ the medium effectively are connecting with audiences on an emotional level, evoking feelings and instigating affective communication between users. The focus of this research resides at the nexus of radio industry trends, audience engagement experiences and radio production practices, all of which have changed as a result of the adoption of Facebook and other SNSs by the Irish radio industry. This research involved in-depth analysis of three radio stations including commercial and public service stations broadcasting to local, regional and national audiences. The methodology included analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals and an audience survey of N=419 radio listeners/Facebook users. This research forms part of the author’s doctoral thesis which explores the social, economic and cultural implications of Facebook use by Irish radio stations and their audiences.
    • From pillar to post

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-03)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. ‘From Pillar to Post’ was a digital animated film displayed at Strutt’s Mill Belper using projection-mapping technology as part of the launch for the refurbished and remodeled exhibition spaces.
    • From Pillar to Post (and back again): animation projection mapped onto the basement pillars of Strutt’s North Mill, Belper for a Museums at Night Event.

      Shore, Tim; Bosward, Marc; Mellor, Shane; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-05)
      From Pillar to Post (and back again) was projected onto eight of the monumental mill-stone grit piers in the basement of Strutt’s North Mill - the pillars are all that is left of Jedediah Strutt’s first mill of 1786 that burnt down in 1803 – they form the foundation of the ‘new’ mill built in 1804. The abstract animation was composed of short sequences of choreographed blocks of light and colour that was mapped on to the blocky rectangular geometry of the pillars. The animation playback was synched to an audio track using Isadora software. Visitors were able to walk between the pillars affecting the animation by breaking the projection light beam and changing the animation sequences by adding their own audio in the form of shouting, clapping and stamping. Pillar to Post (and back again) created an immersive animation that the audience were able to walk into and affect by interrupting the audio track by making random sounds that changed the order and play of the animation. The audience were able to perform the animation.
    • From surround to true 3-D

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; Vaughan, John; University of York (Audio Engineering Society, 1999-04)
      To progress from surround sound to true 3-D requires an updating of the psychoacoustical theories which underlie current technologies. This paper shows how J.J.Gibson’s ecological approach to perception can be applied to audio perception and used to derive 3-D audio technologies based on intelligent pattern recognition and active hypothesis testing. These technologies are suggested as methods which can be used to generate audio environments that are believable and can be explored.
    • The GASP project: Guitars with ambisonic spatial production.

      Werner, Duncan; University of Derby (2016)
      The GASP 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. GASP is an ongoing project where research into guitar performance utilising multiple individually processed string timbres, generated by our multichannel guitars, in conjunction with virtual guitar processing software, and processed ambisonically, provides scope for alternative performance and production techniques; more information on the GASP system at: http://tinyurl.com/GASP-Derby
    • GASP v2: Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Box, Charlie; Dallali, Dominic; Hooley, Jack; Middlicott, Charlie; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group; University of Derby: Department of Media and Perfoming Arts (2016-06)
      The 2016 GASP v2 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance' project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 12th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Monday 4th July 2016. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby on 28th June 2016, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • Girls like that

      Lane, Kit; University of Derby (2015-02)
      A variety of source material was used including original photographic and video images, computer generated imagery and Creative Commons licensed images. Extensive use was made of projection mapping techniques. A wide-screen image was created at a short throw distance by edge-blending two projectors.
    • Green fingered.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Birmingham Open Media, 2015)
      In partnership with Birmingham Pride Festival. The exhibition explores the possibility that those of homosexual persuasion are more likely to have a visceral impact on the cultivation of plants. During studies of communal lesbian gardeners throughout the 1970’s, German botanist Dr. Gerda Haeckel observed accelerated growth, crop abundance and overall increased vegetational health. Green Fingered investigates the territory of this research and visually interprets its findings through a series of specially commissioned artworks. Pherometer (2015) is a site specific suspended device that purports to measure the gradient of ‘ARQP’ (Atmospheric Responsive Queer Pheromones) in its vicinity through sensory plants attached via complex wired conduits. The Seed Series (2015) meanwhile is a collection of eight photographic portraits of some of Haeckel’s original subjects and their finest vegetable specimens. Trans Tent (2015) is an immersive, freestanding installation structure, akin to a hothouse and occupied by flora that respond to interaction through vibration and sound. Within it features a continually evolving kaleidoscopic audiovisual instructional guide to the rudiments of successful queer botany and futuristic predictions to the sustainability of bio produce. Marmalade invites the LGBT community to become subjects in the Trans Tent installation during Birmingham Pride weekend (23 to 24 May). This new video artwork incorporates performative excerpts and appropriated material in a parodic and absurdist response to the educational programmes of Haeckel’s era. Green Fingered explores how research in the medical and social sciences has to date focused on trying to identify genetic and psychological traits relating to sexuality. At a time when research continues to find the ‘gay gene’, Green Fingered coalesces aspects of gender and cultural studies with biological science through provocative visual experimentation.
    • Green fingered: Seed series

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Various venues, 2016)
      Double Act: Art and Comedy explores how comedy helps us to shape meaning and negotiate the complexities of everyday life. Humour is a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance. But, what we find funny can also be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without. The show draws together artists from diverse cultural and political contexts, each sharing an interest in humour as a resource to animate their art practice and to connect with an audience.
    • Green fingered: Seed series.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Arquipelago Centro de Artes, 2017-09)
      The Laughable Enigma of Ordinary Life explores how comedy is important in shaping meaning, helping us negotiate the complexities of everyday life. What we find funny can be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without and vice-versa. But it is also a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance.
    • Guest talk: Be your dog.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (Live Art Development Agency, 16/05/2018)
      Shaun Caton’s Prancing Poodles and Preposterous Pugs is a visual tour through some of his extraordinary collection of vintage and historic photographs, and an illustrated talk exploring the animal as performer for the camera, live audience, and the collective creative imagination. Looking at bizarre photographs of animals both dead and alive, Shaun will evince their forgotten stories and pinpoint the human relationships within a performance context. Jack Tan’s Four Legs Good is a live revival of the medieval animal trials, where animals who had committed some offence were charged in court, prosecuted and defended by barristers, and sentenced in full hearings before a judge. In advance of the first sitting of the Animal Court at Compass Festival 2018 in Leeds, Jack will give a presentation about the Animal Court and offer advice to all dogs present who may have fallen foul of the law on how to bring or defend a case. Angela Bartram’s Be Your Dog explores relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept that two companions are necessary for a functional co-species co-habitation. The project saw participants and their dogs attend workshops to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection, and strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other and to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. She will talk about Be Your Dog and her other work with animals including the significance of dog/human cohabitation at the end of life, using dog walking as a way to engage community, and giving access to animal theory to animals themselves. Artist and researcher Sibylle Peters will facilitate conversations.
    • Hand on heart

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (29/09/2017)
      An Illustration created for Rankin Photography Studio, to promote British Heart Foundation, “World Heart Day” An international art project with creatives from around the world, to raise awareness of the global fight against heart disease through the use of social media.