• Education for innovation: exploring the place of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in Higher Education

      Wilson, Chris; Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (IETSD, 05/09/2012)
      This paper explores the increasing focus on the value of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in contemporary discourse and the challenge that this presents for established educational systems and traditional pedagogy. Through analysis of key literature and exploration od educational case studies, issues of definition and interpretation are explored in parallel with consideration of wider questions of operationalization and systemization. Focusing on how educational systems impact on the development and realization of these capacities through educational processes, the paper develops an overview of key perspectives, highlights examples of variation of interpretation of key terminology and presents points for consideration in the process of educational systems design. The paper concludes that there is an evident tension in educational models related to the definition and development of graduate attributes in particular but that there are educational strategies capabl;e of developing creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship as definable outcomes of learning and teaching processes.
    • An effective pedagogical practise for integrating HIV and AIDS into tertiary education: an interior design case study

      Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Gill, A; University of Johannesburg (South African Journal of Higher Education, 2017)
      This article discusses a pedagogical practise used to introduce HIV and AIDS content into an existing Interior Design curriculum from a creative praxis perspective. Curriculum-integration is a key strategy of the Higher Education HIV/AIDS Programme (HEAIDS), which was established to develop and support HIV-mitigation programmes at South Africa’s public Higher Education Institutions. Students within the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture at the University of Johannesburg engaged in a spatial intervention project that was structured around project-based learning strategies and constructivist teaching values. Students’ proposals were analysed against their ability to promote HIV and AIDS prevention and create appropriate meaning amongst the target group. The paper suggests that the methodology proved effective because it did not require radical curriculum transformation; aligned with existing programme outcomes; and demonstrated potential to contribute to the ‘new literacy of AIDS’ required to counter ‘AIDS fatigue’.
    • EG - Eugen Gomringer in the UK , 2011 - 2012

      Brown, Rodger; University of Derby (University of Derby and Research Group for Artists Publications (RGAP), 2011)
      The publication, EG - Eugen Gomringer in the UK , 2011 - 2012, is a catalogue/artists book in a limited edition of 150 copies. It contains essays by Patrick Ayres, Robert Richardson and Rodger Brown. It was conceived by Rodger Brown to accompany the following events (organised by Rodger Brown): Event 1 - Concept as Concrete Form: Visual Poetry, Texts and Typography Curated exhibition at UoD, including the work of Eugen Gomringer, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Dom Sylvester Houdard, Robert Lax, Eric Tabuchi, Karl Riha Event 2 - The Saisson Poetry Library, South Bank Centre, London Eugen Gomringer reading his work and in conversation with poet Harry Gilonis. Event 3 - De Montfort University, Leicester Re-hanging of Eugen Gomringer prints in the Francesco Conz Collection. Special opening with Eugen Gomringer. Event 4 - University of Derby, School of Art & Design Public Lecture by Eugen Gomringer, “The relationship of Concrete Art and Poetry” Event 5 - Shandy Hall, Coxwold, York “A day with Eugen Gomringer” Readings, lectures and informal conversation. Event 6 - The Scottish Poetry Library Eugen Gomringer in conversation with poet Thomas A Clark. Event 7 - Small Publishers Fair, Conway Hall, London Exhibition, “Concept as Concrete Form: Visual Poetry, Texts and Typography”.
    • Embodying the landscape

      Blackie, Sebastian; University of Derby (The Australian Ceramics Association, 2017-04)
    • The emotional contents of the ‘space’ in spatial music

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (International Conference on Music and Emotion, Durham, UK, 2009-09)
      Human spatial perception is how we understand places. Beyond understanding what is where (William James’ formulation of the psychological approach to perception); there are holistic qualities to places. We perceive places as busy, crowded, exciting, threatening or peaceful, calm, comfortable and so on. Designers of places spend a great deal of time and effort on these qualities; scientists rarely do. In the scientific world-view physical qualities and our emotive responses to them are neatly divided in the objective-subjective dichotomy. In this context, music has traditionally constituted an item in a place. Over the last two decades, development of “spatial music” has been within the prevailing engineering paradigm, informed by psychophysical data; here, space is an abstract, Euclidean 3-dimensional ‘container’ for events. The emotional consequence of spatial arrangements is not the main focus in this approach. This paper argues that a paradigm shift is appropriate, from ‘music-in-a-place’ to ‘music-as-a-place’ requiring a fundamental philosophical realignment of ‘meaning’ away from subjective response to include consequences-in-the-environment. Hence the hegemony of the subjective-objective dichotomy is questioned. There are precedents for this, for example in the ecological approach to perception (Gibson). An ecological approach to music-as-environment intrinsically treats the emotional consequences of spatio-musical arrangement holistically. A simplified taxonomy of the attributes of artificial spatial sound in this context will be discussed.
    • Engaging in pedagogic and artistic practice in a learning theatre

      Daly, Darren; Barth, Caroline; Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2015)
      This is a case study of the Learning Theatre, identifying some of the challenges and successes of its collaborative HE projects.The presentation was part of a conference investigating partnerships between HEIs and Professional Theatres. It gives an overview of some of the learning initiatives that the theatre operates and the concept of the Learning Theatre and then focusses on a case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative within this context. The research is focussed on student experience throughout the process and identifies key considerations for the development of the scheme and the partnership.
    • Entries on the L word and true blood.

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (Syracuse University Press., 13/11/2018)
      Entires on the finales of television series: The L word and True Blood as part of a collection on finales.
    • Ephemeral art and documenting the un-documentable.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (06/07/2018)
      Concerned with the ephemeral and how it is perceived when lost to the fractures of time, Peggy Phelan suggests “you have to be there.” Phelan states that ephemera, specifically performance “become[s] itself through disappearance,” which draws empathy with Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “aura of the original.” In practice this a less than pragmatic account of the reality of experiencing such artworks, for how can they exist beyond the moment of making if not recorded, in order to map their histories? Archival devices are however, problematic, for how do we suitably record the remains of these artworks that, by their very premise, deny longevity and fixity? This paper interrogates the critical, sensitive and individualized distance necessary when capturing ephemeral artwork to allow it to remain true to intent. Moving beyond the disciplinary ghettos of event and documentation, it interrogates how divergent and sympathetic modes of practice allow for a greater level of sustainable critique. This complex and problematic terrain will be analysed to question if appropriate documents, with the varied and differing demands of works of art, can ever be possible. Based on artworks within ‘The Alternative Document’ exhibition (Project Space Plus, Lincoln UK, 2016, which I curated to include a collection of archival documents reconfigured as new artworks) I discuss the potential for legacy beyond formal and traditional means. Through this, I will suggest how it is possible to move beyond formal academic, artistic and museological conventions when documenting and re-staging ephemeral art.
    • The experiment

      Lahav, Vered; University of Derby (New Art WM, 2015)
      Mixed media kinetic installation. Glass, wood and feathers.The SALON exhibition at The Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Edmund Street offered over 100 works of contemporary art for sale by 80 artists from the West Midlands and beyond between 13 November to 22 December 2015. Works included paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, book and film. SALON was the second selling exhibition organised by New Art WM this year offering audiences a unique chance to see and buy contemporary art by a wide range of artists at a range of prices starting at £20.
    • Exploring real world learning through Company Aside

      Daly, Darren; Barth, Caroline; Shelton, Fiona; University of Derby (2014)
      This is a case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative at Derby Theatre focussed on its efficacy as a learning model. The presentation was part of The University of Derby’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment conference on Pedagogies for The Future. It is an evaluative case study of the ‘Company Aside’ initiative as a learning model. The research was drawn from focus group discussions and questionnaires with students and professionals engaged on the programme, identifying key challenges, successes and considerations for further development.
    • Exploring the benefits of surround sound in contemporary live music performances

      Crossley, John; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 2016-06)
      Spatial audio utilizing 5.1 surround sound and newer developments such as object oriented audio has become well established in cinema and home theaters. The expansion of this into live musical performance is quite limited. This work explores the benefits of surround sound for contemporary music performance. A 20-channel Wavefield synthesis system was compared to a high quality stereo sound reinforcement system under identical experimental conditions. An original composition was used to avoid familiarity with program material and to encourage focus on spatial considerations. Data drawn from audiences at both performances is used to quantify the perceptual differences for the average audience and to draw conclusions as to the usefulness of using a system of this type in an “average” contemporary live music performance.
    • Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • Finding lines

      Shore, Tim; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 15/07/2017)
      A series of 10 drawings and one video (titled Faint/Feint) that explore process, performance and gesture, selected for the group exhibition ‘Finding Lines – A Celebration Of Drawing And Mark Making’ at Derby Museum and Art Gallery. The ten drawings for Finding Lines are not drawings, they are carbon copies made with small sheets of typewriter carbon paper placed underneath the paper that will be drawn on, and on top of a second sheet of paper which receives the impression of the drawing. Each drawing is made of a series of straight lines drawn with the aid of a set square. Faint/Feint privileges the most basic elements of drawing; pencil, line, paper and tool. The carbon copy is an ‘automatic’ record of the corporeal (and cognitive) act of drawing: it captures all the mistakes I make; the slips, smudges, misalignment and movement - and replicates them. The drawing is a poor performance of an activity that could easily be automated. I have approached drawing as a corporeal exercise that relies on concentration and stamina and which is always imperfect because in doing it I can never match the precision of the computer (although the carbon copy nods to the perfect copying of the photocopier and the printer). Faint/Feint 10 x A1 carbon copy drawings, 60gsm newsprint.
    • Flexible feedback project

      Draycott, Ann; Higson, Rob; University of Derby (21/10/2015)
      The project aimed to create a workflow which allowed tutors to provide students with access to feedback they could flexibly use to support their learning at times and in place of their choosing. It was envisaged that this workflow, or aspects of it, could be adapted by tutors within the University of Derby and beyond it to meet their needs and those of their students. A key consideration of the project was the need to create visual resources for students who worked in a very visual medium. Our aim was to create resources and processes which were accessible to them in terms of their individuals learning needs and abilities. The project was shortlisted as a finalist for the 2014 MEDEA awards in Brussels at the Flemish Ministry of Education Headquarters. It was selected out of 237 entries and the project was one of the 8 finalists from 29 countries.
    • Forge

      Bosward, Marc; Shore, Tim; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014)
      Site-specific projection pieces exploring the architecture and history of the Derwent Valley Mills. The ‘Forge’ installation was part of the DerwentWISE ‘Pulse’ project and was installed in partnership with Quad, Derby. The collaborative work will be developed further through planned engagement with a range of national and international locations and historical narratives, with particular reference to industrialization and the societal impact of technological development.
    • ‘The Found Footage Composite: History, Hybridity and the Animated World’

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/09/2016)
      The paper will describe a practical methodology designed to deploy found footage, animation, digital compositing and special effects techniques to critically evaluate the ontological status of found footage in reference to materiality and truth-value. In this framework, the construction of non-real spaces that synthesise animation and found footage are explored for their potential in describing alternate histories with regards to memory and ideology. How can the material aspects of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past?
    • Fractured pasts: Found footage collage and the animated documentary

      Bosward, Marc; University of Derby (02/06/2017)
      The paper will present a body of practice-led research within experimental documentary and animation that interrogates the use of found footage as a historiographical strategy. The research examines the capacity of found footage collage in articulating the layered temporalities present in the formation of collective recollection. How can the materiality of found footage be deployed within spatial and temporal collage films that challenge linear notions of memory and the past? The methodology draws from visual ethnography with regards to intersubjectivity, multivocality and the immaterial aspects of human experience. The approach aims to challenge notions of unitary meaning, objectivity and truth in historical representation. Can the fragmented, hybrid aesthetic of the moving collage render the partial and irregular experience of remembering, evoking the contingent and furtive conditions of personal and collective pasts? The work deploys appropriation strategies that decontextualize and recontextualise found footage as a method of ideological interruption, releasing the mutable, multiple meanings that accumulate and shift in the confluence of competing discourses. The paper will describe temporal structures that privilege simultaneity, overlap and layering in constructing unstable images that foreground a dialogical conception of the past. How can found footage collage and animation, as a historiographical practice, expand the language of non-fiction films that address memory and time?
    • The Frequency Of Trees

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (Yorkshire Sculpture Park, 2014-10)
      The Frequency Of Trees is part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) Open Air collection and has an extremely large footfall (700,000 visitors during 2015/16). Public audiences engage with the research directly when walking through the grounds of the park. Spectators discuss how sound moves and how the body responds. The sculpture comprises of a series of 12 tuning forks tuned to the frequency of different trees within YSP: Oak, Horse Chestnut, Beech and the Cedar of Lebanon in the Formal Garden. The frequency of sound is measured by counting the number of occurrences of an event per unit of time. By measuring the number of times a branch or leaf on a tree moved a certain distance within a set time frame, Locke was able to equate tree movements with Hertz readings, the unit used to measure sound. After striking the tuning forks, spectators are required to listen for the resonating frequencies that continue long after the initial strike – these are the pure musical tones that exist after the initial high overtones recede. The commonly stated human hearing range is 20–16000Hz thus the 16Hz fork appears to have no sound, however , spectators can still enjoy the sight of sound by watching the fork resonate. The work is used as generator for learning on various educational programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park .
    • Friends and feelings: the appropriation of Facebook by Irish radio stations to enhance audience engagement through affective media experiences

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Derby (Lund University and University of Westminster, 2016)
      Radio audiences have become increasingly interested in engaging with radio stations via social network sites (SNS), finding radio station Facebook pages as a source of information, entertainment and as a channel for audience participation. Meanwhile in an attempt to remain viable in an increasingly digital mediascape radio station management have appropriated Facebook and other SNSs to create a broader media experience for their audiences. This has involved moving radio stations beyond simple audio broadcasters to become digital media producers, adding visual and highly interactive dimensions to their arsenal. The adoption of Facebook by the Irish radio industry has been driven by commercial forces with station management engaging with audiences via Facebook to help grow online and on-air audience numbers with the goal of increasing revenue. Using the Irish radio industry as a case study this research found that some radio stations are more adept at engaging with their audiences than others. Those stations that employ the medium effectively are connecting with audiences on an emotional level, evoking feelings and instigating affective communication between users. The focus of this research resides at the nexus of radio industry trends, audience engagement experiences and radio production practices, all of which have changed as a result of the adoption of Facebook and other SNSs by the Irish radio industry. This research involved in-depth analysis of three radio stations including commercial and public service stations broadcasting to local, regional and national audiences. The methodology included analysis of Facebook page content, interviews with industry professionals and an audience survey of N=419 radio listeners/Facebook users. This research forms part of the author’s doctoral thesis which explores the social, economic and cultural implications of Facebook use by Irish radio stations and their audiences.