• A cage for the muse and the limits of invention

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      This paper explores the notion that creativity in the arts, particularly music, benefits from constraints. Expressive freedom is often fostered within education to encourage the pursuit of artistic individualism, but straying too far from stylistic norms can often engender incoherence. This paper does not challenge the breaking of rules that define a style nor does it denigrate the benefits that may arise from conflicting ideas and unusual combinations, but explores the virtue and benefits of boundaries and suggests that freedom, from a creative perspective, is often an illusory construct; strong creative identities are achievable through and often defined by creative constraints. Conclusions focus on the potential profits of constraints that bind expressive ideas and the function and virtue of intuition within the creative process; theorizing upon whether creative confinement, or the awareness thereof, is ultimately a liberating or inhibiting experience. We determine that artistic creative freedom as a concept may indeed be illusory, but the perception of freedom for some is a necessary ingredient in the creative act.
    • Care + attend.

      Watts, Lisa; University of Derby (Society of Artistic Research, 2015-02)
      Care + Attend comprises a constellation of fragments and extracts - of different intensities and durations - where the exposition of research emerges as poetic and performative, generating moments of potential resonance and dialogue. We explore the theme Unconditional Love through the principles (perhaps even methodologies) of care and attention, as applied within specific (artistic) practices of both the everyday and of the self. Beginning with the observation that both curate and curiosity have shared etymology in the term ‘care’, Care + Attend seeks to develop a research vocabulary based on receptivity, openness, fidelity, integrity, intimacy, friendship and commitment (whilst not ignoring the parallel principles of distraction, inattention, the act of closing one’s eyes or of looking away). Cocker and Lee have invited a range of artists & writers to share and reflect on their own processes, philosophies and politics of care and attention, and to present these through live performance, screenings and spoken word. Contributors include Kate Briggs, Daniela Cascella, Belén Cerezo, Emma Cocker, Steve Dutton + Neil Webb, Victoria Gray, Rob Flint, Mark Leahy, Joanne Lee, Martin Lewis, Sarat Maharaj, Brigid McLeer, Hester Reeve, and Lisa Watts [Society for Artistic Research website].
    • Causal contexts, cognitive cartoons and spatial sound

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; University of Derby (Qu e e n M a r y , U n i v e r s i t y o f L o n d o n, 20/12/2006)
      Based on previous work the proposal here is that spatial perception problems in artificial environments (e.g. spatial music displays) can be cast as a subset of the problems of cognitive mapping of the causal context that surrounds and supports the perceiver. The intuitively available distinctions in these contexts of foreground and background, previously couched in terms of perceptual significance exist as externally valid causal distinctions; the task of perception is to cognitively represent these distinctions sufficiently for appropriate interaction. Effectively, this means that some items will “naturally” occupy attention, whilst others should equally naturally appeal to background, inattentive processes. Hence, aspects of the causal context will be accorded differing cognitive resources according to their significance, and some may be very sparsely represented in cartoon form. That is, perception engages in sophisticated information reduction in cognitive representation in order to capitalise on available resources. This poster outlines how causal contexts (including spatial matters) can be physically cartoonified in reciprocal manner to the dedicated perceptual mechanisms’ operations, to economically and intuitively appeal to perception.
    • Ceramic sculpture of animals and birds

      James, Jeremy; University of Derby (2016)
      This show will feature a major new body of work by Jeremy James. Included for the first time are his linocuts of wildlife alongside his much loved ceramic sculpture. His subject matter ranges from all kinds of birds to animals such as hares, otters and meerkats. Jeremy divides his time between teaching and continuing to make and show work with many galleries nationally and internationally.
    • Chancel frequencies.

      Locke, Caroline; University of Derby (20-21 Arts Centre, 2015)
      Chancel Frequencies at 20-21 Arts Centre featured three works especially selected to respond to the former church building as a contemplative space, portraying images of sound, which are otherworldly, and designed to encourage contemplation. Circular projections show vibrations caused by different sound waves through water, filmed as part of her previous Sound Fountains project. In a new site specific work, three shallow steel pools made in the shape of the church window contain motors causing gentle ripples that will be reflected on the surrounding walls. Finally on a wall mounted screen, a film loop shows a single tuning fork shifting between 25Hz and 16Hz – made in connection with Frequency of Trees.This was a commissioned Exhibition at 20-21, from July 9th – October 9th 2015.
    • Clever Jack and the giants.

      Davidson, Susanna; Broadley, Leo; University of Derby (Usborne Publishing, 01/01/2015)
      A classic tale, retold for young readers. When poor Jack swots seven flies with a single blow, he can't wait to tell the world how brave he is. But he has to use his wits to defeat an angry collection of giants to become a real hero.
    • Cognitive maps and spatial sound

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2013-09)
      This presentation, accompanying a conference paper at the Audio Engineering Society's 52nd Annual Conference, is used as undergraduate teaching material at the University of Derby.The Paper paper discusses the applicability of the “cognitive map” metaphor to potential usages of artificial auditory environments. The theoretical contents of such maps are suggested. Maps are generally considered as having spatial, temporal, causal and territorial representational character, so that affordances in the environment can be utilized in timely fashion. A goal of this theorizing is that artificial auditory environments could appropriately represent affordances for interaction in entertainment, simulation and auditory cognitive training.
    • Collaborating animals: Dog and human artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (University of Adelaide, 2017)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University.
    • Collaborative animals: Dogs and humans as co-working artists.

      Bartram, Angela; University of Lincoln (Eastern Kentucky University, 2017-03)
      Be Your Dog was a Live Art Development Agency DIY funded project that aimed to explore and analyse relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner in response to Donna Haraway’s concept of two companions are necessary for a functional co-species cohabition. This is in response to scientific findings in animal behavioural studies that suggests hierarchy is unproductive in interspecies domestic cohabitation, and that non-human animals respond to other beings through emotional contagion and empathy. Palagi, Nicotra and Cordoni state in Rapid Mimicry and Emotional Contagion in Domestic Dogs “emotional contagion, a basic building block of empathy, occurs when a subject shares the same affective state of another,” which the project tests and explores with selected artists and their dogs. The project sees participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to be equals with each other, and with other pairs to test if it is possible to establish a non-hierarchical pack. Essentially, the project tests scientific findings through art practice, and concludes that it is possible to learn about, and relate to the cohabiting animals when empathy and equality is engaged instead of dominance. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. Analysis of Be Your Dog was presented as a video paper, ‘Collaborating Animals: Dog and Human Artists’ presented at Animal Intersections, at the 7th AASA Conference at University of Adelaide, 3-5 July 2017. Reworked video footage from the public event included in the conference’s accompanying exhibition at Peanut Gallery and Nexus Arts, Adelaide, 4-16 July 2017. Additionally, he paper, ‘Collaborative Animals: Dogs and Humans as Co-Working Artists, was presented at the conference ‘Living With Animals/Seeing with Animals, 22-26 March 2017 at Eastern Kentucky University. The project was housed by KARST, Plymouth, accompanying photographs by Dom Moore.
    • A collection of ten illustrations covering a variety of themes

      McNaney, Nicky; Levesley, Richard; Poynton, Stuart; University of Derby (2014-09)
      Exhibited at the Off Register Print Exhibition and the Wirksworth Festival. Artists from the wooden dog press collective exhibited artwork at the festival. The Wirksworth Festival aims to reach and create new audiences for contemporary visual art and encourage opportunities for participation and critical debate. The Festival makes a positive contribution to the community and economy of the area and is a key player in the artistic and cultural life of the region.
    • Composing and Capturing 3-D Soundscapes

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (2007-06)
    • Composing and capturing 3-D soundscapes

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2007-06)
      A poster report: A cohort of <50 final year BSc students were given access to proprietary hardware/software solutions to enable them to capture and manipulate large natural sound fields. Their task was to develop novel and innovative solutions to uncommon spatial sound problems. The results showed that it is theoretically possible to mount very large navigable sound fields and that the principles are (unlike domestic technologies) upwardly scalable to an unknown limit. The students had no technical precedents to follow, and developed their solutions empirically through ‘trial and error’ methods. They subsequently theoretically analysed the psychoacoustic results.
    • Composing space: the ecology of artificial auditory environments

      Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (University of Derby, 27/11/2012)
      Whilst various spatial formats for music reproduction exist their reason for existence is not always clear; “spatiality” as a set of musical parameters remains on the periphery of musical thought.Pioneering composers continue to explore the possibilities of spatial music, they sometimes face unnecessary (if not insurmountable) impediments in the form of unsuitable technological implementations. This work is part of on-going research to develop intuitive compositional spatial sound tools that can incorporate elements of naturally available spatiality into musical syntax. In highlighting unnecessary technical constraints that are underwritten by conceptual constraints, we hope to help to break the deadlock. We look forward to spatial composition becoming more ambitious, subtle, engaging, immersive and innovative.
    • Concepts of perceptual significance for composition and reproduction of explorable sound fields

      Lennox, Peter; Myatt, Tony; University of Derby; University of York (Schulich School of Music, McGill University, 26/06/2007)
      Recent work in audio and visual perception suggests that, over and above sensory acuities, exploration of an environment is a most powerful perceptual strategy. For some uses, the plausibility of artificial sound environments might be dramatically improved if exploratory perception is accommodated. The composition and reproduction of spatially explorable sound fields involves a different set of problems from the conventional surround sound paradigm, developed to display music and sound effects to an essentially passive audience. This paper is based upon contemporary models of perception and presents proposals for additional spatial characteristics beyond classical concepts of three-dimensional positioning of virtual objects.
    • Construction, storage, despatch

      Bevis, John; Cutts, Simon; Sackett, Colin; Brown, Rodger; Mustchin, Jill; Janssen, John; University of Derby; Rogers, Martin (Coracle Press, 2015)
      Publication to accompany the exhibition 'Martin Rogers: construction, storage, despatch' held at the University of Derby, 1 Feb 2016 - 8 April 2016 surveying the work of artist Martin Rogers. Edited by Simon Cutts of Coracle Press and containing essays by John Bevis with contributions from Rodger Brown, Jill Mustchin and David Ainley. Edition of 400 copies.
    • Construction, storage, despatch: The work of Martin Rogers

      Rogers, Martin; University of Derby; Brown, Rodger (2016)
      An exhibition of work charting the output of artist, Martin Rogers. The work of Martin Rogers (1952 – 2013) mediated between print, publishing, sculpture, sound art, installation, projection and photography. Martin was an artist of repute and for many years a member of staff on the Fine Art programme at the University of Derby. This exhibition draws together elements of his considerable artistic output, including sketchbooks, drawings, prints, publications and sculptures as well as archive and documentary material, all giving an insight into his eclectic output and approach. Displayed at various locations through the Markeaton Street building this exhibition offers an insight into the legacy Martin left behind as well as giving a flavour of the vast range and scope of his work.
    • Crafting the 3D object

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (2004-09)
      The presence of this kind of equipment, facility and knowledge in the Art School environment presents opportunities for areas of practice and discipline traditions that may not have come across them in the ordinary course of things. It also provides a centre of interest in considering the impact of new/emergent technologies on practices, traditions, and the role of the designer, craftsperson and artist. This paper takes a broad view of some of the issues involved in this, and has three main topics: - An account of how the specialist 3-D design and 3-D printing facilities are being opened up to other discipline areas through a staff development project. This includes staff from Fine Art disciplines, Applied Arts (jewellery), and Graphic Design and Illustration. This will be illustrated by examples of 3-D printed objects produced during a staff development activity to promote the facility and widen access to the broader curriculum. A reflection on the ways in which the further development and deployment of 3-D printing technologies (sintering and multi-material systems) may reframe the inter-relationships of consumer-object-designer, and may introduce the notion of bespoke manufacture. This re-defines what a designer does and their role in the development of a consumer object, and also re-defines the role of the consumer from a relatively passive purchaser selecting from a range of predefined objects, to a relatively active customer contributing to the particularities of the object as instance rather than as mass production. This is illustrated by a case study in which 'consumers' were invited to design/define an object, and 3-D printed objects of their outcomes.
    • Creative inhibition: how and why

      Lennox, Peter; Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE Conference Publications, 2016)
      The aim in this chapter is to develop discourse on how we think (consciously or subconsciously) about creativity, how we treat it, why we do so and whether we are behaving toward creativity to the best of our ability. The proposal is that rational inquiry can build on what has been achieved by intuitive thinking. It is almost axiomatic that the people who most often say the word “creative” are not the most creative; the corollary is that the most creative people find the least occasion to use the word. Talking about the job is not doing the job. For very creative people, creativity isn’t a subject, it’s imbued in the very fabric of their universe; it doesn’t need external validation, it is its own reason. For the rest of us, it is as though we are color blind – we understand intellectually what people are talking about, but we don’t, deep down, feel it. If we did, we wouldn’t have to talk about it. Yet, there is an advantage in this; necessity is the mother of invention. That which we do not easily understand through intuition, drives us to seek rational understanding.
    • Critical cloth

      Williams, Rhiannon; University of Derby (2015-10)
      A solo exhibition. Each patchwork entails a highlighting (or mutilation) of language and text that becomes intensified through tessellation within a stitched honeycomb framework. This strategy is one of selection and magnification, framing words, phrases and excerpts in such a way that a critique is suggested to the viewer. The intensity of hand stitching over long periods of time exaggerates the semiotic impact of each ‘snippet’ of text. In some pieces, the systematic recording of language becomes historical in a documentary sense. Money Talks, for example, showcases journalistic language generated during the Credit Crunch and beyond: ‘capitalism in crisis’, ‘recession’, ‘slump’, ‘financial gloom’, and more recently, ‘consumer confidence’, ‘road to recovery’, ‘austerity’ and ‘more cuts to come’.
    • Curious apothecary.

      McNaney, Nicky; University of Derby (14/10/2017)
      A artist book Curious Apothecary is published within in a Artist Book "Prescriptions " as part of a wider research project on artists’ books and the medical humanities, organised by the University of Kent and the University of New England (Maine Women Writers Collection), and supported by the Wellcome Trust. The book explores the role book arts can play in raising awareness of the richness and value of live accounts of illness.