Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • ‘The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few’ Support for children with SEND in times of austerity

    Bloor, Andy; university of derby (Routledge, 2020-10-20)
    This chapter considers some of the moral and theoretical perspectives around the debate surrounding the allocation of resources in schools in recent times. It examines if there are any moral imperatives around the debates on how we fund education for all children, but particularly those with a Special Educational Need and Disability (SEND). The author explores what responses we can and should make when faced with difficult choices around funding and what current theory and argument can do to support us in making considered, proactive, positive and empowering choices.
  • Spatial construction for ideational meaning: An analysis of interior design students’ multimodal projects

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; Gill, Andrew; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg (Cumulus, 2021-09-28)
    Multimodality is an inter-disciplinary approach that considers communication to be more than just language. Multimodal studies focus mostly on the analysis of twodimensional printed, digital, and screen production. This paper explores a multimodal pedagogic approach used to teach students to create interior design projects as threedimensional ensembles, which we reflect upon to contribute to the framework of multimodality. This qualitative research begins with a review of multimodal discourse establishing language as a system of choice, and a relationship between spatial design and language. A case-study of students’ multimodal ensembles reveals how the design choices of mode, semiotic resource, modal affordance and inter-semiosis led to students producing rich and inclusive meaning, supporting a reproductive health mandate. An interpretive semiotic framework based on Hallidayan principles of Systemic-functional linguistics is developed for spatial meaning-making analysis for future projects. The findings offer a narrative metalanguage for spatial meaning-making, contributing to broader interior design discourse.
  • Towards ‘regenerative interior design’: exploring a student project

    Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-09-28)
    Interior designers should design for regenerative systems in order to achieve advanced sustainability, beyond the current ‘neutral’ sustainable design approach. A broader and more positive regenerative design and development approach supports building social and natural capital within the new ecological paradigm. The interior design discipline has made little contribution to this agenda. This paper thus explores interior design strategies, which relate to regenerative design strategies, through a student project proactively implemented within the Interior Design department at the University of Derby, in an existing 3rd year module. A qualitative research design is used to analyse and code students’ proposals, using a constructivist, grounded theory approach. The results present ‘regenerative interior design strategies’. These varying strategies are used throughout the project, of which the most grounded tap into various social and environmental sustainability benefits. This can inform teaching about sustainability in interior design for a new ecological paradigm.
  • Evidence to the Parliamentary Inquiry on the Future of Journalism

    Conboy, Martin; Firmstone, Julie; Fox, Carl; Elliott-Harvey, Charlotte; Mulderrig, Jane; Saunders, Joe; Wragg, Paul; University of Derby (UK Parliament, 2020-04-30)
    Submission to the call for evidence to the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications and Digital: The future of Journalism.
  • Education as a catalyst for the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities

    Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldene; Strogilos, Vasilis; Dimitrellou, Eleni; University of Derby; University of Southampton (Wiley, 2021-11-15)
    Our editorial for this special issue on ‘Education as a catalyst for social inclusion’ is divided into two sections. The first section focuses on the gaps in applied research in learning disability that this issue attempts to address. The second section outlines how each of the articles in this issue broadens our understanding of how education may catalyse (or sometimes restrict) social inclusion. These articles combine to enrich the data and debate available to people with learning disabilities, their families and advocates, policy makers and professional leaders about how to strengthen education’s capacity to enrich social inclusion.
  • Strange Affiliation

    Clegg, Matthew; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
    In considering a poetry of silence, this chapter asks how might poets empathise, or identify with the disenfranchised? How might they employ the technique of personae, or mask voice, to explore that identification, or give voice to the silenced? In Joseph Conrad’s story, ‘The Secret Sharer’ (1910), a sea captain feels a powerful affinity with a fugitive, often referring to him as his ‘double’ or ‘second self’. To what extent can poets also be ‘secret sharers’? How might this practice go beyond the limitations of conventional identity politics? In giving voice to the silenced, how can a poet avoid exploiting or misrepresenting their subject? Through empathy and identification with disenfranchised groups or individuals, can poets cross boundaries of gender, race or socio-economic grouping? An exploration of this perspective on the role and function of poetry expands on key aspects of process, poetics and technique as active challenges to repressive silence, to furnish a means of articulating what might otherwise remain unvoiced. This reveals how practical engagement with a particular writerly dilemma – the imperative to speak as if on behalf of another – reveals something deeper about the nature of poetry.
  • DerbyVoice

    McMahon, Daithí; Jones, Rhiannon; University of Derby (2021-07-19)
    DerbyVoice is a research project led by University of Derby academics Dr Rhiannon Jones and Dr Daithí McMahon that engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education to create a public art installation. From July 16-19, 2021, the project exhibited for four days on the grounds of Derby Cathedral and attracted 80-110 visitors each day. The artistic and dialogic methodology used the Social Higher Education Depot (S.H.E.D) to create a co-designed site-specific installation in a prominent city centre location to offer a platform for artistic expression and act as an instigator for change to enable and empower young people in the city. The physical installation was designed by University of Derby students, in consultation with the research leads for the DerbyVoice project and responded to the theme of youth voice. As well as featuring the work of several community development partners from the city, the researchers commissioned seven young Derby artists to create bespoke work through their medium (music, illustration, fine art, photography, videography, graphic design and urban art) with the objective of offering a springboard for their burgeoning artistic careers. DerbyVoice provides young people with opportunities to share their contemplations and reflections on their city and their current concerns – Black Lives Matter (BLM), education reform, employment and personal and mental well-being - issues exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The research has identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school and the positive impact of financial and family support on young artists. The aim of this project is to enhance well-being, widen access to the arts and increase cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. The researchers also aim to instigate a shift in thinking about formal education and redefine the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for social, cultural and political change. The research highlights the benefits of artistic installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, the public and policy-makers to engage directly with urban youth, through creative place-making. The research actively contributes to the cultural offer in Derby and highlights the benefits of socially-engaged art with the aspiration that it could instigate similar projects in the future.
  • Our Story: Forging Connections Through Oral History

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-04-24)
    Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of members of the Irish diaspora (N=14) that emigrated to the Derby (UK) in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project offers examples of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. In addressing the theme this case study is an example of how oral histories and first-person testimonies can help forge connections between different generations of the Irish community and help form their Irish identities. It also aims to form connections between different communities in Derby to foster a more vibrant sense of community and improve awareness and understanding of the Irish immigrant and diaspora experience. The research demonstrates how original testimonies can help to facilitate comparisons between the Irish and other diasporas in the UK to develop better understandings of the make-up of the diverse Derby community. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute film will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the personal stories for the audience.
  • Our Story: The Experiences of Mid-Century Irish Emigrants to the UK

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-06-04)
    The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project.
  • Telling Our Story: Sharing the Experiences of Irish Emigrants Through Film

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-05-06)
    The purpose of Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby was to gather the personal testimonials of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England with a view to better understand their emigration and integration experiences as well as their contributions to the UK midlands region economically, socially and culturally. Particular focus was put on the members of the Irish community who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The 26-minute film of edited interviews offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour, the United Kingdom, to foster greater understand and acceptance of other nationalities. This is especially poignant during the period of uncertainty caused by Brexit. The recordings act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their Irish culture and heritage and use these to develop their own identities. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This paper will share some of the common themes that arose from the interview data which carry many elements of nostalgia as participants recount their migratory experiences. To offer context a 4-minute extract will be shown which offers a flavour of the project. It is hoped this project may help inspire further oral history projects involving not only Irish but other cultural communities in the UK. Link to Our Story film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTIOdA3nh5Q
  • Our Story: Preserving and Disseminating the Experiences of the Irish Diaspora in Derby

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-07-10)
    This paper proposes to discuss the project Our Story: A History of Irish in Derby (2020) as a case study for examination of the production process of editing over 8 hours of content from 14 contributors into an accessible 26-minute video for online public dissemination. Our Story is an oral history project that collects and shares the personal memories and experiences of the Irish diaspora who emigrated to Derby city in the 1950s and 60s. Emigration has long been a part of Irish history and identity, and this project acts as a recognition of the social, cultural and economic contributions the Irish have made to the Derby city and region. It also offers a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and the United Kingdom. This paper discusses the value of capturing the personal experiences of the ageing members of our population before their memories fade. The recordings therefore act as an archive and indelible record of their experiences so that future generations can understand and appreciate their experiences and contributions and use these to develop their own identities. The production and editing decisions were difficult but necessary as the producers worked towards creating an engaging work with a coherent narrative from multiple voices that would be viewed by a wide audience. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. To offer context a 4-minute audio visual piece will be shown which offers a sample of the project and the stories for the audience.
  • Holding Their Own: How Line of Duty offers the BBC a competitive edge in an increasingly crowded mediascape

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-10-01)
    The British Broadcasting Corporation’s (BBC) hit television series Line of Duty (2012-present) is the envy of every UK broadcaster and international streaming service alike, attracting enormous audiences and near universal critical acclaim. A number of factors have contributed to the success of BBC television dramas and have helped the organisation garner large audiences and thus remain relevant to a modern audience bombarded by numerous viewing platforms, countless titles and ever-present distractions and competition from social media and podcasting. Whereas commercial television networks are motivated to commodify audiences up to, and sometimes beyond saturation, PSBs can take a more artistically focused approach that serves to benefit the programme and audience first which leads to a better product. Another key factor is the social aspect afforded by synchronous TV viewing by the audience and the ‘second screening’ that goes with this live practice (Doughty, 2012; Proulx, 2012). This allows audiences to interact online before, during and after live broadcasts thus connect viewers and create online virtual communities (Rheingold, 2000). This communal experience can have a social bonding (Putnam, 2000) effect and help build a loyal following week after week – a lost tradition in an age of series dumps and binge watching. The author argues that in the modern highly competitive mediascape the BBC must take note of the factors that have contributed to their past and recent successes and work to replicate these in their future programming strategies. The BBC must also go one step further however, and attract the younger generations of viewers who represent the future Television License Fee payers. Through textual analysis of successful television programmes including Lost (2000-2006), The Office (2005-2006), Bodyguard (2018) and Line of Duty (2012-present), among others, this paper draws on examples of historical successes to chart a path for the future of BBC Television drama programming.
  • A Trusted Voice: The Threat to Irish Local Radio News Journalism

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (Future of Journalism Conference 2021 Cardiff University, 2021-09-22)
    For an anxious public living through the triple threat of biological, environmental, and economic crises, the need for rigorously gathered and trusted news and information has arguably never been more important. The proliferation of fake or unreliable news disseminated by social media, among other sources, puts into sharper focus the need for an independent, robust and publicly funded voice to cut through the nonsense and clutter. Radio remains the most trusted source of news and information in the Republic of Ireland (Reuters Institute 2018) and with 81% of all adults tuning in to radio daily (Ipsos MRBI 2021) news and current affairs output from the Irish Radio Industry is a particularly valuable public service. Much of this is as a result of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s licencing conditions, however, this overlooks the fact that local radio’s unique selling point, and that which draws audiences to them and away from the public service broadcaster RTÉ, is their knowledge and coverage of local news, current affairs, weather and sport. Furthermore, the commercial sector is much more adept and responsive to change in response to adversity and new challenges and can be the leader of transformation in the industry (McMahon 2019). As a result, local radio holds its own against the sizeable and well-resourced RTÉ and on average local stations enjoy around 50% market share (Ipsos MRBI 2021). However, the Irish Radio Industry has been experiencing a sustained period of economic hardship since the great recession in 2008 crippled the Irish economy. Add to this the competition for audience attention and advertising spend posed by the digital behemoths Facebook and Google and the picture is somewhat grim and pessimistic for this medium that is relied upon so much by the public for trustworthy news. RTÉ has not been immune to these pressures and it too is in a dire financial situation at present with cuts and asset sales ongoing to balance the books. Local radio news departments are the largest and most expensive cost centres for local radio stations due to the aforementioned quality of coverage offered and are therefore under threat. Less resources will inevitably lead to a reduction in the depth and breadth of news coverage. The primary threat to Irish radio’s news and journalism comes in the form of the agglomeration of radio stations by powerful multinationals into fewer entities. Under this form of structure stations typically cover larger areas but with a more homogeneous output and, crucially a centralised (McDonald & Starkey 2016) and generic news service which is cheap and limited in its scope. This rationalisation of radio has been the trend in the United Kingdom over the past decade (Hendy 2000; Waterson 2020) and the recent takeover of Communicorp, Ireland’s largest commercial radio group, by Bauer Media suggests a similar trend is on its way to Ireland. Using the Irish Radio Industry as its focus this paper draws from interviews with Irish industry professionals and considers what action the industry might take in the coming years and what government measures might help protect radio as a trusted and valued voice.
  • Our Story on Screen: Understanding Immigration Through the Experiences of Others

    McMahon, Daithí; University of Derby (2021-06-22)
    Our Story: A History of the Irish in Derby gathers the personal testimonies of the Irish diaspora in the city of Derby, England, who migrated in the 1950s-60s as one of the largest cohorts of modern Irish emigrants. The content has been collated into a 26-minute film that offers a compendium of stories, anecdotes and personal adventures which aims to offer the audience a better understanding of the experiences of emigrants in the hope they will develop a better appreciation of the migrant’s perspective on the often-thorny issue of immigration. By better understanding how emigration worked in the past the author argues that society can better understand how it works today. The personal perspectives of the contributors act as a reminder of the diverse and multicultural make-up of modern British society, while celebrating the strong links that exist between Ireland and its closest neighbour. This is especially poignant during the current uncertainty caused by Brexit which threatens to revive old divisions between cultures and communities. This practice-based research output aims to inform the public of how rich and diverse British society is and how by being open to learning about other cultures and the immense contribution they make socially, politically, economically and culturally, that perhaps a more equal and accepting society can be cultivated. This work demonstrates how important it is to be sensitive to social, cultural and historical context when examining the experiences and articulations of diaspora experiences. This creative practice-based research is an oral history project at its core and was crewed by undergraduate media production students thus offering applied pedagogic benefits and a publicly disseminated media output. This project was produced for inclusion in REF21 and the survey methodology and key findings and themes that have arisen will also be discussed. The author proposes a 10-minute presentation including a 3-minute promo video of interview samples for context.
  • Cazique

    Clegg, Matthew; University of Derby (Longbarrow Press, 2018)
    Cazique is a book in three movements. ‘Officer’ / ‘Zipped File’ details the breakdown in communication between employee and employer. ‘Holodets’ tackles what is lost in translation during a love affair between an English poet and a Russian immigrant. The title sequence offers the last confessions of a washed-up confidence trickster: a man inspired by the 19th century swindler Gregor MacGregor – the self-titled Cazique of Poyais. These dramatic sequences move between the public and the private, negotiating seductive facades and authentic flaws. Like the world we live in, the characters presented are in thrall to truth, but unable to live entirely by its strictures. Corporate homogeneity, romantic love, and Satanic deceit all fail to deliver the land of milk and honey. The poems of Cazique are inhabited by individuals in different environments and predicaments, coping with different pressures. They continue the author’s engagement with personae and place – and the ever-unstable relationship between the two.
  • The Navigators

    Clegg, Matthew; University of Derby (Longbarrow Press, 2015)
    explores the portals that connect time and place, and meditates on the element of water, as it moves through both. The book opens with rain falling in the Lake District, flowing to the South Yorkshire waterways, before arriving at the North Sea. The poems triangulate mental journeys between past, present and projected future. They draw on the dynamic physical geography of Cumbria and the East Yorkshire coast and on the life (and afterlife) of the canals of Leeds and Mexborough. The personal and historical ghosts that populate these landscapes are invoked or addressed. Versions of Apollonius, Aristophanes and Homer introduce an extra-temporal dimension, most apparent in the closing sequence of the collection, where these mythical, personal and historical threads are finally woven into one fugue-like movement. The Navigators is an affirmation of the reflection and regeneration that we find where waters meet and mingle; these literal and metaphorical thresholds offer both expedition and epiphany.
  • Marion Adnams and the Margins of Surrealism

    Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2021-06-10)
  • The Roaring Ghosts: Depictions of female silence and its oppositions

    McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
  • Introduction: On Silence in Language and Writing

    McCrory, Moy; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-26)
  • Silence and the Short Story Form

    McCrory, Moy; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-26)

View more