• Nutritional benefits of local meat produce

      Cseh, Leonard; Close, Hariett; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2012-05-09)
    • Psychological consumption of culinary artistry in the Peak District

      Cseh, Leonard; University of Derby, Buxton (Council for Hospitality Management Education, 2011-05-11)
      This paper is based upon the culture of culinary artistry, consumption and design. The ranges of sources are specific to The Peak District using Chatsworth House as a case study. It will attempt to conceptualise the heritage, sustainability and perception of culinary arts as a medium of culture. Elements of cultural heritage tourism will be incorporated into this paper and conceptualised to culinary arts. “Culture is a fascinating concept. Our favourite analogy is to compare it to a beautiful jewel – hold it to the light, and reveal its multiple dimensions. Culture is not just a tool for coping, but a means for creating awareness and for learning”. Harris and Moran (2001) Data collected through in-depth interviews, a questionnaire survey and observation will be presented and analysed which seeks to address the practical aspects to the theoretical models. The qualitative analysis of data suggests that there are parameters that have an important yet underlying resonance in the consumption of the product; cognition, perception and psychology. The fundamental feature of common sense psychology is the underlying belief system that underlies peoples overt behaviour are causes and that it is these causal patterns and NOT the way in which an activity is performed that represents the ‘real’ meaning of what people do. Initial research highlighted attribution theory as the underlying elements or associated discourses and is supported by Lewis (2006) who highlights Hofstedes definition of culture as the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one member from the other. A more simplified definition highlighted by Baron and Byrne (2000) defines culture as an organized system of shared meanings, perception and beliefs held by persons belonging to any group. This ‘cultural sensitivity’ is enhanced by utilising its resources to understand the perception and behaviours influenced by the cultural values (organized system or collective programming) of the host and guest (Wood and Botherton 2008).
    • Tourism, indigenous peoples and endogeneity in the Chatham Islands.

      Wiltshier, Peter; Cardow, Andrew; University of Derby; Massey University (Emerald, 2008)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. Design/methodology/approach – The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands. Findings – The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence. Originality/value – This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.
    • Worship & sightseeing: building a partnership approach to a ministry of welcome

      Wiltshier, Peter; Clarke, Alan; University of Derby; University of Pannonia (2013)
      This paper explores diverse opportunities for partnerships between the sacred and secular at religious sites. It identifies ways in which tourism suppliers can work collaboratively with sacred sites to enable sites to meet the demands of contemporary secular and sacred stakeholders. In the review of contemporary literature we consider supply and demand issues, site management, key components of partnership, ecumenical co-creation resources, cost-benefit and marketing needs. The paper is predicated on the provision of information and interpretation services for guidance, and development of all of these services. Methodologically, a participant observation approach was employed to confirm that tourism fits the strategic intent of religious leaders. We consider that partnership at a national, diocesan and parish level is an important part in effective tourism development. Elements of community involvement; capacity building and in- community development through engaging stakeholders are discussed. The balance achieved between stakeholders is important, and in our context the balance between local government and the tourism industry, and between active partners and the passive policy community, reflects the aims of the sacred and the private sector key partners, and the wider social capacity building aspects of community development agendas and government.