• Feminine men and masculine women: in/exclusion in the academy

      Atkins, Liz; Vicars, Mark; Northumbria University (Emerald, 31/03/2016)
      The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts of female masculinityto interrogate how hegemonic gendering discourses, forms and performances are inscribed in neoliberal narratives of competency in higher education in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on individual examples, the authors consider how these narratives are omnipresent in the sector, and systematically act to exclude those who do not conform. In doing so, the authors draw extensively on bodies of literature exploring gender/identity, and neo-liberalism. In particular, the paper draws on the work of Halberstam (1998, 2011), and of Drake (2015).There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. This paper examines neo-liberal practices from a more nuanced perspective than some traditional polarised critiques which regard gender as a binary. In doing so, it contributes to debates on masculinity, but more importantly, opens discussions about the implications of gendering discourses for the role of the few women in senior positions in higher education institutions globally.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Creating feminized critical spaces and co-caring communities of practice outside patriarchal managerial landscapes

      Duckworth, Vicky; Lord, Janet; Dunne, Linda; Atkins, Liz; Watmore, Sue; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 29/01/2016)
      The experiences of five female lecturers working in higher education in the UK are explored as they engage in the search for a feminized critical space as a refuge from the masculinized culture of performativity in which they feel constrained and devalued. Email exchanges were used as a form of narrative enquiry that provided opportunity and space to negotiate identities and make meaning from experiences. The exchanges provided a critical space, characterised by trust, honesty and care for the self and for each other, that enabled a sharing of authentic voices and a reaffirming of identities that were made vulnerable through the exposing of the self as an emotional, politicised subject. Drawing on existing theoretical understandings of critical feminised spaces enabled us to create a pedagogical framework for work with students in further developing caring and co-caring communities of practice that are not alternative to, but are outside the performativity landscape of education.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Dis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Wiley, 23/03/2016)
      This article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
    • Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education

      Atkins, Liz; Duckworth, Vicky; Northumbria University (Bloomsbury, 21/02/2019)
      Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education offers researchers a full understanding of very important concepts, showing how they can be used a means to develop practical strategies for undertaking research that makes a difference to the lives of marginalised and disadvantaged learners. It explores different conceptualisations of social justice and equity, and leads the reader through a discussion of what their implications are for undertaking educational research that is both moral and ethical and how it can be enacted in the context of their chosen research method and a variety of others, both well-known and more innovative.
    • Theorising career guidance policymaking: watching the sausage get made

      Hooley, Tristram; Godden, Lorraine; University of Derby; Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada (Informa UK Limited, 2021-07-14)
      In this article, we propose a framework for understanding career guidance policy. We use a systems theory approach informed by Gramscian theories of politics and power to make sense of this complexity. Firstly, we argue that career guidance policy is made by and for people and that there is a need to recognise all of the political and civil society actors involved. Secondly, we argue that policymaking comprises a series of ideological, technical and practical processes. Finally, we contend that policymaking takes place in a complex, multi-level environment which is can be described across three levels as the policy framing, middle and street level tiers.
    • Personal Guidance Fund Evaluation: Final Report

      Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2021-07-07)
      Since the transfer of responsibility for career guidance to schools /colleges, a range of approaches to delivering personal guidance have been utilised in schools and colleges in order for them to meet the statutory requirement of implementation of the Gatsby benchmarks. In their report for The Careers & Enterprise Company, Everitt, Neary, Delgardo and Clark (2018) concluded that five key points need to be in place for effective personal guidance (space & time; preparation & feedback, effective interviewing; professionalism and integration) but that ‘the evidence on personal guidance remains a work in progress’. The Careers & Enterprise Company recognised the importance of this of this work, developing the Personal Guidance Fund which aimed to support the development of innovative, cost-effective models for delivering personal careers guidance in schools and colleges. Evaluation aims and objectives The evaluation focused on identifying effective approaches with the intention of improving practice beyond the fund. The report considers: 1. The effectiveness of different approaches. 2. Working with different beneficiary groups. 3. The impact of personal guidance on students. 4. The impact of training on staff and school/college career guidance. 5. Key learning regarding scaling up, sustainability and best practice This report describes the methodology adopted to answer these objectives and outlines key learning with regard to the different approaches adopted and the different beneficiaries targeted. It considers the impact of the programmes on students and the staff who took part in training and provides recommendations for programme providers, Careers Leaders and Senior Leadership Teams in schools and colleges.
    • Career education in primary school

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Education Service Australia, 2021-07)
      This paper sets out key principles and research for career education in primary schools
    • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
      Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
    • Personal agency and organisational attachment: A career capital perspective

      Brown, Cathy; Hooley, Tristram; Wond, Tracey; Evolve Consulting Services Limited, Nottingham; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-14)
      Despite role transitions occurring frequently within organisations, career theories have often overlooked such transitions. Here we explore the role of personal agency and organisational attachment in shaping career capital enactment within intra-organisational role transitions. We propose a new career capital usage typology. Using an interpretivist approach, the research is based within a UK construction business and explores the role transition experiences of 36 business leaders. Through an analysis of workers’ career capital use we identify a new typology and groups workers as follows: Passive Worker, Company Worker, Political Worker and Career Worker. We argue that type varies in accordance with levels of personal agency and organisational attachment and that this variation in type is particularly important during intra-organisational role transitions.
    • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

      Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
      To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.
    • Approaches to quality assurance in school-based career development: policymaker perspectives from Australia

      Rice, Suzanne; Hooley, Tristram; Crebbin, Sue; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-05-19)
      In this article we explore Australian policymaker perspectives on the quality assurance of career development (CD) programmes in schools. We found that Australian policymakers are concerned about the quality of CD provision in schools and have a wide range of approaches that they deploy to ensure and assure quality at the school level. Quality assurance within the country is focused on the qualifications and professionalism of the people delivering career development programmes rather than on systemic or organisational quality. We also found that the range of quality assurance tools that are deployed by such policymakers varies across the different Australian jurisdictions and is influenced by geography, the size of the jurisdiction and the level of priority given to career guidance.
    • Ethics, Impartiality, Locus of Control

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (EKS, 2021-05-01)
      Those working in ‘helping’ professions will occasionally be presented with issues that feel uncomfortable, challenge their own values and beliefs, and result in ethical dilemmas associated with choosing appropriate attitudes, behaviours and approaches. In the career development context, ethics refers to the moral principles that govern the way practitioners practice. This article provides a dialogue between two practitioners, who, discuss an ethical dilemma and try to decide on an appropriate course of action.
    • A Practitioner's Guide to Uncharted Waters of Career Counselling, a Critical Reflection Perspective

      Košťálová, Helena; Cudlínová, Markéta; Blake, Hannah; Clark, Lewis; Dimsits, Miriam; Kavková, Eva; Graungaard, Elisabeth; Moore, Nicki; Sigaard Hansen, Jesper; Neary, Siobhan; et al. (EKS, 2021-05-01)
      This is a practical book intended for career practitioners working with young people in schools and other institutions providing career guidance and counselling. The aim is to offer practitioners support so that they can feel empowered in their roles as career counsellors, and are able to take care of themselves and gain new ideas for their practice. The book is one output of an Erasmus funded project which invovled partners from the UK, Denmark, Greece, Spain and the Czech Republic.
    • The Language of SEND: Implications for the SENCO

      Codina, Geraldene; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester (Routledge, 2021-04-22)
      The central tenet of this chapter is that language matters. Over the centuries as human beings have represented and categorised both themselves and others in different ways, so interpretations and the language of disability (physical and learning) shape-shifts altering through time (Goodey, 2016). The language of disability and the societal and political values which underpin it are therefore not cross-historical – let two or three generations pass and the labels associated with disability alter. Sometimes such changes in language usage can seem little more than semantic fashion or a professional challenge to keep up-to-date with. The language of disability is however more than fashion and political correctness (Mallett and Slater, 2014), for words gain their meaning from the manner in which they are used (Wittgenstein, 2009). This chapter argues the language of special education shapes SENCOs’ values, expectations, assumptions, responses and practice. Through an exploration of historical and current language usage, this chapter analyses the language of special education and the implications for the school community.
    • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Final report

      Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This report sets out the findings of an Erasmus funded pan-Euopean research project which investigated the impacts on young peoples career decisions. The research was undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Crucial impacts on career choices: Research to understand the influences on young people’s choices in primary and secondary schools: Executive summary

      Moore, Nicki; Clark, Lewis; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-04-01)
      This is the executive summary which sets out the findings of European research undertaken by five project partners (The Czech Republic, The United Kingdom, Denmark, Greece and Spain) and lead by a team from the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby in the UK. The research was conducted between September 2018 and July 2020. This project has illuminated the similarities and differences in the way young people approach career decision making and the influences which prevail. Whilst there are some differences between the partner countries, largely due to the economic or social conditions which prevail, there are many similarities. The findings from this research will help those tasked with developing programmes of career development and support to identify and focus on specific aspects of their programmes suggested by the research.
    • Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

      Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
      This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.