• Career education in primary school

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Education Service Australia, 2021-07)
      This paper sets out key principles and research for career education in primary schools
    • Covid-19: The impact of the crisis on student recruitment and development

      Institute of Student Employers; AGCAS; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-06)
      This report presents the findings of a survey conducted by the Institute of Student Employers and AGCAS in 2020 to explore the impacts of the pandemic on student employers.
    • Covid-19: Global impacts on graduate recruitment

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-07)
      This report sets out the findings of an Institute of Student Employers investigation into the impacts of Covid-19 on the global graduate labour market.
    • What do students want? Listening to the voices of young jobseekers

      Institute of Student Employers; Debut; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers & Debut, 2020-09)
      This research poses a series of seven big questions asked by employers and allows over 2000 students and jobseekers to answer these questions. It is based on surveys conducted in June and July 2020 in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. It looks at students and jobseekers experience of the jobs market and recruitment process.
    • ISE Annual Student Recruitment Survey 2018

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2018)
      This paper sets out the findings of the Institute of Student Employers 2018 recruitment survey.
    • The ISE Pulse Survey 2020: Taking the temperature of the graduate labour market.

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-02)
      This report sets out the findings of the ISE Pulse Survey 2020
    • Student development survey 2020: Supporting the learning and development of entry-level hires.

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-03)
      This report sets out the findings of the 2020 Institute of Student Employers development survey.
    • COVID-19: Challenges for student recruitment and development

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-04)
      Findings of the survey looking at employers practice in the recruitment and development of early career hires following the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.
    • Responding to COVID-19: The experience of suppliers

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-05)
      Findings of the Institute of Student Employers survey of suppliers to the student employment market during the Covid-19 pandemic.
    • Pulse survey 2019

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-02)
      Finding of the Institute of Student Employers Pulse Survey 2019
    • Student development survey 2019

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-03)
      Findings from the Institute of Student Employers, student development survey 2019.
    • Stability, transparency, flexibility and employer ownership. Employer recommendations for improving the apprenticeship system

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-06)
      Report from the ISE setting out current employer practice in the apprenticeship system and exploring options for the future.
    • Inside student recruitment 2019: Findings of the ISE recruitment survey

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-09)
      Findings of the 2019 Institute of Student Employers recruitment survey.
    • Theorising career guidance policymaking: watching the sausage get made

      Hooley, Tristram; Godden, Lorraine; University of Derby; Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada (Informa UK Limited, 2021-07-14)
      In this article, we propose a framework for understanding career guidance policy. We use a systems theory approach informed by Gramscian theories of politics and power to make sense of this complexity. Firstly, we argue that career guidance policy is made by and for people and that there is a need to recognise all of the political and civil society actors involved. Secondly, we argue that policymaking comprises a series of ideological, technical and practical processes. Finally, we contend that policymaking takes place in a complex, multi-level environment which is can be described across three levels as the policy framing, middle and street level tiers.
    • Ethics, Impartiality, Locus of Control

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (EKS, 2021-05-01)
      Those working in ‘helping’ professions will occasionally be presented with issues that feel uncomfortable, challenge their own values and beliefs, and result in ethical dilemmas associated with choosing appropriate attitudes, behaviours and approaches. In the career development context, ethics refers to the moral principles that govern the way practitioners practice. This article provides a dialogue between two practitioners, who, discuss an ethical dilemma and try to decide on an appropriate course of action.
    • Personal Guidance Fund Evaluation: Final Report

      Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2021-07-07)
      Since the transfer of responsibility for career guidance to schools /colleges, a range of approaches to delivering personal guidance have been utilised in schools and colleges in order for them to meet the statutory requirement of implementation of the Gatsby benchmarks. In their report for The Careers & Enterprise Company, Everitt, Neary, Delgardo and Clark (2018) concluded that five key points need to be in place for effective personal guidance (space & time; preparation & feedback, effective interviewing; professionalism and integration) but that ‘the evidence on personal guidance remains a work in progress’. The Careers & Enterprise Company recognised the importance of this of this work, developing the Personal Guidance Fund which aimed to support the development of innovative, cost-effective models for delivering personal careers guidance in schools and colleges. Evaluation aims and objectives The evaluation focused on identifying effective approaches with the intention of improving practice beyond the fund. The report considers: 1. The effectiveness of different approaches. 2. Working with different beneficiary groups. 3. The impact of personal guidance on students. 4. The impact of training on staff and school/college career guidance. 5. Key learning regarding scaling up, sustainability and best practice This report describes the methodology adopted to answer these objectives and outlines key learning with regard to the different approaches adopted and the different beneficiaries targeted. It considers the impact of the programmes on students and the staff who took part in training and provides recommendations for programme providers, Careers Leaders and Senior Leadership Teams in schools and colleges.
    • A Practitioner's Guide to Uncharted Waters of Career Counselling, a Critical Reflection Perspective

      Košťálová, Helena; Cudlínová, Markéta; Blake, Hannah; Clark, Lewis; Dimsits, Miriam; Kavková, Eva; Graungaard, Elisabeth; Moore, Nicki; Sigaard Hansen, Jesper; Neary, Siobhan; et al. (EKS, 2021-05-01)
      This is a practical book intended for career practitioners working with young people in schools and other institutions providing career guidance and counselling. The aim is to offer practitioners support so that they can feel empowered in their roles as career counsellors, and are able to take care of themselves and gain new ideas for their practice. The book is one output of an Erasmus funded project which invovled partners from the UK, Denmark, Greece, Spain and the Czech Republic.
    • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
      Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
    • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

      Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
      To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.
    • Personal agency and organisational attachment: A career capital perspective

      Brown, Cathy; Hooley, Tristram; Wond, Tracey; Evolve Consulting Services Limited, Nottingham; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-14)
      Despite role transitions occurring frequently within organisations, career theories have often overlooked such transitions. Here we explore the role of personal agency and organisational attachment in shaping career capital enactment within intra-organisational role transitions. We propose a new career capital usage typology. Using an interpretivist approach, the research is based within a UK construction business and explores the role transition experiences of 36 business leaders. Through an analysis of workers’ career capital use we identify a new typology and groups workers as follows: Passive Worker, Company Worker, Political Worker and Career Worker. We argue that type varies in accordance with levels of personal agency and organisational attachment and that this variation in type is particularly important during intra-organisational role transitions.