Now showing items 1-20 of 5879

    • Exploration and Prioritization of Just in Time Enablers for Sustainable Healthcare: An Integrated GRA-Fuzzy TOPSIS Application

      Singh Kaswan, Mahender; Rathi, Rajeev; Singh, Mahipal; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Antony, Jiju; Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India; University of Derby; Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (Emerald, 2021-06-21)
      The increased healthcare costs, improved service quality, and sustainability-oriented customer demand have forced the healthcare sector to relook their current process. The present work deals with the identification, analysis, and prioritization of Just in Time (JIT) enablers in the healthcare sector. JIT leads to waste reduction, improves productivity, and provides high quality patient care. The practical implementation of JIT depends on vital factors known as enablers. The enablers have been found through the comprehensive literature review and prioritized using responses from different healthcare facilities of national capital region of India. Grey Relational Analysis (GRA) has been used in the present study to rank enablers and ranks were further validated using fuzzy TOPSIS and sensitivity analysis. It has been found that top management support, teamwork, and real-time information sharing are the most significant enablers of JIT in healthcare with grey relational grades 0.956, 0.832, and 0.718, respectively. The corresponding closeness coefficients of the fuzzy TOPSIS for the enablers were found as 0.875, 0.802, and 0.688, respectively. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to implement a comprehensive JIT approach that further leads to improved patient care at low cost. The present study is unique in terms of the exploration of the readiness measures or enablers of JIT using GRA and fuzzy TOPSIS. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to optimize their resources for better patient care.
    • Definitions of biodiversity from urban gardeners

      Norton, Briony, A.; Shang, Bowen; Sheffield, David; Ramsey, Andrew; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-06-14)
      Living in urban environments can leave people disconnected from nature and less likely to engage with biodiversity conservation. Within urban areas, residential gardens can occupy large proportions of greenspace and provide important habitat for biodiversity. Understanding the views and knowledge of garden owners who have collective responsibility for managing these areas is therefore important. We aimed to understand how urban garden owners understand biodiversity. We surveyed garden owners in Derby, UK, across 20 areas spanning a socioeconomic spectrum. Residents were asked to explain their understanding of ‘biodiversity’ in a short definition format. Responses were classified using thematic and word frequency analyses. Of 255 respondents, approximately one third were unable to provide a definition. From the definitions provided, themes that emerged in frequency order were: variety of species or environments; coexistence of organisms; conservation of nature; a synonym for habitat; and uncommon answers not clearly related to biodiversity. Members of wildlife or gardening charities were more likely than non-members to say they could define biodiversity and to use specific taxonomic terms. We detected no difference between keen and less keen gardeners. These short-form responses captured many themes longer and/or qualitative assessments have identified about people’s understanding of biodiversity and illustrate a diversity and, in some cases, a depth of understanding of the concepts of biodiversity, without necessarily adhering to the formal definition. Given the variety of understanding, at this critical period, technical terms, even common ones, should be used with caution and with an open mind about how people interpret them.
    • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
      Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
    • Crisis Management and Recovery for Events: Impacts and Strategies

      Ziakas, Vassilios; Antchak, Vladimir; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; University of Queensland (Goodfellow Publishers, 2021-04-01)
      Reveals how to effectively manage events in times of crisis, and leveraging events for post-disaster recovery. The volume brings together theoretical and practical insights in order to set up a robust ground for effective crisis management and recovery strategies of events.
    • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

      Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
      To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.
    • Understanding the core elements of event portfolio strategy: lessons from Auckland and Dunedin

      Antchak, Vladimir; Michael, Luck; Tomas, Pernecky; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand (Emerald, 2021-05-17)
      An event portfolio is a vital part of economic and socio-cultural processes designed around the use of public events in cities and destinations around the world. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a new research framework for comparative studies of diverse event portfolio strategies. The discussion in this paper is based on a review of the literature and content analysis of event strategies from two New Zealand cities: Auckland and Dunedin. The paper suggests an empirically tested framework for exploring event portfolios. It entails such dimensions as the event portfolio strategy, event portfolio focus, portfolio objectives and evaluation tools and event portfolio configuration. This exploratory research provides a comparative analysis of diverse portfolio contexts and offers insights on developing sustainable event strategies while considering diverse local contexts. Core conditions and processes shaping event portfolio design and management are evaluated and strategic factors articulated.
    • A Qualitative Study Comparing Mindfulness and Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing): Practitioners’ Perspectives

      Clarke, Fiona J.; Kotera, Yasuhiro; McEwan, Kirsten; University of Birmingham; University of Derby (MDPI AG, 2021-06-15)
      The boundary between mindfulness and forest bathing, two conceptually related therapies, is unclear. Accordingly, this study reports the strengths and challenges, similarities and differences, and barriers and facilitators for both. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven trained and experienced practitioners of both mindfulness and forest bathing. Reflexive thematic analysis revealed four main themes: (i) differences between the approaches; (ii) the benefits of forest bathing; (iii) biophilia through forest bathing; and (iv) inward versus outward attentional focus as a distinction between the approaches. Both practices were found to benefit well-being, but practitioners revealed key barriers to mindfulness. For vulnerable groups experiencing mental health challenges or difficulties achieving a meditative state, mindfulness may introduce well-being risks. By offering a gentler, more intuitive approach that encourages outward attentional focus, forest bathing was found to overcome this barrier. Forest bathing is suitable for all groups, but adaptations are recommended for those expressing fear or discomfort in forested environments. The findings inform how to position both approaches in practice, as a first step towards social prescribing recommendations. Wider implications concern forest bathing’s potential to impact environmental well-being. Future research must garner comparative data, involve young people, and explore the feasibility of a forest bathing social prescription.
    • Derbyshire Virtual School: Creative Mentoring Programme Final Report

      Nunn, Alexander; Turner, Royce; Adhikari, Joanna; Brooks, Catherine; University of Derby (Derby Virtual School, 2021-06)
    • Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic

      Jones, Rhiannon; University of Rome; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-06-11)
      Dr Jones chair of the Contemporary Art Working Group will discuss examples of how artists, educators and researchers are creating Design Culture(s) within Contemporary Art practice and research. It will consider this in relation to the Cumulus Community, so extending the debate on current issues, practices and research shared live at the Cumulus 2021 conference. To facilitate this, there will be a project presentation on Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic. Dr Jones invited Andrea Hadley-Johnson, Artistic Programme Manager, National Justice Museum, UK to co-present and share examples of methodologies engaged and devised through a co-creative and place-making model for the generation of public practice. This will be followed by an open platform for discussion. We will share ideas or acts of resilience, adaption and invention within Contemporary Art locating examples within a globalised frame of reference. The working group invited participation from academics, located internationally, whose practice and/or research challenges notions of civic resilience, design cultures, current cultural, social, and economic challenges in art and design.
    • Derby Voice: Creative Place-Making

      Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Western Australia (Common Ground Research Networks, 2021-06-16)
      The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. The research’s impact is noted within UK contemporary social contexts. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It provided essential life skills resulting in social mobility and widening access to the arts. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
    • Personal agency and organisational attachment: A career capital perspective

      Brown, Cathy; Hooley, Tristram; Wond, Tracey; Evolve Consulting Services Limited, Nottingham; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-14)
      Despite role transitions occurring frequently within organisations, career theories have often overlooked such transitions. Here we explore the role of personal agency and organisational attachment in shaping career capital enactment within intra-organisational role transitions. We propose a new career capital usage typology. Using an interpretivist approach, the research is based within a UK construction business and explores the role transition experiences of 36 business leaders. Through an analysis of workers’ career capital use we identify a new typology and groups workers as follows: Passive Worker, Company Worker, Political Worker and Career Worker. We argue that type varies in accordance with levels of personal agency and organisational attachment and that this variation in type is particularly important during intra-organisational role transitions.
    • An Identity Process Theory Account of the Impact of Boarding School on Sense of Self and Mental Health: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

      Simpson, Frances; Haughton, Melanie; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-03-08)
      Boarding schools exist to provide education for children, but this involves the child leaving the family home and residing in an educational institution. Identity Process Theory suggests that such a change in circumstances can threaten the child’s identity, which triggers coping strategies and impacts on the individual’s self-concept during both childhood and adulthood. This study undertook an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted with five adults who boarded as children. The focus was on exploring participants’ beliefs in terms of how the boarding experience affected their sense of self. Emerging themes relate to the (i) coping strategies used by participants during childhood, such as amnesia, compartmentalising, compliance and acceptance, and (ii) long-term effects of boarding on identity, self-concept and intimate relationships. Findings also highlight the interplay of factors such as privilege and social class, which were reported as motives for participants’ parents choosing boarding for their children. The study raises important questions about the long-term health impacts of sending children away to board.
    • A Multimodal Discourse Analysis of ‘Brexit’: Flagging the Nation in Political Cartoons

      Lennon, Henry; Kilby, Laura; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Palgrave, 2021-02-04)
      The rhetorical investigation of multimodality in political discourse is a growing concern for discursive researchers adopting critical approaches. The study of political cartoons is a prime example of how both visual and linguistic meaning can be constructed and interpreted based on its prevailing social, cultural and political settings. Adopting a multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA) approach, this chapter further pursues the study of multimodality in political communication by examining a corpus of political cartoons—drawn from the UK and beyond—concerned with the UK’s Referendum on membership of the European Union and the subsequent vote to leave in 2016. We analyse how the rhetoric of these cartoons flags the construction of national identity, otherness and belonging, lending themselves to condensed ideological messages seeking to frame Brexit. It is argued such cartoons can be seen as micro-instances of the anchoring of Brexit as a self-referential political divide defined by oppositional discourses and their accompanying intellectual legacy. A phenomenon, which, we contend, is richly explained by the rhetorical communication of the visual alongside the linguistic. We conclude the chapter by reflecting on how MCDA can assist our understanding of political communication and contribute to the critical tradition of discursive psychological work.
    • Approaches to quality assurance in school-based career development: policymaker perspectives from Australia

      Rice, Suzanne; Hooley, Tristram; Crebbin, Sue; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-05-19)
      In this article we explore Australian policymaker perspectives on the quality assurance of career development (CD) programmes in schools. We found that Australian policymakers are concerned about the quality of CD provision in schools and have a wide range of approaches that they deploy to ensure and assure quality at the school level. Quality assurance within the country is focused on the qualifications and professionalism of the people delivering career development programmes rather than on systemic or organisational quality. We also found that the range of quality assurance tools that are deployed by such policymakers varies across the different Australian jurisdictions and is influenced by geography, the size of the jurisdiction and the level of priority given to career guidance.
    • Are spousal partner perceptions of continuity and discontinuity within the relationship linked to the symptoms of acquired brain injury?

      Yasmin, Natasha; Riley, Gerard; University of Birmingham; University of Derby (Tylor & Francis, 2021-03-18)
      Some partners experience their relationship with a person with brain injury as the continuation of a loving pre-injury relationship (continuity), but others feel that the pre-injury relationship has been lost and replaced with something very different (discontinuity). This study provided a quantitative test of claims arising from qualitative research that certain symptoms of the injury might contribute to the experience of discontinuity – specifically, lack of emotional warmth, reduced social interaction and aggression. Fifty-three partners providing care to someone with brain injury completed questionnaires assessing continuity/discontinuity and a range of symptoms (emotional warmth, conversational ability, aggression, depression, somatic complaints, cognition, communication, aggression, and phys- ical disability). Discontinuity was significantly correlated with all symptom variables except physical disability but, in a multiple regression, only the measures of emotional warmth, conversation, aggression, and depression made a significant unique contribution. Discontinuity has been linked with relationship dissatisfaction and dysfunction, greater bur- den and distress, and a less person-centred approach to the provision of care. Identifying which symp- toms contribute to discontinuity may enable partners to be more effectively supported in terms of how they make sense of and react to those symptoms, so that a greater sense of continuity may be retained.
    • Older people, dementia and neuro-dramatic-play: A personal and theoretical drama therapy perspective

      Holmwood, Clive; University of Derby (Intellect, 2021-05-10)
      This conceptual article will consider Sue Jennings’ neuro-dramatic-play (NDP) as an overall theoretical framework for working with older people with dementia. NDP was developed over a number of years by pioneering UK drama therapist Sue Jennings. It is a culmination of attachment-based play, drama, movement and storytelling, and arts-based approaches that are used within drama therapy and other play and creative-based work with children. The author will consider from a personal and reflective perspective how NDP approaches can be adapted by drama therapists to work with older people with memory loss based on almost 30-years history of being involved in the field of drama therapy as a student and practioner, and his work with older people, at both the beginning of his career and his current reflections many years later.
    • Effects of a regional school-based mindfulness programme on students’ levels of Wellbeing and resiliency

      Nelson, Lisa; Roots, Katie; Dunn, Thomas J.; Rees, Alice; Hull, Dawn Davies; Van Gordon, William; Derbyshire Educational Psychology Service, Matlock; Bishop Grosseteste University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-04-12)
      Mindfulness has recently shown promise in mental illness treatment and preventative contexts with school-aged young people. However, there is a shortage of studies investigating the effects of school-based mindfulness interventions on young people of a pre-adolescent and early-adolescent age. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a regional multi-site school-based mindfulness programme on wellbeing and resiliency in UK school children aged 9–12 years old. A total of 1,138 children who received mindfulness training completed the Resiliency Scale for Children and Adolescents and the Stirling Children’s Wellbeing Scale pre- and post-intervention. Results showed significant improvements following intervention delivery in positive emotional state, positive outlook, and resiliency, with resiliency effects maintained at a six-month follow-up assessment. Findings indicate that mindfulness delivered by school teachers can improve wellbeing and resiliency in children and young people.
    • Transforming product labels using digital technologies to enable enhanced traceability and management of hazardous chemicals

      Takhar, Sukhraj; Liyanage, Kapila; University of Derby (Inderscience, 2021-06-08)
      Manufacturers that produce, distribute or market physical products are likely to be impacted by numerous chemical and product regulations. Manufacturers must identify chemical substances which appear within mixtures, materials, formulations, raw materials, components, assemblies and finished products. This results in a very manual and resource intensive process of collection of chemical substances in products data, where definitions arise from internal, industry standards, supplier and customer requirements and often sourced from multiple supply chain actors. This paper contributes to existing literature by identifying a research gap in transforming current manual state data collection tasks via the utilisation of digital technologies, leveraging real-time data collection using smart labels to identify chemicals contained within products. The proposed design enables manufacturers to identify the use of chemicals consumed in a automated manner and enabling appropriate risks to be identified and managed accordingly. The design can be further expanded in the proposed collaborative data sharing network.
    • Death, landscape and memorialisation in Victorian urban society: Nottingham's General Cemetery (1837) and Church Cemetery (1856)

      Elliott, Paul; University of Derby (The Thoroton Society, 2021-05-13)
      This article argues that through their buildings, landscaping, planting, monuments and management, Nottingham’s Victorian garden cemeteries functioned as heterotopias and heterochronias enabling visitors to traverse the globe, serving as portals to remote places and linking past with present and future and the living and dead. By the 1820s, the town faced problems associated with a high population density, crowded churchyards and poor public health, exacerbated by space restrictions caused by burgess rights to surrounding common lands. From the 1830s campaigners called for a comprehensive enclosure act with associated public green spaces intended to compensate the burgesses for loss of rights of common. As the first specially-designed public green space established under the reformed corporation, the General Cemetery (1837) played a crucial role in winning support for the Nottingham Enclosure Act (1845). This enabled the creation of the Nottingham Arboretum (1852) and other interconnected public parks and walks, providing additional space for the General Cemetery and land for a new Anglican Church Cemetery (1856). Landscaped and planted like a country-house garden with some (but not universal) interdenominational support, the General Cemetery provided a model for the public parks laid out after the 1845 act. It was also seen as an arboretum because of its extensive tree collection, which pre-dated the arboretums in Derby (1840) and Nottingham (1852). The Church Cemetery too, with its commanding location, landscaping, planting, antiquities and rich historical associations, likewise effectively served as another public park. Although quickly joined by other urban and suburban cemeteries in the Nottingham vicinity, the two Victorian garden cemeteries served the needs of a modern industrial population whilst invoking memories of communities long gone. Like the botanical gardens, arboretums, art galleries, museums and libraries, the two cemeteries were intended to further the objectives of middle-class rational recreationists as well as to serve moral and religious purposes and foster urban identity, even if, like them, they remained institutions divided by class and religion.
    • Realignment of Product Stewardship towards Chemical Regulations, the Circular Economy and Corporate Social Responsibility – a Delphi Study

      Liyanage, Kapila; Takhar, Sukhraj; University of Derby (Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology (ITS), 2021-07)
      Chemical regulations exist to limit and control the amount of hazardous chemical substances being used by industry. Increasing awareness of diminishing natural resources, increasing pollution, and reducing the amounts of harmful waste, has led towards increasing societal and regulatory pressure on industry to change from the traditional closed-loop manufacturing towards the adoption of sustainable materials and open-loop manufacturing systems as part of the Circular Economy. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) extends the relationship between industry and society. Product Stewardship (PS) provides a platform for organizations to assess impacts to manufacturing systems ensuring adequate measures are in place to understand, control or limit any impact(s) from manufacturing and using products. The research question answered in this paper relates to understanding the impacts on PS. This paper has been written based on a literature review and Delphi study. The outcomes from this paper will attempt to outline a framework for PS to align with Chemical Regulations, the Circular Economy and CSR.