• Japanese Martial Arts for Wellbeing During COVID-19

      Veasey, Christian; Foster Phillips, Charlotte-Fern; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis Group plc, 2021-09-16)
      The unprecedented and uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic have changed our lifestyles significantly, with lockdowns and social distancing measures in place to reduce virus transmission. These changes have likely had a negative effect on our wellbeing, and have been associated with increased stress, anxiety, and depression. During these unforeseen times, online martial arts lessons have highlighted the possibilities that martial arts offer in regard to positive wellbeing benefits such as self-awareness and self-mastery in managing and dealing with health issues. This short paper examines the potential benefits martial arts training may provide as an alternative wellbeing strategy to counter challenges associated with COVID-19.
    • What Comes First, the Behavior or the Condition? In the COVID-19 Era, It May Go Both Ways

      Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Faghy, Mark A; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-08-12)
      Which came first, the chicken or the egg? This causality dilemma was first proposed by the Greek biographer Plutarch in the 1st century CE. While the cause-effect relationship between lifestyle behaviors and chronic disease is not always a certainty, and genetic predisposition can independently lead to premature chronic disease, the likelihood of developing one or more chronic conditions is significantly higher in those who: (1) lead sedentary lifestyles; (2) consume unhealthy diets; (3) smoke; or (4) have excess body mass. Recently, the Royal College of General Practitioners issued an apology for the title of an online event that suggested the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a lifestyle disease. We feel that this was the correct course of action as leading an unhealthy lifestyle is certainly not the cause for an individual contracting COVID-19 (ie, effect). However, a body of evidence has demonstrated that unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and characteristics as well as being diagnosed with one or more chronic diseases does significantly increase the risk for a complicated medical course in individuals infected with COVID-19. Moreover, the cause-effect relationship between lifestyle behaviors and characteristics and COVID-19 may eventually prove to go both ways, as the pandemic may lead to a higher prevalence of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and characteristics over the long term that eventually leads to a higher prevalence of chronic disease. As such, health living medicine must be widely practiced and prescribed to all individuals globally.
    • Oro-mucosal midazolam maleate: Use and effectiveness in adults with epilepsy in the UK

      Shankar, Rohit; Goodwin, Melesina; Toland, John; Boyle, Andrew; Grant, Amanda; Pearson, Josephine; Storer, Amanda; Higgins, Richard; Hudson, Sharon; Reuber, Markus; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-08-07)
      Oro-mucosal midazolam maleate (OMM) with suitable training to family and carers is being increasingly recognized as the treatment of choice to mitigate the development of status epilepticus in non-hospital community settings. There are no studies to describe the use, effectiveness, and suitable dosing of OMM in adults with epilepsy in community settings. To describe the use, effectiveness, and dosing of OMM in the emergency treatment of epileptic seizures in community settings. A retrospective observational study (2016–17) design was used with participant recruitment from four UK NHS secondary care outpatient clinics providing epilepsy management. Study sample was of adult people with epilepsy (PWE) having had a recent seizure requiring OMM. Data on patient demographics, patient care plans, details of a recent seizure requiring emergency medication, and dose of OMM were collected from medical records. Study data from 146 PWE were included. The mean age of PWE was 41.0 years (SD 15.2) and mean weight was 64.8Kg (SD 18.2). Fifty-three percent of PWE were recorded as having intellectual disability. The most frequently used concomitant medications were lamotrigine (43%). The majority of seizures occurred at people’s homes (n = 92, 63%). OMM was most often administered by family/professional care-givers (n = 75, 48.4%). Generalized (tonic/clonic) seizures were recorded in most people (n = 106, 72.6%). The most common initial dose of OMM was 10 mg (n = 124, 84.9%). The mean time to seizure cessation after administration of this initial dose was 5.5 minutes (SD = 4.5, Median 5.0, IQR 2.1–5.0). Only a minority of seizures led to ambulance callouts (n = 18, 12.3%) or hospital admissions (n = 13, 9%). This is the first observational study describing the use and effectiveness of OMM in adults in community settings. Minimal hospital admissions were reported in this cohort and the treatment was effective in ending seizures in adults in community settings.
    • Incidence, severity and perceived susceptibility of COVID-19 in the UK CrossFit population

      Redwood-Mills, Athalie; Ralston, Grant; Wilson, Jennifer; Nottingham Trent; FiiT for Life Education Ltd, Derby; University of Derby (BioMed Central, 2021-09-06)
      Contemporary literature indicates that a higher body mass index (BMI) serves as a risk factor for metabolic disease and is also correlated with greater disease severity. Subsequently, it has been linked to increased COVID-19 severity. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether regular CrossFit™ participation was associated with lower BMI, decreased COVID-19 severity and susceptibility. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1806 CrossFit™ (CF) participants. Participants were asked about their age (yrs), sex (male vs. female), ethnic group, body height (cm) and weight (kg). Body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) was computed and consistent with WHO (2018) criteria. Participants self-reported their training history, health and lifestyle history, nutritional customs, present training status and suspected levels of exposure to COVID-19. Once submitted the collected data were coded, cleaned and analysed. The final model comprised of 1806 CF individuals from an online survey response rate of 2086. The participants age ranged from 18 to 65+ yrs. Self-reported mean body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) reported that < 1% were underweight, 41% were healthy, 46% overweight, 10% class I obese, 2% class II obese, and < 1% class III obese. A Kruskal–Wallis H test compared gender and self-reported probability of being infected with COVID-19 with significant differences between subgroups (x2 (4, N = 1739) = 10.86, p = 0.03). Analysis of BMI and perceived severity of COVID-19 revealed a difference however not, significant (x2 (4, N = 1739) = 9.46, p = 0.051). Results on BMI and perceived probability of COVID-19 infection revealed no significant difference (x2 (4, N = 1739) = 2.68, p = 0.61). A separate analysis on BMI and perceived COVID-19 susceptibility revealed no significant difference (x2 (4, N = 1740) = 6.02, p = 0.20). The purpose of the study was to establish whether habitual CrossFit™ participation is associated with reduced BMI, and to further investigate whether habitual participation impacted perceptions of disease. Results of the study indicate that self-reported CrossFit™ participation during the first UK lockdown, measured in minutes of exercise was indicative of a lower BMI. This has been associated with greater host immunity to disease. A history of CrossFit™ participation was not shown to impact perceptions of disease. However, our sample population reported few changes to habitual exercise during lockdown which may be due to the ‘community’ and increased adherence associated with CrossFit™.
    • Criminal networks analysis in missing data scenarios through graph distances

      Ficara, Annamaria; Cavallaro, Lucia; Curreri, Francesco; Fiumara, Giacomo; De Meo, Pasquale; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; Song, Wei; Liotta, Antonio; University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; University of Messina, Messina, Italy (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2021-08-11)
      Data collected in criminal investigations may suffer from issues like: (i) incompleteness, due to the covert nature of criminal organizations; (ii) incorrectness, caused by either unintentional data collection errors or intentional deception by criminals; (iii) inconsistency, when the same information is collected into law enforcement databases multiple times, or in different formats. In this paper we analyze nine real criminal networks of different nature (i.e., Mafia networks, criminal street gangs and terrorist organizations) in order to quantify the impact of incomplete data, and to determine which network type is most affected by it. The networks are firstly pruned using two specific methods: (i) random edge removal, simulating the scenario in which the Law Enforcement Agencies fail to intercept some calls, or to spot sporadic meetings among suspects; (ii) node removal, modeling the situation in which some suspects cannot be intercepted or investigated. Finally we compute spectral distances (i.e., Adjacency, Laplacian and normalized Laplacian Spectral Distances) and matrix distances (i.e., Root Euclidean Distance) between the complete and pruned networks, which we compare using statistical analysis. Our investigation identifies two main features: first, the overall understanding of the criminal networks remains high even with incomplete data on criminal interactions (i.e., when 10% of edges are removed); second, removing even a small fraction of suspects not investigated (i.e., 2% of nodes are removed) may lead to significant misinterpretation of the overall network.
    • Continuing professional development and journaling

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-09-13)
      This professional development paper looks at CPD and journaling which will help you discover how journaling can support your professional practice, mental health and continuing professional development.
    • Reflections in Anticipation of Loss

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09-08)
      There is a shadow that quietly, but progressively creeps upon us with advancing age, a sense of being unheard and increasingly cloaked with invisibility. Solitude and loneliness, which is so often a consequence for the elderly, has a deteriorating effect on health, which often goes unrepresented, unacknowledged, and not discussed. A domestic companion offers appeasement, and a dog gains significance where there is no other human present. The lightning talk focuses on the reflective and poignant stories of the anticipated loss of a pet dog told by participants in my artistic research project, Dogs and the Elderly. The project, made with participants from the Alzheimer’s Society’s ‘Memory Cafes’ in Nottingham and Lincolnshire, connects with those held in a companionable embrace with dogs. It offers personal and pertinent stories of the significance of end of live interspecies relationships to be told; it provides the opportunity for others to listen and hear those intimacies and understand the positive value such inter-species relationships bring. The conference presentation addresses and discuss the importance of domestic end of life human-dog relationships, and the anticipation and fear of loss to come. A video, containing the words spoken by participants, will play throughout to illustrate their sentiments.
    • A Call to Clarify the Intensity and Classification of Standing Behavior

      Kowalsky, Robert J; Stoner, Lee; Faghy, Mark A; Barone Gibbs, Bethany; Human Science Research Centre (MDPI, 2021-08-10)
      Public health guidelines for physical activity now include recommendations to break up prolonged sitting with light-intensity activities. Concurrently, interventions to increase standing have emerged, especially within the workplace in the form of sit–stand or standing workstations. Moreover, in short-duration studies, breaking up prolonged sitting with standing has been associated improved cardiometabolic outcomes. Publicly available estimates of the intensity of standing range from 1.5 to 2.3 metabolic equivalents (METs), neatly classifying standing as a light-intensity activity (>1.5 to <3.0 METs). Further delineation between ‘active’ and ‘passive’ standing has been proposed, with corresponding METs of >2.0 METs and ≤2.0 METs, respectively. However, this study reviews data suggesting that some standing (e.g., while performing deskwork) is substantially below the minimum light intensity activity threshold of 1.5 METs. These data bring into question whether standing should be universally classified as a light-intensity behavior. The objectives of this study are to (i) highlight discrepancies in classifying standing behavior in the human movement spectrum continuum, and (ii) to propose a realignment of the ‘active’ vs. ‘passive’ standing threshold to match the light intensity threshold to help provide a clearer research framework and subsequent public health messaging for the expected health benefits from standing.
    • Associations of Sedentary Time with Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

      Alansare, Abdullah Bandar; Bates, Lauren C; Stoner, Lee; Kline, Christopher E; Nagle, Elizabeth; Jennings, J Richard; Hanson, Erik D; Faghy, Mark A; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; King Saud University, Saudi Arabia; et al. (MDPI, 2021-08-12)
      To evaluate if sedentary time (ST) is associated with heart rate (HR) and variability (HRV) in adults we systematically searched PubMed and Google Scholar through June 2020. Inclusion criteria were observational design, humans, adults, English language, ST as the exposure, resting HR/HRV as the outcome, and (meta-analysis only) availability of the quantitative association with variability. After qualitative synthesis, meta-analysis used inverse variance heterogeneity models to estimate pooled associations. Thirteen and eight articles met the criteria for the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. All studies were cross-sectional and few used gold standard ST or HRV assessment methodology. The qualitative synthesis suggested no associations between ST and HR/HRV. The meta-analysis found a significant association between ST and HR (β = 0.24 bpm per hour ST; CI: 0.10, 0.37) that was stronger in males (β = 0.36 bpm per hour ST; CI: 0.19, 0.53). Pooled associations between ST and HRV indices were non-significant (p > 0.05). Substantial heterogeneity was detected. The limited available evidence suggests an unfavorable but not clinically meaningful association between ST and HR, but no association with HRV. Future longitudinal studies assessing ST with thigh-based monitoring and HRV with electrocardiogram are needed
    • Current and Future Implications of COVID-19 among Youth Wheelchair Users: 24-Hour Activity Behavior.

      Conners, Ryan T; Bates, Lauren C; Lassalle, Patricia Pagan; Zieff, Gabriel; Whitehead, Paul N; Stevens, Sandra; Killen, Lauren; Cochrum, Robert; Rodebaugh, Kathryn L; Stoner, Lee; et al. (MDPI, 2021-08-11)
      Preventative measures taken worldwide to decrease the transmission of COVID-19 have had a tremendous impact on youth. Following social restrictions, youth with and without physical disabilities are engaging in less physical activity, more increased sedentary behavior, and poor sleep habits. Specifically, youth wheelchair users (YWU) are likely disproportionately affected by COVID- 19 and have a higher risk of contraction due to underlying comorbidities. While we cannot control all of the negative long-term implications of COVID-19 for YWU, participation in positive 24-h activity behaviors can decrease chronic disease risk and the likelihood of long-term complications resulting from infection. This commentary is to extend the discourse on the importance of 24-h activity behaviors by focusing on YWU. Specifically, we discuss the importance of chronic disease prevention, provide a brief overview of 24-h activity behaviors, and outline some of the lessons that can be learned from the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • The Effects of a Nutrition Education Intervention on Sports Nutrition Knowledge during a Competitive Season in Highly Trained Adolescent Swimmers.

      Foo, Wee Lun; Faghy, Mark A; Sparks, Andy; Newbury, Josh W; Gough, Lewis A; Birmingham City University; University of Derby; University of Illinois at Chicago; Edge Hill University (MDPI, 2021-08-06)
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a seven-week nutrition education intervention on the sports nutrition knowledge (SNK) of highly trained UK adolescent swimmers. Fifteen national and international adolescent swimmers (males = 5; females = 10, 15.5 ± 1.1 years, 170.2 ± 7.5 cm, 60.3 ± 5.7 kg) participated in the study during seven consecutive weeks of the competitive swimming season. The participants received 30 min of nutrition education once per week in a classroom-based setting after they had completed their regular swim training. An undergraduate sports nutrition student delivered all nutrition education sessions and SNK questionnaires were administered to the participants pre- and post-intervention. The mean total SNK score improved by 8.3% (SD = 8.4%, 95% CI = 4.1-12.6; p = 0.006; ES = 1.0) following the nutrition education sessions. On an individual basis, ten swimmers significantly improved their total SNK score, whereas four swimmers did not improve, and one swimmer performed significantly worse after the intervention. Moreover, the swimmers' knowledge of hydration improved by 22.2% (SD = 20.6%, 95% CI = 11.8-32.6, p = 0.004, ES = 1.1) over the seven-week timeframe, which was the only nutrition topic to have a significantly increased knowledge score. The current study therefore suggests that a nutrition education intervention can positively influence the SNK of highly trained adolescent swimmers.
    • Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people and explorations of creative ageing

      Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-08-04)
      The aim of this article was to report findings from a qualitative focus group study conducted to understand the subjective experiences of community-dwelling healthy older people engaging in a range of participatory arts activities. The article also uses the participants' voices to consider nuances and interconnections of themes to unpack the complexities of ‘participatory arts’ engagement and support a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’. This study involved qualitative focus group interviews. Focus group interviews were conducted with five groups of healthy older people (aged ≥50 years) living in the community (i.e. not in residential care settings). Participants were recruited through self-selected sampling, and on the basis of self-reporting, no diagnosis of ill-health. Focus group interviews were digitally recorded and analysed using thematic analysis. Themes developed from a systematic review of participatory arts for promoting well-being in later life conducted previously by the author were used as the stimulus for conversation in the focus groups. Interviews were not transcribed, rather pseudonymised quotations are used to support the themes. The study also explored barriers to participation, although these findings are not reported here. Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people focused on everyday creativity and reflections on the term ‘participation’, which challenge the traditional focus of arts and health research on the effects of active engagement. Healthy older people experienced a sense of achievement and ‘flow’ through creative engagement, which led to opportunities for social interaction and developing a sense of purpose. Through transitions of ageing, older people found creative ways of rediscovering their identity in later life, which supported resilience and highlighted a connection between body, mind and soul. Findings suggest that participation in everyday creative experiences can lead to a sense of achievement and purpose, which provides support and structure in the construction of changing identity in later life. Participatory arts engagement is particularly instrumental during transitions of ageing. This study provides a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’ which challenges traditional ideas of ‘participatory arts’ and audience engagement by focusing on subjectivities of the participant voice. The framework moves debate beyond a focus on the efficacy of arts engagement to consider the relevance of subjective experiences of everyday creativity in later life.
    • 'Mixed white and Black Caribbean' millennials in Britain: An exploration of identity

      Clarke, Yasmine; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-07-26)
      This study presents a qualitative exploration of individuals identifying as ‘mixed white and Black Caribbean’ (MWBC) in Britain. The focus of this research aimed to answer the question, 'how do mixed white and Black Caribbean millennials in Britain experience their identity?' Six participants, aged 22–31 years, were interviewed about their family, relationships and personal values. The results were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis and highlighted three main themes: ‘Public Perception’, ‘Caribbean Heritage’ and ‘Conversations’. Each theme was analysed from an integrative psychotherapeutic viewpoint, before concluding with suggestions for counsellors and psychotherapists working with this client group in clinical practice.
    • Predictors of poor 6-week outcome in a cohort of major depressive disorder patients treated with antidepressant medication: the role of entrapment

      Carvalho, Serafim; Caetano, Filipa; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Mota-Pereira, Jorge; Maia, Dulce; Pimentel, Paulo; Priscila, Cátia; Gilbert, Paul; Hospital de Magalhães Lemos, Porto, Portugal; Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2020-07-10)
      Only a small number of consistent processes predict which depressed patients will achieve remission with antidepressant medication. One set of processes is that of social ranking strategies/variables that are related to life events and severe difficulties. Particularly, defeat and entrapment predict poorer response to antidepressants. However, results are inconsistent. The current study aimed to evaluate evolutionary strategies, childhood maltreatment, neglect and life events and difficulties (LEDs) as predictors of remission in depressed patients undergoing pharmacological treatment in a psychiatric outpatient sample. A cohort of 139 depressed outpatients undergoing pharmacological treatment was followed prospectively in a naturalistic study for 6 weeks. Two major evaluations were considered at baseline and 6 weeks. We allocated patients to a pharmacological treatment algorithm for depression – the Texas Medication Algorithm Project. Variables evaluated at baseline and tested as predictors of remission included demographic and clinical data, severity of depression, social ranking, evolution informed variables, LEDs and childhood maltreatment. Of the 139 patients, only 24.5% were remitted at week 6. In univariate analyses, non-remitted patients scored significantly higher in all psychopathology and vulnerability scales except for submissive behaviour and internal entrapment. For the logistic regression, a higher load of LEDs of the entrapment and humiliation dimension in the year before the index episode (OR = 6.62), and higher levels external entrapment in the Entrapment Scale (OR = 1.10) predicted non-remission. These variables accounted for 28.7% of the variance. Multivariate analysis revealed that external entrapment was the only predictor of non-remission.
    • The flows of compassion in adolescents as measured by the compassionate engagement and action scales

      Cunha, Marina; Galhardo, Ana; Gilbert, Paul; Rodrigues, Cátia; Matos, Marcela; University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-07-23)
      The development of self-report instruments assessing the different facets of compassion adapted for different age groups is crucial for research and clinical practice. This study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the adaptation to adolescents of the Compassionate Engagement and Action Scales (CEAS-A) in a sample of 674 Portuguese adolescents. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the factor structure of the CEAS-A was similar to the one found in the adults’ version, with higher-order factor models encompassing two first/s-order factors in each scale (Engagement and Actions). The CEAS-A revealed good construct validity, reliability, and temporal stability. Gender differences were found in Self-compassion and Compassion for Other scales. Path analysis results indicated that self-criticism had a direct negative impact on adolescents’ life satisfaction, whereas the impact of self-reassurance on life satisfaction was partially mediated by self-compassion and compassion from others. The CEAS-A is the first self-report instrument that allows for the assessment of the three different flows of compassion in adolescents and may be an important and useful tool for research and clinical practice.
    • Policing in a pandemic: a commentary on officer well-being during COVID-19

      Edwards, Ann-Marie; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-07-24)
      The role of police officers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is challenging, faced with the difficult task of keeping communities safe and preventing the spread of COVID-19 while putting their physical and mental health at risk. Emerging evidence points to the stress experiences of officers during the COVID-19 pandemic. With cases now surpassing 174 million and close to four million deaths worldwide, as well as stringent lockdown measures, police officers are faced with unprecedented challenges resulting from the pandemic. This commentary suggests police departments strengthen resources by putting in place appropriate emergency planning for future public health incidents, in addition to preparing for temporary or permanent loss of human resources. It is important to implement robust training plans post-pandemic to allow officers to offer better care for communities when faced with future public health emergencies. Finally, police officers should be provided with the resources and support to cope with the stresses associated with COVID-19.
    • Self-compassion in Irish social work students: Relationships between resilience, engagement and motivation

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Tsuda-McCaie, Freya; Edwards, Ann-Marie; Bhandari, Divya; Maughan, Geraldine; University of Derby; Medical Governance Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan; Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Ireland (MDPI AG, 2021-08-02)
      Self-compassion recognises a meaning of life's suffering, aligning with existential positive psy-chology. Although this construct is known to protect our mental health, how to augment self-compassion remains to be evaluated. Social work students suffer from high rates of mental health problems, however research into self-compassion in this population remains to be devel-oped. This study aimed to evaluate i) relationships between self-compassion and more tradition-al positive constructs—resilience, engagement and motivation, and ii) differences of these con-structs between the levels of studies, to inform how self-compassion can be enhanced in social work students. One hundred twenty-nine Irish social work students completed self-report scales regarding self-compassion, resilience, engagement and motivation. Correlation, regression, and one-way MANOVA were conducted. Self-compassion was associated with gender, age, resili-ence, engagement and intrinsic motivation. Resilience and intrinsic motivation were significant predictors of self-compassion. There was no significant difference in the levels of these constructs between the levels of studies. Findings suggest that social work educators across different levels can strengthen students’ resilience and intrinsic motivation to cultivate the students' self-compassion. Moreover, the close relationships between self-compassion, resilience and in-trinsic motivation indicate that orienting students to a meaning of the studies helps their mental health.
    • Student perspectives on improving mental health support services at university

      Priestley, Michael; Broglia, Emma; Hughes, Gareth; Spanner, Leigh; Durham University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby; Student Minds, Leeds (Wiley, 2021-02-08)
      Drawing on thematic analysis of six student co-creation panels, conducted during the Student Minds University Mental Health Charter consultations, this paper elucidates students’ perspectives and proposals regarding the current issues and challenges around university student mental health and well-being support services. In particular, panels identified existing challenges and opportunities to improve support service access, strategy, and delivery. The panels generated a series of recommendations aimed to establish a clear, coordinated, and strategic approach to delivering accessible and inclusive student mental health support services that are responsive to the diverse needs of the whole student population. Significantly, the student panels situated service reforms within a ‘whole university approach’ entailing holistic structural and cultural change to the university environment, in order to enrich student mental health and well-being and reduce demand on services. The findings of this paper can both reaffirm and specify the principles of good practice propounded by the University Mental Health Charter from a student perspective.
    • A systematic literature review of machine learning applications for community-acquired pneumonia

      Lozano-Rojas, Daniel; Free, Robert C.; McEwan, Alistair A.; Woltmann, Gerrit; University of Leicester; University of Derby; University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (Springer, 2021-08-15)
      Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory disease with a high mortality rate. CAP management follows clinical and radiological diagnosis, severity evaluation and standardised treatment protocols. Although established in practice, protocols are labour intensive, time-critical and can be error prone, as their effectiveness depends on clinical expertise. Thus, an approach for capturing clinical expertise in a more analytical way is desirable both in terms of cost, expediency, and patient outcome. This paper presents a systematic literature review of Machine Learning (ML) applied to CAP. A search of three scholarly international databases revealed 23 relevant peer reviewed studies, that were categorised and evaluated relative to clinical output. Results show interest in the application of ML to CAP, particularly in image processing for diagnosis, and an opportunity for further investigation in the application of ML; both for patient outcome prediction and treatment allocation. We conclude our review by identifying potential areas for future research in applying ML to improve CAP management. This research was co-funded by the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre and the University of Leicester.
    • Food for thought – empowering consumers: a critique of EU food labelling law

      Meiselles, Michala; University of Derby (Irish Society of European Law, 2021)
      Intended to support a sensible and independent decision-making process by consumers whilst preventing the spread of misinformation, food information is an essential means of communication with consumers. This paper asks how the effectiveness of the current system of food information in the European Union (EU) can be improved from the point of view of the consumer? To answer this question, the author looks at the deficiencies of the existing regulatory framework to show that whilst the current structure provides consumers with comprehensive and reliable information, the mechanics of the system are inadequate. In light of these gaps, the paper advocates the position that the EU should consider introducing a mandatory FOPNL (front-of-package nutrition label) supported by an information campaign, aimed at enhancing the ability of consumers to use food information to make rational and healthy food choices. To this end, this paper looks at the existing regulatory framework (part 1) before exploring the literature on mandatory disclosure regulation and highlighting the problems associated with food information from the consumer’s perspective (part 2). In the final segment, this paper looks at FOPNLs and the way in which the latter can be combined with an information campaign to enhance consumer food labelling literacy.