For the most recent Open Access research publications on Covid-19, please follow this link to DOAJ (the Directory of Open Access Journals) where you will be redirected to a number of free to access literature.

 

Access to Taylor and Francis microsite for free Covid-19 literature is available here. 

 

Welcome to UDORA, the University of Derby Online Research Archive.

UDORA is the institutional repository of research produced by staff at the University of Derby, and an archive of our completed doctoral theses.

If you are a member of staff ready to submit your research, please see our Quick Guide to Getting Started.

We welcome any feedback. Please contact UDORA@derby.ac.uk

 

Select a community to browse its collections.

  • A Systematic Review Approach Using the Behaviour Change Wheel, COM-B Behaviour Model and Theoretical Domains Framework to Evaluate Physical Activity Engagement in a University Setting

    Bussell, Chris; Faghy, Mark; Staples, Vicki; Lipka, Sigrid; Ndupu, Lawrence (University of DerbyEngineering and Technology, University of Derby, 2021-09-09)
    Introduction: Physical activity has been recognised to offer health benefits and reduce the risks of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, cancer, depression, and atherosclerosis. However, even with the known health benefits of physical activity, over a quarter of adults globally are physically inactive, which is a serious public health concern and thus calls for concerted efforts to increase physical activity levels in diverse settings. A university is a unique setting in which to promote health enhancing behaviours, such as physical activity, because it offers opportunity to be active (e.g., in-built sports facilities), provides flexible working conditions to enable staff and students a reasonable level of autonomy in managing their individual time and endowed with highly educated and well-informed staff base, which has been previously shown to influence individuals’ engagement in physical activity. Therefore, the overall aim of the PhD research project was to understand the barriers and enablers to physical activity among university staff and students, design an intervention informed by this understanding and implement intervention to address these barriers, in order to create behaviours that lead to better engagement in physical activity. Methods: A mixed-methods experimental design was utilised throughout the research, incorporating both qualitative (group interviews) and quantitative (surveys) data collection. The four experimental studies that make up this programme of work were designed using established behaviour change models, i.e., the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW), the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour (COM-B) model and/or the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). The qualitative data were analysed in Nvivo12 using deductive content analysis, while the qualitative data were analysed using SPSS Statistical software 26.0, with significance level set at 0.05. Results: Six prominent domains were identified as enablers and barriers to physical activity among university staff and students, i.e., knowledge; social influences; social/professional role and identity; environmental context and resources; beliefs about capabilities; and intentions (study 1). About 78.0% of the administrative staff and 67.0% of the PhD students were physically inactive, i.e., achieving less than 600 MET-minutes/week of moderate intensity physical activity. A multiple regression analysis showed that of the 14 domains of the TDF, the ‘physical skills’ domain (t 106 = 2.198, p=0.030) was the only significant predictor of physical inactivity among the administrative staff, while the ‘knowledge’ (t 99 = 2.018, p= 0.046) and ‘intentions’ (t 99 = 4.240, p=0.001) were the only predictors of physical inactivity amongst the PhD students (study 2). The administrative staff that were assigned to engage in supervised exercise sessions (experimental group) reported higher physical skills scores and overall physical activity levels compared to the control (study 3). The PhD students that were allocated to the education and intentions group, who received educational materials and asked to form implementation intentions of times, days and places they intend to carry out physical activity, reported higher overall physical activity levels compared to other treatment groups, i.e., intentions only, education only and control groups (study 4). Conclusion: This thesis contributes to the knowledge on adult’s physical activity by detailing the development, implementation, and assessment of a bespoke brief 4-week behaviour change intervention that effectively increased university administrative staff and PhD students’ total physical activity levels, as well as time spent in physical activity weekly. The university was established as a unique setting to promote health-enhancing behaviour such as promotion of physical activity. Therefore, theory-based interventions underpinned by the BCW, COM-B model and TDF may provide an effective strategy to improve university staff and students’ engagement in physical activity, as well as their overall wellbeing.
  • (Mis)Use of Personal Technology by Employees in Financial Services Organisations

    Hicks, David; Henry, Phil; Hodgson, Philip; Collis, Raichel (University of DerbyBusiness, Law and Social Sciences, 2021-09-01)
    This work presents a single methodology design across three different groups to chart the challenges and potential of digital investigation and to offer an original contribution to researchers seeking purposive samples specific to topical research questions. Open-source online intelligence theorised from an attacker's perspective is underpinned by a novel cyber-orientated framework of routine activity theory (RAT) (Cohen and Felson, 1979) to highlight digital footprint as a vector for targeted social engineering. Seventy-six (N=76) demographically diverse financial services employees from occupations throughout the sector provide empirical data via a mixed methods online survey. Cyber-specific RAT evaluates the ‘average user’ (with no specialist training) as a potential contributor to human assisted cybercrime threatening corporate networks through use of personal technologies and internet-based activities. Robust discussion debates routine digital activity using smartphones, tablets, and consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices as an unmitigated factor for workplace risk. Personal internet use, devices accessing corporate networks, self-promotion on social media, physical and virtual IoT, executive personnel practicing ‘unsafe’ behaviours and assumed device security as licence for unrestricted online activity are key findings of this study which offers original contributions to critical assessment of insider threat. Despite employee (mis)use of personal technology as a potential vector financial organisations are seemingly unprepared for small-scale and dynamic risk. Results recommend bespoke training at all levels to associate personal use and online behaviour with known cyber risks and capacity for loss or harm. Cyber-RAT as a framework to identify suitable targets and potential for guardianship will contribute value added and assist in a more holistic response to cybercrime where the human element complements technological solutions as a positive enhancement to enterprise security.
  • All the Small Things exhibition

    Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09-10)
    All the Small Things is an exhibition of artworks, designs, films and music at Artcore's Derby City Centre gallery. The exhibition presents the exciting and diverse work produced by staff in the School of Arts at the University of Derby, and includes artefacts, videos, painting, drawing and photography, amongst others. The exhibition covers the range of disciplines represented and taught within the University's School of Arts portfolio - fine art, photography, design, film, media, performing arts, and therapeutic arts. The rules: objects and wall-based works should be no bigger than 6 inches x 6 inches x 6 inches; films no longer than 5 minutes duration. Curated by Angela Bartram.
  • Transition distress: a psychological process

    Hughes, Gareth; University of Derby (BACP, 2016-09-01)
    It will come as no surprise to anybody working within higher education, that many students find the transition into university emotionally and psychologically difficult. We clearly understand that students going through transition can experience psychological distress, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, a reduction in self-esteem and isolation.1–5 Many students describe a loss of feelings of control, and doubts about whether or not to stay at their new university. This is particularly concerning for universities, as research has identified that successful transition is a key element in determining retention and future student success.6–10 While most of us probably recognise all of this, there is often less understanding about why some students find transition so difficult, and more importantly, what we can do about it. In the last few years, I and my colleagues in Student Wellbeing at the University of Derby have been researching student transition in order to develop better interventions to support new students. Our research, and the research of many others in the field, suggests that we may need to rethink some of the ways in which we approach transition, if we want to provide our students with the most effective support. In this article, I briefly describe some of our work so far (some of which has been published and presented elsewhere), and propose a new model of transition. I do this with one important caveat. As George Box said: ‘All models are wrong, but some models are useful.’11 I don’t pretend that this model encapsulates every single student’s experience but I hope it may provide a useful way of thinking about what our students may be experiencing, how we can target our support and how this learning can be used to good effect in the therapy room.
  • Perineal Trauma & Suturing

    Chapman, Vicky; Independent Researcher (Wiley Blackwell, 2018-01-18)

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