For the most recent Open Access research publications on Covid-19, please follow this link to DOAJ (the Directory of Open Access Journals) where you will be redirected to a number of free to access literature.

 

Access to Taylor and Francis microsite for free Covid-19 literature is available here. 

 

Welcome to UDORA, the University of Derby Online Research Archive.

UDORA is the institutional repository of research produced by staff at the University of Derby, and an archive of our completed doctoral theses.

If you are a member of staff ready to submit your research, please see our Quick Guide to Getting Started.

We welcome any feedback. Please contact UDORA@derby.ac.uk

 

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  • Exploration and Prioritization of Just in Time Enablers for Sustainable Healthcare: An Integrated GRA-Fuzzy TOPSIS Application

    Singh Kaswan, Mahender; Rathi, Rajeev; Singh, Mahipal; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Antony, Jiju; Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India; University of Derby; Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (Emerald, 2021-06-21)
    The increased healthcare costs, improved service quality, and sustainability-oriented customer demand have forced the healthcare sector to relook their current process. The present work deals with the identification, analysis, and prioritization of Just in Time (JIT) enablers in the healthcare sector. JIT leads to waste reduction, improves productivity, and provides high quality patient care. The practical implementation of JIT depends on vital factors known as enablers. The enablers have been found through the comprehensive literature review and prioritized using responses from different healthcare facilities of national capital region of India. Grey Relational Analysis (GRA) has been used in the present study to rank enablers and ranks were further validated using fuzzy TOPSIS and sensitivity analysis. It has been found that top management support, teamwork, and real-time information sharing are the most significant enablers of JIT in healthcare with grey relational grades 0.956, 0.832, and 0.718, respectively. The corresponding closeness coefficients of the fuzzy TOPSIS for the enablers were found as 0.875, 0.802, and 0.688, respectively. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to implement a comprehensive JIT approach that further leads to improved patient care at low cost. The present study is unique in terms of the exploration of the readiness measures or enablers of JIT using GRA and fuzzy TOPSIS. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to optimize their resources for better patient care.
  • Definitions of biodiversity from urban gardeners

    Norton, Briony, A.; Shang, Bowen; Sheffield, David; Ramsey, Andrew; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-06-14)
    Living in urban environments can leave people disconnected from nature and less likely to engage with biodiversity conservation. Within urban areas, residential gardens can occupy large proportions of greenspace and provide important habitat for biodiversity. Understanding the views and knowledge of garden owners who have collective responsibility for managing these areas is therefore important. We aimed to understand how urban garden owners understand biodiversity. We surveyed garden owners in Derby, UK, across 20 areas spanning a socioeconomic spectrum. Residents were asked to explain their understanding of ‘biodiversity’ in a short definition format. Responses were classified using thematic and word frequency analyses. Of 255 respondents, approximately one third were unable to provide a definition. From the definitions provided, themes that emerged in frequency order were: variety of species or environments; coexistence of organisms; conservation of nature; a synonym for habitat; and uncommon answers not clearly related to biodiversity. Members of wildlife or gardening charities were more likely than non-members to say they could define biodiversity and to use specific taxonomic terms. We detected no difference between keen and less keen gardeners. These short-form responses captured many themes longer and/or qualitative assessments have identified about people’s understanding of biodiversity and illustrate a diversity and, in some cases, a depth of understanding of the concepts of biodiversity, without necessarily adhering to the formal definition. Given the variety of understanding, at this critical period, technical terms, even common ones, should be used with caution and with an open mind about how people interpret them.
  • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

    Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
    Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
  • Crisis Management and Recovery for Events: Impacts and Strategies

    Ziakas, Vassilios; Antchak, Vladimir; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; University of Queensland (Goodfellow Publishers, 2021-04-01)
    Reveals how to effectively manage events in times of crisis, and leveraging events for post-disaster recovery. The volume brings together theoretical and practical insights in order to set up a robust ground for effective crisis management and recovery strategies of events.
  • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

    Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
    To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.

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